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Back Pain in Horses

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About Back Pain

 

Although not the most common injury in horses, back pain can sometimes be a reason for a horse’s grumpiness and unwillingness to move fluidly. With a range of different causes and a spectrum of the anatomy from which to affect (neck to tail), back injuries can sometimes to be a challenge to diagnose and treat.  

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Back pain usually originates from one of two sources: neurological pain, as in a pinched nerve, and musculoskeletal pain. Both of these types may look the same clinically. Often, a horse with back pain will become “sour” under saddle, meaning he becomes unwilling to be ridden, sometimes to the point of not wanting a saddle placed on his back. Other times, the pain is more subtle and a rider may only notice something is wrong when the horse is doing a particular movement, like in dressage or jumping, or another sport requiring tight turns or flexion of the body.

 

Causes

 

  • Traumatic injury
  • Ill-fitted saddle
  • Congenital defect
  • Arthritis of the spine
  • Pinched spinal nerve, as with a slipped disc
  • Tumor of the vertebrae or spinal nerve

 

Diagnosis

 

Your veterinarian may begin to suspect back pain based on your description of your horse’s clinical signs.  Sometimes, back pain may become apparent on physical exam, as your vet palpates down the length of the horse’s spine. Your vet may also ask you to walk and trot your horse in order to observe how your horse is moving, sometimes even with a rider on the horse. A basic neurological exam may also be performed.

 

Locating the precise area of the back that is affected can sometimes be challenging. Further diagnostics such as ultrasound, and even MRI or CT scans are sometimes used. X-rays are rarely used to diagnose back problems, as the abundant musculature along a horse’s back impedes the penetration of the X-ray, resulting in very low quality radiographs.

 

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