http://www.petmd.com/news/rss en Kitten Survives 130-Mile Trek in a Car's Engine Compartment http://www.petmd.com/news/cat/kitten-survives-130-mile-trek-cars-engine-compartment-34199







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Kitten Survives 130-Mile Trek in a Car's Engine Compartment


By Aly Semigran    May 25, 2016 at 09:46AM / (0) comments










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It's rare that getting a flat tire can be considered a blessing in disguise, but that was exactly the case for a kitten who was found inside the hood of a car in Birmingham, Ala. 
 
When a family traveling from Atlanta, Ga. hit a pothole, it caused their car to get a flat, which prompted them to call the Jefferson County police in Birmingham for assistance. Once help arrived, Sheriff Deputy Tim Sanford noticed their was a faint cry coming from the vehicle's engine compartment. 
 
After opening the hood of the car, Deputy Sandord discovered a tiny kitten stuck inside. The small feline was likely trapped in there for 130 miles. 
 
Sanford (pictured above with the lucky feline he rescued) named the kitten, fittingly, Atlanta, and then called the Animal Care and Control (ACC) division of the Greater Birmingham Humane Society for further help in rehabilitating her. 
 
Despite some burns from the engine (which are already healing), Atlanta is in good shape. According to the GBHS, Atlanta will be held for a state-mandated stray hold period and then taken to Alabama Shelter Veterinarians to be spayed, vaccinated, dewormed, microchipped and given a full medical evaluation. She'll then be placed up for adoption.  
 
Holly Baker, the director of ACC, tells petMD that the inspiring Atlanta is "thriving" health-wise and has a "spunky personality" to boot. While Atlanta may be the poster kitty for resilience, she's also a reminder, particularly during the busy summer travel season, to always be aware of animals when you are traveling. 
 
"It is more common to see cats inside of cars in the winter, but not unusual for any time of year," Baker says. "If you see an animal in distress, please call local law enforcement and alert them to the situation. They will alert the proper animal control authorities."
 
Baker also reminds pet lovers that as temperatures rise, it's especially important to be mindful of animals and cars. "Do NOT leave animals in a hot car," she says. "If outside, ensure you have plenty of fresh water for your pets and find shade if they become overheated. If it’s too hot for you, it is definitely too hot for them!" 
 
Image via Greater Birmingham Humane Society 





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How This Groundbreaking Children's Book is Helping Families Cope With the Loss of a Pet http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/how-groundbreaking-book-helping-families-cope-loss-pet-34192







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How This Groundbreaking Children's Book is Helping Families Cope With the Loss of a Pet


By Aly Semigran    May 23, 2016 at 03:31PM / (0) comments










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"How am I going to explain this to my kids?" 
 
It's a question that Dr. Corey Gut, DVM, was asked a lot in her line of work by pet parents who were faced with the loss of their beloved animal. 
 
The question became a personal endeavor for Dr. Gut to help answer when her sister's dog Bailey was diagnosed with liver cancer. "My sister’s daughter, my niece Lexi, was extremely attached to this dog and at the time she was an only child and very young and this was going to be her first experience with death," Gut tells petMD.
 
When her sister discovered there were limited resources to help parents out in this situation, Gut wrote a book specifically for her niece called Being Brave For Bailey. A family project in every sense of the word (Gut's mother provided the illustrations for the book), she began altering the book for different patients and their families to help them through their own time of grief. 
 
The book was striking a nerve with families who were looking for ways to help their children understand what was happening, and to let them properly mourn. With that, Gut (who works at DePorre Animal Hospital in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.) launched a successful Kickstarter campaign to make the book accessible to everyone, and since then, Being Brave For Bailey has been making an impact in households and libraries across the country. Gut says she has received countless thank you letters, emails, and cards from pet parents all over expressing their gratitude. Gut saves all of these tokens in a binder. 
 
"The response has been amazing and it’s such an emotional thing for me because, I’m sure as every veterinarian can agree, one of the most difficult things we deal with is euthanasia," she says. "You feel so desperate, so helpless—you want to make everything okay.” 
 
