Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Cavities in Dogs

ADVERTISEMENT

Dental Caries in Dogs

 

Dental caries is a condition in which the dental hard tissues decay as the result of oral bacteria on the tooth surface. While dental caries is not common in the domestic pet, it does occur and should be watched for. A 1988 study, reported in the Journal of Veterinary Dentistry, found that 5.3 percent of dogs one year of age or older had one or more caries lesions, with 52 percent of that group having bilaterally symmetrical lesions. Caries can affect the crown or the roots of the teeth, and is classified as pit-and-fissure caries, smooth-surface caries, or root caries. There is no known breed, age, or gender risk.

 

The condition or disease described in this medical article can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects cats, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

  • Incipient (about to become apparent) smooth-surface caries appears as an area of dull, frosty-white enamel
  • A structural defect on the surface of the crown or root will be apparent, and will show dark, soft, decayed dentin - the layer just under the enamel

 

Causes

 

Caries is caused by bacteria fermenting carbohydrates on the tooth surface. This fermentation leads to the production of acids that demineralize the enamel and dentin. Following demineralization, the organic matrix of the tooth is digested by oral bacteria and/or white blood cells. The health of the teeth is based on the constant exchange of minerals between enamel and oral fluids, so when there is prolonged retention of fermentable carbohydrates and bacterial plaque on the tooth surface, and this condition leads to a net loss of mineral, the tooth will be disposed to the development of caries. Early caries may be reversible through re-mineralization, but once the protein matrix collapses, the lesion is irreversible. Even if only one tooth has become irreversibly damaged, care must be taken to protect the remaining teeth, since dental surfaces in close contact with an established caries are at risk of developing a lesion as well.

 

Some of the inherent risk factors that will encourage the development of caries are when the teeth are very tight together, resulting in smooth-surface caries; and when deep pockets between the teeth and gums allow bacteria to gather. Fermenting carbohydrates will take up residence in these pockets, inflicting damage low on the tooth, closer to the root. But, it is where the top and bottom teeth meet on the maxillary first molar, in the pit of the tooth, that dental caries most commonly develops. Developmental grooves on the crown surface of the tooth, and deep pits where the teeth touch each other, will dispose the tooth to pit-and-fissure caries. Overall health and diet play a role in the development of caries as well. Animals with poorly mineralized enamel, lower salivary pH, diets high in fermentable carbohydrates, and poor oral hygiene are all at risk for developing dental caries.

 

 

Diagnosis

 

There are five primary stages of the pathology:

 

  • Stage 1 : defect involves enamel only
  • Stage 2 : defect extends into dentin; pulp chamber not involved
  • Stage 3 : defect extends into pulp chamber
  • Stage 4 : significant structure damage of crown
  • Stage 5 : majority of crown lost; roots remaining

 

Your veterinarian will need to examine your dog's teeth for enamel hypocalcification, which will show exposed and stained dentin, and will also test the stability of the dentin. Sound dentin is hard, and will not yield to a dental explorer, whereas carious dentin is soft and will yield to a sharp instrument.

 

If the dentin is exposed, and is lacking in stability, your doctor will look for the cause of this defect. Crown fracture, abrasive wear, attrition with exposed dentin, or extrinsic staining may be some of the possible causes. If the condition has progressed to caries, and especially if it has progressed below the gum-line into the root of the tooth, extraction of the tooth will be the most likely solution for resolving the problem.

 

 

Related Articles

Abnormal Molar Development in Dogs
The abnormal development and formation of the mandibular tooth, a molar located three...
READ MORE
Tooth Fracture in Dogs
Tooth fractures refer to tooth injuries involving damage to the enamel, dentin and...
READ MORE
Gum Disease in Dogs
Periodontal disease is an inflammation of some or all of a tooth’s deep supporting...
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search dog Articles

 

Latest In Dog Nutrition

How Antioxidants Improve Our Pet's Health, ...
The science behind pet nutrition continues to make major advances. One such example...
READ MORE
5 Reasons Life Stage Diets Help Improve Pet ...
Balanced and complete nutrition is important for any animal. However, the nutritional...
READ MORE
How Your Overweight Pet Could Benefit from ...
Pet obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Fortunately, there are some things...
READ MORE
Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM