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UTI Problems and Bladder Infections in Rabbits

Treatment

 

If the bladder or urethra is completely blocked then immediate medical attention is essential, as this can represent a life-threatening emergency. A partial obstruction also requires prompt treatment. Most of the time inpatient care is necessary until the rabbit can urinate freely on its own. The long-term prognosis will depend on the ability of your health provider to restore proper urinary flow.

 

Treatment includes removal of urinary obstructions and restoring proper fluid balance and proper urine outflow. Surgery is sometimes necessary to remove the obstruction. Follow-up treatment will address the causes for the initial urine retention. Because recurrence is possible, it is important to minimize the odds of developing additional kidney stones (if they were present) or future urinary obstructions.

 

Living and Management

 

Reducing or eliminating risk factors for urinary tract obstructions will include making dietary changes, like discontinuing alfalfa pellets from meals. A diet high in fiber and water can helpful for combating and avoiding this condition. Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are also believed to be responsible for urinary tract obstruction. When possible, ensure that your rabbit receives a healthy diet and is able to maintain an active lifestyle in order to help minimize the chance of recurrence.

 

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