Being Brave For Bailey follows the journey of a child's relationship with her dog from a young age, to the dog getting older and sicker, to, eventually, the always difficult decision to end the dog's life. Gut (pictured below with her dog Vinnie) says the inclusion of euthanasia was important to include because, "That’s very hard for someone of any age, but [it's especially difficult] for a child to understand the concept.” 
 

 
Gut, who collaborated with licensed therapists and guidance counselors on the project, explains that one of the most important factors in helping a child through this, is to have them be part of the process. "Children can often resent their parents for the decision being made," Gut says, but by allowing them to have some control in the situation, it becomes "extremely therapeutic for them." 
 
For instance, a parent can ask a child for their input on matters like what kind of tree should be planted in the pet's honor, or what object (be it a bone or a blanket) should be buried with the animal. 
 
The vet also points out that language is important when it comes to talking to kids about this heartbreaking subject. Rather than phrases like 'Put to sleep,' it's better to use words like 'dead' or 'death' to avoid future confusion. Same goes for the 'Dog went to the farm' routine. Gut acknowledges that parents are doing their best and protecting their children's feelings, but in the long run, using succinct and direct phrases can serve as a healthy and valuable tool throughout life. 
 
While Gut says that every family's channels of communication are different, she hopes the book can "leave that avenue open" for honest discussions about how they are feeling. 
 
She tells petMD that while she's had requests for a cat version of the book, the response has, overwhelmingly been positive from all types of pet owners of every age range. "This has been an amazing experience, all around for me, helping families through such a tough issue.” 
 
Being Brave For Bailey is available for purchase and/or donation through the book's official website. 
 
Images via Jaime Meyers; Jim Hoover





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A Rescue Cat's Broken Jaw Was Repaired and Now Resembles a Permanent Smile http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/rescue-cats-broken-jaw-repaired-and-now-resembles-permanent-smile-34191







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A Rescue Cat's Broken Jaw Was Repaired and Now Resembles a Permanent Smile


By Aly Semigran    May 23, 2016 at 10:24AM / (0) comments










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Duchess, who has become something of an Internet celebrity and is known as the 'Miracle Kitty,' has plenty to smile about these days. Not only is the rescue cat—who was found very badly hurt—now living in a safe and loving forever home, but she's recovering wonderfully thanks to the dedicated staff of the Adobe Animal Hospital and Clinic in El Paso, Texas.    
 
Last October, the Siamese cat was brought into the facility clinging to life after a concerned citizen found her injured and suffering outside of an apartment complex. "The cause of her injuries was unknown," Bryan Meyer, DVM, of the Adode Animal Hospital and Clinic tells petMD. "Being hit by a car is likely, but abuse could not be ruled out as there were no other injuries or evidence of being hit by a car. The only trauma was to the face/head."    
 
Meyer explains that the cat's jaw was completely dislocated on the left side, but the major injury was "a comminuted fracture to the ramus [a portion of a bone] of her right mandible." Duchess was also very malnourished and covered in scars.
 
Euthanasia was initially considered for the cat (who is estimated to be around 3-years-old) because she was a stray with such extensive injuries. Duchess required multiple surgeries, with no guarantee of recovery.
 
Still, the staff at Adobe couldn't help but feel this feline was a fighter and wanted to give her a second chance at life. "Something about her instantly tugged on our heartstrings," Meyer says. "She would constantly purr, look at us with those crossed eyes, and rubbed up on everyone so lovingly; even with the pain she was in." 
 
With that—after she had been stabilized with pain medications, antibiotics, and IV fluid therapy—the vets decided to move on with her surgery. 
 
"We wired the front part of her mandible together to repair the fractured symphysis," Meyer tells us. "Then the real challenge began, attempting to repair her shattered ramus. Working with limited resources for this extensive repair, we were able to wire a small piece of bone of the ramus to the body of the mandible. This type of repair was not done to restore function of the jaw, but rather to stabilize the fractured area and allow it to heal." 
 
The kitty's prognosis was still not in the clear, but after giving her a feeding tube and maintaining post-op care, the hopes were still high for her. After spending a month in the hospital, Duchess learned to eat on her own by consuming a "soup" of food mixed with water created by the staff. Eventually, Duchess underwent a second procedure to remove some of her teeth because they were irritating her tongue and causing swelling. 
 
But even through all this, Meyer says that Duchess maintained a good attitude and was always striving to get stronger and better by the day.
 
Once she recovered from her procedures, Duchess—whose repaired jaw remains crooked—was able to be adopted, and was eventually taken into the care of a loving family who understands exactly what is needed to care for this remarkable and resilient cat. 
 
Meyer tells petMD that there are no long-term issues related to Duchess's injuries, and that follow-up procedures have been discussed, but may not be necessary. 
 
"At this point, we would need to perform a CT scan of the skull to fully analyze the area of fracture and healing. Once a CT scan has been performed, we can consult with a surgical specialist to see if any further surgeries could be done to correct the damage," he says. "Regardless of what happens, we know that she has a long, happy life ahead of her."
 
Image via Duchess the Miracle Kitty Facebook 





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How to Live With, Train, and ‘Talk’ to a Deaf Dog http://www.petmd.com/news/view/how-live-train-and-talk-deaf-dog-34189









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How to Live With, Train, and ‘Talk’ to a Deaf Dog


By Bernard Lima-Chavez    May 23, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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By Bernard Lima-Chavez
 
The very idea of living with and training a deaf dog can feel overwhelming. Here are some practical tips to help get you started.
 
I’m a bit obsessed with deaf dogs. It started four years ago when we agreed to foster a deaf, ten-week old puppy for the weekend. Fast forward a few years and that puppy, now named Edison, weighs ninety-two pounds and is still sleeping in our bed. Actually, he sleeps anywhere he chooses.
 
Since that weekend, we have adopted a second deaf dog and have learned many things from our experiences. Whether the subject is communication, training, or safety, there is one guiding principle: living with a deaf dog is different, not harder.
 
If you’ve discovered that your recently adopted dog can’t hear, this lowdown on living with a deaf dog is for you.
 
Communicating With Deaf Dogs
 
It’s important to remember that while we depend on our voice, dogs use their bodies to communicate. Once we flip a switch in our brain and begin to talk with our bodies—you know, like a dog—communication becomes simple.
 
Training Deaf Dogs
 
When training a deaf dog, having a plan and using positive reinforcement techniques are key. The first step is to make a list of the commands that are most important to you; however, basic obedience and “watch me” should definitely be on your list.
 
The next step is to pick your hand signs. You can use a formal signed language, such as American Sign Language, obedience commands, or you can make up your own. Choose signs that are easy for you to remember but keep in mind that one-handed signs are the most practical, especially when holding a leash.
 
How to Avoid Startling Deaf Dogs
 
Because some deaf dogs may startle when touched from behind or while sleeping, it is important to condition your dog to being touched unexpectedly. Start by gently waking him up while he’s sleeping. Lightly touch him on his shoulder and immediately offer a treat when he wakes up. Your deaf dog will quickly learn that being touched unexpectedly isn’t something to fear.
 
Outdoor Safety for Deaf Dogs
 
It may not be sexy, but deaf dog safety is critically important. A loose deaf dog on the run is a disaster waiting to happen, but being proactive and alert can go a long way toward preventing a tragedy.
 
First, never let your deaf dog off leash in an unfenced area. You should also regularly check the fencing around your home to make sure that there are no escape hatches. And it’s also a good idea to keep your front and back doors closed and locked at all times—I learned this the hard way!
 
Since dogs can pull out of their collars, use a harness when walking your dog. When out in public, be aware of changes in your environment so you can let your deaf dog know that a car is coming or when another dog is running up to say hi!
 
*
 
For more information about adoptable deaf dogs, please visit Dog & His Boy or Deaf Dogs Rock.
 
 
Image provided by Bernard Lima-Chavez
 





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Rey the Blind Cat: A Reminder That All Felines Are Resilient and Worthy of a Loving Home http://www.petmd.com/news/cat/rey-blind-cat-34186









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Rey the Blind Cat: A Reminder That All Felines Are Resilient and Worthy of a Loving Home


By Aly Semigran    May 18, 2016 at 09:41AM / (0) comments










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Rey the cat is poised to be the next social media sensation, and it's not just because she's adorable and fun to watch. (Which she totally is.) 
 
