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Doggie Dental Care

Your dog deserves a bright smile and a clean mouth, too. Make "doggie breath" a thing of the past and brush your pup’s teeth regularly.

 

Let’s face it, you don’t want to kiss someone with stinky breath. You like your kisses to be sweet, and from someone who brushes their teeth. The same should go for your beloved canine friend. You want those doggy kisses to be sweet, not a mouthful of bad breath.

 

Unfortunately, dogs lack opposable thumbs and can’t use a toothbrush. You certainly don’t want to hurt any doggy feelings, because dogs are people, too. But never fear. The answer is actually quite simple.

 

Brush your dog’s teeth on a regular basis.

 

This is important because the same oral health issues you deal with, apply to your dog. Regular brushing, you see, helps keep the dog’s teeth and gums in tip-top shape, keeps tartar buildup and cavities under control, and, most importantly, gives your dog sweet, minty fresh breath.

 

So how exactly do you clean your dog's teeth? Because dog’s teeth are spaced more widely than yours, there’s no need for flossing. And you can use either a special toothbrush made for dogs, or a special finger glove brush that allows you to brush with your finger.

 

Also, there’s no need for rinsing and spitting. Since dogs can’t use human toothpaste, there are special types which you can buy that don't require rinsing.

 

Dental hygiene is about good maintenance and health. Check to see if there are any broken teeth or other signs of ill health while you are inspecting your dog's mouth. Dogs are known to damage teeth by experimenting with rocks as food, chewing on hard bones, or by catching Frisbees, sticks and other hard objects. The good news is that by making teeth cleanings a routine, you'll catch any dental problems before they become severe. Early detection is good news for everyone, as it may save your dog's teeth -- it'll probably even save you a large vet bill.

 

Make brushing your dog's teeth a part of the weekly grooming process. Your dog will feel like the center of the universe, and you’ll be able to indulge in doggy kisses without bad dog breath again. It’s a win-win situation.

 

Image: The Giant Vermin / via Flickr

 

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