Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

Pet Family

PetMD Seal

Kidney Failure (Long-Term) in Dogs

Chronic Renal Failure in Dogs

 

Nine in every 1,000 dogs that are examined suffer from chronic renal disease. And while dogs of any age can be diagnosed with the kidney disease, it is more commonly seen in older dogs.

 

Failure of the kidney -- which among other things regulates blood pressure, blood sugar, blood volume, water composition in the blood, and pH levels, and produces red blood cells and certain hormones -- can take so place so slowly, that by the time the symptoms have become obvious, it may be too late to treat the condition effectively. Often, the kidney will find ways to compensate as it loses functionality over the course of months, or even years.

 

While chronic renal failure cannot be reversed or cured, treatment and management aimed at reducing the contributing factors and symptoms can slow its progression.

 

Chronic renal failure can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects cats, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

 

Symptoms and Types  

 

Symptoms often occur gradually over an extended petriod of time. In addition, symptoms may vary and not all of those listed below will be seen in every dog:

 

 

Causes  

 

Causes of kidney failure can include kidney disease, urinary blockage (obstruction of the urinary tract or of the ureters), certain prescription medications, lymphoma, diabetes mellitus, and genetic (hereditary) factors.

 

The following breeds are prone to chronic renal failure:

 

 

Diagnosis

 

Your dog will undergo a complete blood profile, including a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis. Dogs with chronic renal failure may have anemia, abnormal electrolyte levels, and elevated blood pressure. The levels of certain protein enzymes and chemicals such as creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) will also be high.

 

Another good indicator of chronic renal failure is urine that is neither concentrated or dilute, thus indicating the kidney's inability to process the urine correctly. X-ray or ultrasound imaging may also be used to observe the size and shape of the dog's kidney(s) to see if there are any visibly noticeable abnormalities. Often, chronic renal failure causes kidneys to become abnormally small.

 

 

 

Related Articles

Urinary Tract Stones/Crystals Made Up of Uric...
Urolithiasis is a medical term referring to the presence of stones or crystals in...
READ MORE
Urinary Tract Obstruction in Dogs
Urinary tract obstruction is a medical emergency causing the cat to strain while...
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search dog Articles

 

Latest In Dog Nutrition

Pet Food Ingredients that Promote Longer Life
Pet foods, in order to promote a healthy long life, must be balanced and complete...
READ MORE
What Are Lean Proteins and How They Can Help ...
Protein is an important component in your pet's food, but not all proteins are the...
READ MORE
Five Life-Lengthening Health Tips for Your ...
Anyone who has ever had a dog or cat wishes just one thing — that he or she has a...
READ MORE
Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM