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Hardening and Blockage of the Arteries in Dogs

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Atherosclerosis in Dogs

 

Atherosclerosis is a condition in which lipids (the oily substance that is part of the cell structure), fatty materials, such as cholesterol, and calcium collect along the walls of the arteries (blood vessels that carry oxygen-enriched blood). This buildup is referred to as plaque, and over time results in loss of elasticity, and a narrowing of the lumen (the inner space) of the affected arteries. Over time the deposited fatty material thickens, hardens, and ultimately blocks the arteries, or, it may rupture, causing blood clots to form and travel to other parts of the body. Clots in the arteries of the legs may result in trouble with walking. Generally this condition is uncommon in dogs but has been reported in certain breeds, including the Doberman pinscher, poodle, miniature schnauzer, and Labrador.

 

Risk factors for this disease include age, dogs older than nine years old are at higher risk, and gender. In this case, the male dogs are at higher risk for developing atherosclerosis. The presence of diabetes also plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Following are some of the symptoms related to atherosclerosis in dogs:

 

  • Poor appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Difficult breathing
  • Fainting
  • Generalized weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Blindness
  • Circling
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty with walking – may be concurrent with pain in legs
  • Heart attack

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to provide a thorough history of your dog's health leading up to the onset of symptoms. Your veterinarian will conduct a blood profile, including a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis. For the diagnosis of atherosclerosis other more specific tests may be required depending upon the underlying cause of atherosclerosis. Radiography and ultrasound imaging are also very useful diagnostic tools that can be used to evaluate the heart, liver and other organs. Electrocardiography (ECG) can be used to assess the structure and functional parameters of the heart.

 

 

 

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