Kasey Stopp, DVM, CVA

Kasey Stopp, DVM, CVA

VETERINARIAN (INTEGRATIVE MEDICINE)
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Educations & Trainings

DVM, University of Georgia, 2013

BA Communications, University of Cincinnati, 2002

Activity & Honors

Teaches a Vet Science class weekly at local STEM school

Certificate of Merit for Proficiency in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery

Edward E. Hood Foundation Companion Animal Scholarship

Dr. Jesse C. Hardy Scholarship

Student Ambassador for the College of Veterinary Medicine

Professional Memberships

AVMA

GVMA

WATCVM

Dr. Kasey Stopp

Dr. Kasey Stopp was born in rural Illinois but spent most of her life in Cincinnati, Ohio. She attended the University of Cincinnati where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Communications and went on to manage the consumer affairs divisions of several Fortune 500 companies. But her childhood dream of being a veterinarian never died. Because of this, she consistently worked part-time for animal hospitals while continuing her career in business. After a job change relocated her family, she returned to classes and, after completing veterinary prerequisites, was accepted to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Stopp has a special interest in integrative medicine and has attended hundreds of hours of specialized training in order to offer those modalities to her patients. After extensive written and practical testing, she was certified in animal chiropractic by the International Veterinary Chiropractic Association in August of 2013. Following six months of study and practice with the Chi Institute, she successfully completed testing to become a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist in June of 2015. Outside of vet med, Dr. Stopp enjoys hiking, traveling, scuba diving, reading, and spending time with her husband, son, three dogs, and one cat.

Recent Articles

Kidney Cancer in Dogs
Kidney Cancer in Dogs
What is Kidney Cancer in Dogs?Dogs have two kidneys located just above the bladder, near the spine and midway down the back. Similar to humans, dogs rely on these bean-shaped organs to help control blood pressure, filter waste from the blood, maintain the balance of nutrients in the blood, and increase production of red blood cells.   The kidneys and their surrounding tissues can develop...
12 Dog Tongue Facts
12 Dog Tongue Facts
Whether it’s getting every last morsel of food from their bowl, panting after a game of fetch, or showering you with affection, a dog’s tongue plays an important role in how they interact with their environment. Here are some interesting facts that you probably don’t know about dog tongues. Dogs pant to cool down instead of sweating.Dogs don’t sweat in the same way as humans. They only...
Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma in Dogs
What Is Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma in Dogs? Dogs have four pairs of salivary glands located within the jaw or neck region. These glands create saliva that is excreted into your dog’s mouth. Similar to other types of glands, cancer can form in the salivary glands. The most common type of salivary gland cancer in dogs is adenocarcinoma. This is an aggressive and malignant type of cancer that...
Stomatitis in Cats
Stomatitis in Cats
What Is Stomatitis in Cats?Stomatitis in cats is a complex, painful, and frustrating disease that causes severe inflammation of the entire mouth, including the gingiva (gum tissue around the teeth) and mucous membranes. Feline stomatitis [often called feline chronic gingivo-stomatitis (FCGS) by veterinary dentists] affects up to 10% of cats. Symptoms of Stomatitis in CatsThe first symptom of...
Why Do Dogs Lick You?
Why Do Dogs Lick You?
You may love your dog, but not all of us like “kisses” from our furry canine friends. Most pet parents believe their dogs lick them to show affection, but why do dogs really lick us? Does it mean something different if your dog licks your face, hands, ears, or feet? Why Do Dogs Lick People?Licking is a natural instinct in dogs. Studies have shown that licking releases endorphins in a dog’s...
Why Do Dogs Lick The Air?
Why Do Dogs Lick The Air?
Has your dog ever stopped in the middle of a walk to point their nose to the sky and lick the air? Do they ever lick at the air briefly after eating a meal or enjoying a treat? Or maybe you hit the perfect itchy spot on your pup, and they licked at the air while you scratched it. This may seem confusing or unusual or even funny to us, but licking the air can help dogs communicate a variety of...