Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

Pet Family

PetMD Seal

Anemia Due to Chronic Kidney Disease in Dogs

 

Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone, produced in the kidneys, that controls the production of red blood cells. For development and maturation of red blood cells to take place, bone marrow requires an adequate supply of erythropoietin, so in cases of chronic kidney disease (CKD), where the kidney is unable to function well enough to produce adequate amounts of EPO, the marrow is likewise unable to produce an adequate supply of red blood cells. Lack of RBC production will inevitably lead to anemia in dogs that are suffering from this condition. Anemia due to CKD is usually seen in middle-aged to older dogs but can also occur in young dogs.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Anemia in this case is principally related to chronic kidney disease. The symptoms are mixed, relating to both the CKD and the anemia. Following are some of the symptoms related to anemia in the presence of CKD:

 

  • Weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Lethargy
  • Depression
  • Weakness
  • Apathy (state of indifference)
  • Cold intolerance
  • Changes in behavior
  • Tachypnea (rapid breathing)
  • Tachycardia (rapid heartbeat)
  • Syncope (fainting)
  • Seizures

 

Causes

 

Following are some of the causes for chronic kidney failure and anemia:

  • Inherited
  • Congenital (pups born with the problem)
  • Acquired form ( in later life)
  • Iron deficiency
  • Infections
  • Cancer
  • Blood loss through the alimentary tract (the entire canal from the mouth to the anus)
  • Diseases that cause disruption of RBCs

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to give a thorough history of your dog's health, including a background history of symptoms. After taking a complete history, your veterinarian will conduct a complete physical examination on your dog. Laboratory tests will include a complete blood profile, a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis. The results of these tests will provide valuable information for the diagnosis of the cause of the kidney failure and the extent of anemia related to it. Your veterinarian will be particularly interested in knowing the level of erythropoietin in the blood. Specific tests may be used to diagnose the underlying cause of the chronic kidney disease and resulting anemia. An examination of the bone marrow examination may be conducted to evaluate the structure and functions of the bone marrow. X-ray and ultrasound imaging will show any abnormal structure of the kidneys that is typical in chronic kidney disease, and ultrasound may reveal smaller than normal or irregular-shaped kidneys, both characteristic of chronic kidney disease.

 

 

 

Related Articles

Anemia (Methemoglobinemia) in Dogs
Under normal conditions, methemoglobin is converted back to hemoglobin, and a balance...
READ MORE
Overproduction of Red Blood Cells in Dogs
Polycythemia is a rather serious blood condition, characterized as an abnormal increase...
READ MORE
Parasitic Blood Infection (Haemobartonellosis...
The mycoplasma is a class of bacterial parasites belonging to the order of Mollicutes....
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search dog Articles

 

Latest In Dog Nutrition

Five Life-Lengthening Health Tips for Your ...
Anyone who has ever had a dog or cat wishes just one thing — that he or she has a...
READ MORE
How Antioxidants Improve Our Pet's Health, ...
The science behind pet nutrition continues to make major advances. One such example...
READ MORE
How Your Overweight Pet Could Benefit from ...
Pet obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Fortunately, there are some things...
READ MORE
Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM