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Tylenol

  • Drug Name: Tylenol
  • Common Name: Tylenol®
  • Drug Type: Analgesic antipyretic
  • Used For: Pain, fever
  • Species: Dogs
  • Administered: Tablet
  • How Dispensed: Prescription or Over the counter
  • FDA Approved: No

General Description

 

Tylenol® is a non-opiate pain relieving drug sometimes given to dogs to relieve pain and fever. Tylenol® is typically a combination of acetaminophen and codeine. It is unusual in that it is unlike non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and does not reduce inflammation. It is typically prescribed to treat mild pain or fevers.

 

Tylenol® is unsafe to use in cats.

 

How It Works

 

Tylenol® by some unknown mechanism, decreases the perception of pain. It is thought that it increases your pet’s threshold for pain. It also reduces your pet’s body temperature by decreasing the effects of pyrogens, which cause fever.

 

Codeine is a narcotic analgesic which is derived from the poppy plant and blocks the pain signals, reducing the pain felt in your pet.

 

Storage Information

 

Store in a tightly sealed container at room temperature.

 

Missed Dose?

 

If you miss a dose, give the dose as soon as possible. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose, and continue with the regular schedule. Do not give your pet two doses at once.

 

Side Effects and Drug Reactions

 

Tylenol® may result in these side effects:

  • Vomiting
  • Depression
  • Lethargy
  • Constipation
  • Loss of appetite
  • Damage to liver
  • Damage to kidney
  • Damage to gastro-intestinal tracts
  • Labored breathing at high doses

 

Tylenol® may be toxic to your pet. In your pet’s body, a small amount typically binds to a glutathione, any lack of which will cause the excess Tylenol® to kill cells. Because cats contain less glutathione than dogs, giving this drug to cats is unsafe.

 

Tylenol® may react with these drugs:

  • Anticholenergic
  • Anticoagulant
  • Diazepam (or any other central nervous system depressant)
  • Corticosteroid
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitor
  • Rimadyl (or any other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug)
  • Ulcerogenic drug
  • Doxorubicin
  • Halothane
  • Naloxone

 

DO NOT ADMINISTER THIS DRUG TO CATS - Use with extreme caution and only with the recommendation of an experienced veterinarian. It may cause severe side effects and death in cats.

 

USE CAUTION WHEN ADMINISTERING THIS DRUG TO DOGS - Use with caution and only with the recommendation of an experienced veterinarian.

 

USE CAUTION WHEN ADMINISTERING THIS DRUG TO DOGS THAT HAVE JUST UNDERGONE SURGERY, PETS WITH INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTIONS, OLDER DOGS, OR DOGS WITH LIVER DISEASE, HYPERTHYROIDISM, ADDISON’S DISEASE, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE, HEAD TRAUMA, EPILEPSY, OR HEART ABNORMALITIES

 

USE CAUTION WHEN ADMINISTERING THIS DRUG TO PREGNANT OR LACTATING DOGS

 


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