Non-inflammatory Myopathy of Endocrine Origin in Cats

Alex German
   |   
Feb 24, 2010
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This form of non-inflammatory myopathy is a type of muscle disease caused by endocrine maladies such as hypo- and hyperthyroidism. However, non-inflammatory myopathy of endocrine origin has also been associated with corticosteroid use.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of muscle bulk
  • Stiffness
  • Cramps
  • Regurgitation
  • Difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Hoarseness (dysphonia)

 

Causes

 

Ultimately, this type of non-inflammatory myopathy is due to an endocrine disorder -- such as hyperadrenocorticism, hypothyroidism, or hyperthyroidism -- but may be immune-mediated or neoplastic in nature.

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to the veterinarian. He or she will then conduct a complete physical examination as well as a biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and complete blood count (CBC) to determine the type of endocrine disorder. Your veterinarian will also conduct thyroid and adrenal gland functions tests to confirm the diagnosis.

 

X-rays are conducted to evaluate pharyngeal and esophageal functions -- especially in patients with regurgitation and dysphagia -- while muscle samples are sent to veterinary pathologist for further evaluation.

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