Michael Kearley, DVM

Michael Kearley, DVM

Veterinarian

Educations & Trainings

  • DVM degree May 2013
  • BS degree May 2009
  • AA degree May 2006

Activity & Honors

Shelter Medicine Certificate

Professional Memberships

AVMA

Dr. Michael Kearley

Dr. Michael Kearley graduated from the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine in 2013. He graduated with a certificate in shelter medicine as he has a fondness for unwanted and neglected pets, and strives to give a voice to the voiceless as he advocates for support of local shelters and humane organizations. He is originally from Temple Terrace where he attended Florida College and later transferred to the University of Florida for his undergraduate studies. Prior to veterinary school, he worked in animal hospitals as a veterinary technician and later as a surgical technician. His veterinary interests include preventive care with an emphasis on client education, clinical pathology, and anesthesia, and he is Fear Free Certified. He now resides in Land O Lakes with his wife, Irene. They are joined by three sons and three fish. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time outdoors, baking, and visiting theme parks with his family and friends.

Recent Articles

Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs
Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs
What Is Elbow Dysplasia in Dogs?The canine elbow is a complex articulating joint made up of three bones: the humerus, the radius, and the ulna. These bones work together to allow a dog to bend, run, and play. Elbow dysplasia is a condition related to abnormal bone growth and/or development that alters the function of this joint, leading to abnormal weight distribution, pain, and arthritis—which...
Osteosarcoma In Cats
Osteosarcoma In Cats
What Is Osteosarcoma in Cats?Osteosarcoma (OSA) is an aggressive or malignant bone cancer that affects any part of the skeleton. In cats, appendicular OSA may affect the limbs, pelvis, shoulders, or paws. It is much more common than axial OSA, which may target the head, neck, or spine. Appendicular OSA affects the pelvis more often than the forelimbs, and the jaw is the most common bone affected...
Chronic Vomiting in Cats
Chronic Vomiting in Cats
What Is Chronic Vomiting in Cats?As a cat parent, it doesn’t take long to realize that cleaning up vomit is a common occurrence.  Occasional vomiting is normal in cats, but if it happens regularly, then it often has an underlying cause and should be investigated.  Vomiting in cats usually follows drooling, excessive swallowing, retching, nausea, and a lack of appetite. Occasional vomiting or...
What to Know: Adopting a FeLV+ Cat
The following may contain Chewy links. PetMD is operated by Chewy. What Does It Mean if a Cat Is FeLV+?Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is an infectious disease commonly found in cats. Fortunately, with the commercial development of a vaccine, it has become less common over the past few decades. However, despite being preventable, it is still diagnosed fairly often and poses significant...
What to Know: Adopting a Tripod Dog
The following may contain Chewy links. PetMD is operated by Chewy. Even though a dog may be missing a leg, they can live a long and healthy life without it. Understanding the needs of your three-legged pet and how to make their life easier is the first step in helping them live a full life. Dogs with three legs can certainly adapt to their situation and make for playful, loving, and lifelong...
IBD in Dogs
IBD in Dogs
What Is IBD in Dogs?Despite its name, inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD, is not a disease but a syndrome that is caused by chronic irritation of the intestinal tract. It stems from multiple factors, which are usually a group of symptoms that occur because of a single disease or combination of diseases. Whatever the cause, the result is inflammation within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Often...