The kitty—who is, fittingly, named after the butt-kicking heroine from the Star Wars saga—is blind, but she doesn't let that stop her from living a happy, healthy feline life. Rey, who lives alongside her fellow adopted cat siblings Leia and Georgie, is the furbaby of cat dad Alex from Chicago, Ill. 
 
Rey, who was born blind and whose eye sockets were closed in order to avoid infections, is described by her cat dad as being sweet, gentle, and caring. He notes that she is also playful and has an appetite for life—and for turkey. Rey's kitty adventures are captured on her social media pages, from her Facebook to her Instagram. "I love having her company and I am loving the support that I am receiving through the Internet community for her," Alex tells petMD. "It makes me have more hope for humanity seeing all the positive comments and messages she gets on her social media pages."
 
Her fanbase is growing by the day, thanks to photos of squee-worthy playtimes with her cat siblings to aww-inducing cuddles with her owner. 
 
"My favorite thing about being Rey's dad is that I get the opportunity to show the world that special and unique animals like her are more than worth adopting and loving," says Alex. "I feel very lucky to own and care for such an amazing creature. She reminds me to never give up." 
 
Despite being blind, Rey is fearless and is constantly learning what her limitations are and how to adjust them accordingly. "It's amazing to watch her," he says. "She must have a complete map of my apartment in her head along with dimensions of most of the furniture we have here. She jumps up and down from most objects in the house." 
 
Alex notes that he is careful about where he puts things in the apartment so that she doesn't run into them or hurt herself. He also picks her up very slowly so that she is not surprised by him. 
 
He mentions that occasionally Rey will have to be helped at the litter box, but it's a small price to pay for having such an amazing kitty. As Alex puts it, "Rey has brought me and my two human roommates inspiration and joy that makes our apartment feel full of life."
 
For anyone thinking about getting a pet with special needs like Rey, Dr. Elizabeth McKinstry, VMD, advises that pet parents with a blind cat (whether the cat was born blind or has gone blind) keep things in order for the feline. “If you don’t move the furniture, they can get along really, really well," she says. She also notes that "food and water should be easily accessible," particulary if the cat is not good at jumping or climbing. 
 
Image via @reythekitten 





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http://www.petmd.com/news/cat/rey-blind-cat-34186#comments cat cats Lifestyle & Entertainment Wed, 18 May 2016 13:41:51 +0000 34186 at http://www.petmd.com
Heroic German Shepherd Fights Off Rattlesnake, Endures Three Bites To Save Little Girl http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/heroic-german-shepherd-fights-snake-endures-three-bites-save-little-gir-34173









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Heroic German Shepherd Fights Off Rattlesnake, Endures Three Bites To Save Little Girl


By Aly Semigran    May 16, 2016 at 02:36PM / (0) comments










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When an eastern diamondback rattlesnake was dangerously close to a 7-year-old girl in a yard in Tampa, Fla., the family's dog, a 2-year-old German Shepherd named Haus jumped in to save the day.    
 
According to ABC News, the dog "stood his ground" against the venomous snake in the DeLuca family's backyard, ensuring the snake got nowhere near the child. Unfortunately, the dangerous predator—the largest venomous snake in North America—bit the brave pet three times in the leg. 
 
Badly injured and in pain, the dog was rushed by his family to the BluePearl Veterinary facility in Tampa, Fla.
 
"The injuries were quite extensive," says Dr. John Gicking, a certified care specialist who took care of Haus. "His entire right front leg was affected, as was his blood and kidneys. This was definitely a life-threatening situation."  
 
In order to save his life, doctors treated Haus with anti-venom, pain medications, IV fluids, and a red blood cell transfusion. Luckily, the prognosis for Haus is hopeful.    
 
"The good news is, Haus is doing extremely well," Gicking tells petMD. "He's eating and walking like a champ. We've stopped the anti-venom and so far there are no problems. His blood work is improving every day."    
 
Haus will require follow-ups, including care for the swollen wounds on his leg, but Gicking is confident in Haus' ability to recover. "Tt's looking pretty likely that Haus won't suffer any long-term effects from the bites," he says.    
 
