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Loss of Appetite in Rabbits

Treatment

 

Anorexia and pseudoanorexia need to be addressed by treating the underlying cause of the condition. No matter what the cause, it is important the rabbit begins eating again as soon as possible. Most rabbits that haven’t been eating regularly suffer from some degree of dehydration and may require the administration of electrolyte-filled fluids. Some medications may also be helpful.

 

On the other hand, symptomatic therapy (treatment of anorexia-related symptoms) may entail the reduction of environmental stressors and a change in the rabbit's diet to encourage eating.

 

Living and Management

 

The patient’s body weight, hydration status, eating habits, and production of fecal pellets should all be monitored regularly. Owners should also be aware of possible complications that may develop, such as malnutrition.

 

If any medications are prescribed, they should be administered regularly. While any further post-treatment care will depends on the cause of the disorder.

 

Prevention

 

As there are many causes leading to anorexia or pseudoanorexia in rabbits, it is difficult to suggest any specific methods of prevention. However, psychological causes of anorexia (a lack of appetite) may be prevented by making sure the rabbit is not put in any stressful environments, and that it receives a tempting, healthy diet and a clean cage.

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