Can Dogs Eat Cinnamon?

2 min read

Reviewed for accuracy on November 14, 2019, by Dr. Katie Grzyb, DVM

 

If you're baking up great-smelling snacks like snickerdoodles, pumpkin pie or cinnamon buns, it’s a safe bet that your dog is patiently waiting at your feet in hopes of catching some crumbs.

 

But is cinnamon safe for dogs? Should you be concerned if your pup scarfs down a piece of cookie that fell on the floor, or if they helped themselves to some cinnamon buns?

 

Here’s what you need to know about dogs eating cinnamon.

 

Is Cinnamon Bad for Dogs?

 

The simple answer is that cinnamon is nontoxic to dogs, cats and horses, according to the ASPCA.

 

Of course, you don’t want to feed your dog table scraps or foods that have a large quantity of cinnamon, since this type of people food may leave your pet with an upset stomach.

 

And while the cinnamon might not be toxic to dogs, it’s likely that the same treat contains plenty of other ingredients that are.

 

“Cinnamon isn’t toxic for dogs, but nutmeg can be if consumed in large amounts,” says Dr. Ashley Hughes, DVM. In excessive amounts, nutmeg causes hallucinations and high heart rate in dogs. Interestingly enough, it can have the same impact on people.

 

Your recipe for a decadent treat might contain chocolate along with cinnamon, and chocolate in any amount is an absolute no-no for dogs.

 

And cinnamon buns are often made with raisins and other ingredients that are toxic to dogs, such as raisins or macadamia nuts, says Dr. Hughes.

 

If you want your dog to enjoy a treat, there are plenty of dog biscuits that combine cinnamon with other dog-safe ingredients, like apples, turkey, sweet potatoes and pumpkin.

 

Keeping Your Dog Safe From Food Dangers

 

To be safe, only feed your pet foods and treats made for just them, and don’t feed them seemingly innocent table scraps.

 

Make sure that all houseguests and anyone who is helping in the kitchen, especially, knows not to give your pet any people food. Enlist them to keep an eye out for fallen food that could be dangerous for your pup.

 

By: Vanessa Voltolina

Featured Image: iStock.com/Jennifer_Sharp