Haus' medical needs following the attack quickly added up for the DeLuca family, but thanks to an effort on GoFundMe, donations poured in and more than doubled the requested amount to help Haus get back on his feet. (In fact, now that the family has gone over their goal, they are asking well-wishers to donate future funds to Heidi's Legacy Dog Rescue.) 
 
"It's been really nice to see people from all over the world support Haus," Gicking says.    
 
Pet parents should take precautions when dealing with snakes, Gicking tells us. "Pet parents should take care to avoid areas where there may be snakes," he says. "Also, if you know you live in an area where snakes are common, it's best to keep pets on a leash."    
 
Gicking says that the most important thing a pet parent can do if their dog or cat has been bitten is to seek emergency veterinary care immediately.
 
"That was the most important element in Haus' recovery—his owners rushed him to an emergency veterinarian right away so he could be treated with anti-venom as quickly as possible."  
 
Image via GoFundMe 





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Are Alternative Medicines for Cancer Modern Day Snake Oils? http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/are-alternative-medicines-cancer-modern-day-snake-oils-34161









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Are Alternative Medicines for Cancer Modern Day Snake Oils?


By Joanne Intile    May 16, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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Have you ever heard of snake oil? It's an expression generally reserved for unproven remedies for various ailments or maladies, but is also often used to describe any product with questionable or unverifiable benefit.
 
Chinese workers, building the First Transcontinental Railroad in the mid-19th century, used snake oil to treat the painful inflammatory joint conditions resulting from their labors.
 
The workers began sharing the tonic with their American counterparts, who marveled at the positive effects it had on ailments such as arthritis and bursitis. Rich in the omega-3 fatty acids that are now known to possess anti-inflammatory properties, Chinese snake oil likely provided some comfort for workers experiencing job-related soreness and swelling.
 
Looking to capitalize on the financial gain, American “healers” gave their Chinese counterparts a bad name when they developed their own “snake oil” concoctions, which they claimed provided equal benefits to the Chinese remedies, yet lacked the necessary ingredients.
 
Over time, the term “snake oil” has become synonymous with substances whose ingredients are considered proprietary and marketed to provide a miraculous cure-all for a variety of maladies. Unfortunately, I can’t help but think about the phrase when pet owners ask me about complementary or alternative medicine treatment options for pets with cancer.
 
Many owners discover information which suggests the beneficial effects of various herbs, anti-oxidants, “immune boosting treatments,” and dietary supplements via searching the internet.
 
The more common products owners will inquire about include Tumexal, Apocaps, K9 Immunity, K9 Transfer factor, coconut oil, turmeric, essiac tea, and wormwood products (Artemisinin). A primary appeal is these substances are touted as “natural” and “non-toxic,” making their usage relatively inarguable.
 
What most owners fail to recognize is that supplements and herbal products are not subject to the same regulations by the FDA that prescription drugs are. Owners are also unaware that carefully worded claims to efficacy are not backed up by scientific research in the vast majority of cases, despite the plethora of supportive testimonials listed on product inserts or on websites.
 
One of the most popular products I’m asked about is K9 Immunity, a dietary supplement manufactured by Aloha Medicinals, reportedly “the industry’s leading company in the cultivation of medicinal mushroom species.” The product’s website includes several impressive logos: USDA organic, Quality Assurance International Certified Organic, and even one for the Food and Drug Association (FDA) as well as sweeping statements related to an ability to “strengthen and balance your dog’s immune system so the body recognizes and destroys damaged cells” and an assurance that the product “has no known side effects.”
 
This latter statement is my biggest concern with the animal supplement industry; the lure of alternative and complementary options centering on the ideology that these options are benign. Countless times, owners mistakenly assume these products have undergone testing to determine purity, safety, and efficacy. Despite the lack of specific data proving these products are bioavailable, safe, and/or effective in pets (other than what is put forth on their respective websites), owners elect such treatments.
 
With minimal probing, I discovered a warning letter from the FDA addressed to Aloha Medicinal dated 4/6/10 outlining numerous violations the company made regarding potential beneficial claims related to several of their manufactured products. Yes, this example is out dated; however smart owners have to consider what it means.
 
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is the organization tasked with protecting, promoting, and advancing a strong, unified veterinary profession that meets the needs of society. Within their code of ethics you will find the following statement:
 
“It is unethical for veterinarians to promote, sell, prescribe, dispense, or use secret remedies or any other product for which they do not know the ingredients.”
 
This simple sentence provides me with the entire pause I need when it comes to the owner asking whether or not a particular supplement would help their pet. I cannot, and I will not, promote such a thing until the data tells me to do so.
 
My concern is that “alternative” products are marketed as panaceas. We cannot accurately report efficacy because the substances were never scrutinized in any sort of clinical trials (despite the hundreds to thousands of animals they are stated to be helpful for); it’s all anecdotes and testimonials.
 
I believe many of the companies marketing these supplements are preying on the emotions of owners who are desperate for a shred of hope. This isn’t a new concept, the internet just makes it easier for them to do so.
 
What is often most difficult for owners to understand is that words like “miraculous” play no role in medicine. I’m not arguing against the existence of outliers—there will always be patients who live longer than we expect. Conversely, there will be many who succumb to disease before their time. However, products should refrain from including unrealistic claims and using words such as “cure” or “prevent.” Likewise, they shouldn’t only report testimonials and should offer scientific data supporting their assertions.
 
Complementary treatments work alongside conventional ones, whereas alternative treatments act as a substitute for them. I adhere to the ideology that there is no alternative medicine. “Alternative medicine” that works is called medicine, period.
 





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Shelter Dog Gives Birth To 16 Healthy Puppies...On Mother's Day http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/pointer-mix-gives-birth-16-healthy-puppieson-mothers-day-34160







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Shelter Dog Gives Birth To 16 Healthy Puppies...On Mother's Day


By Aly Semigran    May 12, 2016 at 02:10PM / (0) comments










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Maggie the Pointer Mix may just be the Mother of the Year. This wonder dog not only gave birth to a litter of puppies on Mother's Day, but she delivered 16 healthy, happy babies.          
 
At just roughly 8-months-old, the very pregnant Maggie was brought into the Suncoast SPCA in New Port Richey, Fla. after a local animal control center was not able to properly house and care for the expectant dog. Maggie was only with Suncoast for about two days when she went into labor in the late hours of May 7. Then, after midnight, Maggie began to give birth.        
 
Kerrianne Farrow, the Executive Director of the Suncoast SPCA, tells petMD that Maggie, ever the trooper, wasn't in labor very long. In fact, she was done by about 4 in the morning that Mother's Day.    
 
Still, the staff at Suncoast had no idea just how many puppies Maggie was expecting because no X-rays were taken. "We figured she was having 8 or 9 [puppies] because she had a pretty big belly, but they just kept coming," Farrow says with a laugh.    
 
Amazingly enough, the whole thing was caught on camera thanks to Petcube, which continues to stream the family's first days and weeks together. Some cute moments that have already been captured by Farrow and co. include one of the particularly cute and rambunctious babies (who they've dubbed a "Beefcake") waking up from a nap and quickly running over to be with his mother.          
 
“The puppies are doing fantastic, and mom is doing great as well. They are definitely thriving at this time," Farrow says, adding, that they are all at healthy weights. They've even worked out a system for the pups for feeding by splitting them up in solids and stripes teams. "That way when we weigh them everyday we can keep track and rotate out between bottles," she explains.    
 
Maggie the mama (who Farrow describes as "the sweetest dog") and her pups are currently staying at the home of the facility's medical manager. This was done in order to avoid any issues that may arrive, including kennel cough.    
 
However, when the pups are old enough to be vaccinated, spayed, neutered, and microchipped they'll be brought back to the Suncoast facility where they'll be available for adoption to be placed in a loving forever home. 
 
Image via Suncoast SPCA Facebook 





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Paw-ternity Leave: Will This UK Pet Parent Trend Make Its Way To The States? http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/paw-ternity-leave-will-uk-pet-parent-trend-make-its-way-states-34159









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Paw-ternity Leave: Will This UK Pet Parent Trend Make Its Way To The States?


