Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Low Blood Albumin in Dogs

ADVERTISEMENT

Hypoalbuminemia in Dogs

 

When the levels of albumin in a dog's blood serum are abnormally low, it is said to have hypoalbuminemia. A protein formed in the liver and carried into the blood, albumin is responsible for regulating blood volume by controlling pressure in the blood compartment. It is also important for retaining fluid in the vascular compartment. Therefore, a deficiency of albumin can pose grave risks for a dog, including dangerous fluid buildup.

 

Hypoalbuminemia has not been found to occur at any particular age. Moreover, there are no apparent breed or gender predilections.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

  • Abdominal distention
  • Diarrhea and/or vomiting
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swollen limbs
  • Generalized swelling

 

Causes

 

  • Chronic liver disease: chronic hepatitis; cirrhosis
  • Inadequate fluid or food intake - malnutrition/malassimilation
  • Amyloidosis (insoluble proteins are deposited in organs)
  • Glomerulonephritis (a primary or secondary immune-mediated renal disease)
  • Lymphangiectasia (an intestinal disease of dogs)
  • Lymphoma
  • Severe inflammatory bowel disease
  • Histoplasmosis (fungal disease)
  • Oozing sores on the skin
  • Chronic severe blood loss
  • Repeated large volume of fluid in the abdomen
  • Inflammatory effusions:
    • Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas)
    • Peritonitis (inflammation of the lining of the abdomen)
    • Chylous effusions (milky bodily fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fats flowing into cavities where it is not intended to be)
    • Pyothorax (infection in the chest).
    • Vasculopathies (diseases of the blood vessels)
    • Immune mediated
    • Infectious: tick fever, infectious canine hepatitis, sepsis syndrome (infection of the entire body)

 

 

Diagnosis

 

Because there are so many possible causes for this condition, your veterinarian will most likely use differential diagnosis. This process is guided by deeper inspection of the apparent outward symptoms, ruling out each of the more common causes until the correct disorder is settled upon and can be treated appropriately.

 

Before your veterinarian can determine an effective treatment plan, the underlying cause of the low albumin count in the blood stream will need to be conclusively identified. For example, if the cause is severe liver disease, your dog may have all of the symptoms listed. A complete blood analysis and urinalysis will help your doctor to zero in on the cause. Chest and abdominal X-rays may also be required, as well as ultrasound and liver and kidney biopsies. 

 

 

Related Articles

Inflammation of the Pancreas in Dogs
The pancreas is part of the endocrine and digestive system, which is integral for...
READ MORE
Excess Calcium in the Blood in Dogs
Parathyroid hormone and vitamin D interactions work to release calcium from the bones,...
READ MORE
Glycogen Storage Disease in Dogs
Glycogen storage disease, also known as glycogenosis, is characterized by deficient...
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search dog Articles

 

Latest In Dog Nutrition

5 Reasons Life Stage Diets Help Improve Pet ...
Balanced and complete nutrition is important for any animal. However, the nutritional...
READ MORE
What Are Lean Proteins and How They Can Help ...
Protein is an important component in your pet's food, but not all proteins are the...
READ MORE
5 Tips to Keep Your Senior Dog Healthy
Senior dogs have different health requirements than younger dogs. Here are some tips...
READ MORE
Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM