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Born With No Anus or Rectum in Foals

Treatment

 

Surgery is needed to create an opening for the anus or to reconstruct the part of the rectum that is missing. This treatment may be costly and usually involves extensive surgery at a large animal hospital.

 

Living and Management

 

Prognosis for this condition depends largely on how badly the foal is affected. Some foals merely lack the external opening of the anus. This can be surgically corrected relatively easily, if the anal sphincter is intact and functional.  Foals that lack a developed sphincter will suffer from fecal incontinence their entire lives. Sometimes this condition causes the small colon and rectum to be abnormally narrow. If this is the case, these foals will be at increased risk of impaction colic in the future. In more severely affected cases, large portions of the rectum and even small colon are missing. These cases do not do well surgically and often the best option is euthanasia for these animals.

 

Prevention

 

As the cause of this congenital defect is not yet known, prevention is not possible.

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