By Aly Semigran    May 10, 2016 at 09:18AM / (4) comments










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When the New York Post ran an article stating that "Pet Owners Deserve Family Leave, Too" it prompted a flurry of responses, especially from pet parents who wondered why they haven't yet been offered time off to take care of their fur babies.    
 
As it turns out, paw-ternity leave, like maternity leave, gives employees paid time off to take care of their newest family member. But, for now, it appears that this trend is only happening for pet parents in the UK. This news doesn't surprise Cynthia Trumpey, the senior vice president of pet acquisition at Healthy Paws Pet Insurance, who noticed that our friends across the pond tend to start these trends.    
 
"The [paw-ternity] movement started in the UK...and now a few companies in the US are picking up on the idea," Trumpey says. "It's the way that it happened with pet insurance as well. If you look at pet insurance in the UK, it’s much more popular there than it is in the U.S."    
 
Natasha Ashton the co-founder and co-CEO of Petplan, thinks that the demand for paw-ternity leave, like insurance, will become greater here in the US. "I wouldn’t be surprised to see U.S. companies offer time off to employees who bring home a new pet," she tells petMD. 
 
Ashton notes that a lot of companies—in addition to pet insurance (which is the third most requested and fastest growing voluntary employee benefit)—are now offering pet bereavement time. 
 
"I think what this all tells us is that more companies are recognizing that pets are part of the family and they’re extending benefits to employees that include even the furriest family members," Ashton points out. "Time off for a new pet would be a natural next step." 
 
While some companies do allow their employees to bring pets to work, for some that is simply not an option. Ashton also points out that those first critical days and weeks of having a new pet in the household requires time and attention. 
 
"Most of that first week at home with a new pet is dedicated to house training, socializing, and veterinary check-ups," Ashton notes. "It’s also a great time for the family and pet to bond with each other as well as for the new pet to meet any pets who are already in the home. And as anyone who’s ever brought home a young puppy can attest, those early weeks are also filled with some sleepless nights."
 
With an estimated 65% of households in the US that own pets, paw-ternity leave could very well be something we adopt from the UK and take in as our own. 
 
Would you ask your employer for paw-ternity leave? Would it have helped you when you had a new pet? Tell us in the comments section below. 
 
Image via Shutterstock 





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papoodles Paws-itively ridiculous.. 05/20/2016 07:58am What?? Ridiculous concept; use vacation time if you need to take care of personal business.. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1 siscoluis0919UKduke 05/21/2016 09:38pm No not ridiculous at all, we should not have to take our vacation time & we should have two weeks of paw-ternity leave! Pets are family members, just like kids are!@ Reply to this comment Report abuse 1 Crysania Not so sure about that... 05/20/2016 08:18am I'm iffy on this. On one hand, I understand the need to bond with a new pet. I've generally taken off a few days of work when I've brought a new dog home. But at the same time, that's what vacation time is for. It may be a different story for folks who don't GET vacation time and would have to take it off without pay, but ultimately a dog or cat is a choice (of course, one could argue, so are children).

On the flip side, you know what I WOULD like to see? Bereavement time. Even just one day to be able to say goodbye, etc. I mean, I could take a day of bereavement leave for an aunt or uncle who I have basically nothing to do with but because they're a relative, I get that bereavement time. But I couldn't get a day of bereavement leave for a beloved dog, who is a member of my family? Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 FL2NC I could see this for some 05/20/2016 09:36am D I don't think it would be equal to maternity leave length and time. However depend on the size of the company (larger companies giving more time), I believe that one to two weeks would be a great benefit. Gives one time to bond, help with separation anxiety training, house trained and crate train, vet visits, etc. However, there should be a balance of amount of time one could do this suggest as only three times in 10 years. I don't want to see this benefit being abused like some mothers having a baby every year or so, which puts a burden on the company. The limit would also stop those that get puppies then get the time off then later get rid of that dog and go back to the shelter to get more time off. This program would have to encourage responsible pet ownership. Question would be how far does this apply to e.g. Cats, lizards, rabbits, snake etc. I definitely like the ideas of pet bereavement. I found it hard the day after putting down my first dog, a Dobie at 12 years, then going to work as a police officer and keeping my mind on the job. Reply to this comment Report abuse 2


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Meow the Force Be With You: Meet the Animal Shelter Cat That Looks Like Yoda http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/meow-force-be-you-meet-animal-shelter-cat-looks-yoda-34135









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Meow the Force Be With You: Meet the Animal Shelter Cat That Looks Like Yoda


By Aly Semigran    May 05, 2016 at 01:19PM / (0) comments










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It's fitting that a cat who looks like Yoda would be wise, kind, and a hit on the Internet, as is the case with this animal shelter kitty who shares the same name as the Star Wars character he resembles. 
 
Yoda is a 3-year-old half-Sphynx who was taken to the Christian County Animal Shelter in Hopkinsville, Kentucky by a neighboring shelter when he was found in a live trap. Concerned that he might have health issues, the CCAS took Yoda in as their own and this former stray found his home in the comfort of the shelter, with an entire staff that works as his family. (Yoda even has a roommate, a Beagle named Roscoe, who also lives at the shelter.) 
 
Irene Grace, the Director of CCAS, tells petMD that Yoda—who is referred to as the facility's mascat—is not only a source of therapy and stress relief, but he helps around the office, too. His morning routine includes checking out the front counter and the other cats and then, after hours, helping to catch mice and keep the shelter pest-free.
 
"He's great," Grace says of the shelter companion, adding, that he's a calming presence, but also playful. (In fact, one of Yoda's favorite activities is to bat around lollipop's found on Grace's desk.) 
 
While Yoda has no major health issues, because he is mostly hairless and has folded skin, he'll get pimples around his chin and neck, which is remedied with antibiotics. 
 
Thanks to Yoda's unusual features, he's quickly becoming something of an Internet celebrity. (The Internet, in case you hadn't heard, loves Star Wars.)
 
Grace hopes that Yoda's newfound fame will shed a positive light on shelters everywhere. "I think it's wonderful that [Yoda] shows all the good that shelters do." She also hopes that Yoda will inspire future pet parents to look at older and/or "different" cats to give a loving home. 
 
Awesome cat, he is. 
 
Photo via Yoda the Christian Community Animal Shelter Mascat Facebook 





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Skinny Vinnie the Dachshund: From Overweight to Inspiration http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/skinny-vinnie-dachshund-overweight-inspiration-34085









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Skinny Vinnie the Dachshund: From Overweight to Inspiration


By Aly Semigran    April 29, 2016 at 09:11AM / (0) comments










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Most stories of weight loss will motivate people to change their diets and get exercising, but how often do they inspire us to go out and adopt a dog that needs our love? That's where Skinny Vinnie the Dachshund comes in. 
 
Vinnie's story, while happy now, had an ultimately sad start. After his former owner passed away, the 8-year-old Dachshund could not be taken care of and would have been put down. Because of his frame at an unhealthy 40 pounds with a BMI of roughly 67%, Vinnie was deemed unadoptable. That was, until, he was taken to the K-9 Angels Rescue in Houston, Texas, and volunteer Melissa Anderson took him in. 
 
Anderson tells petMD that despite his disadvantages, Vinnie was motivated to get moving and shed the pounds. In fact, as she recalls, "He ran to my car." 
 
Vinnie's foster mom, who said she "couldn't believe" the dog's overweight frame when she first saw him, says that his transformation was due to his positive energy. "He had such a good attitude, and he really has kept that attitude the whole time. He always wants to go on a walk. Even when he couldn’t really walk, he wanted to go.”
 
"[Vinnie] would only walk about 10 yards from the house and sit for the first month, but as time went on, he got further down the road," says his vet Sharon Anderson, DVM, of the Memorial Vet Clinic in Houston. "I now see him in the neighborhood making the 2.5 mile loop with Mom and her other dachshunds. He was supposed to lose only 0.5 lbs per week, but he ended up losing a little faster."
 
Vinnie—who is considered somewhere between a miniature Dachshund and a standard Dachshund—is now down to a healthy 16.8 pounds, the weight a dog his size should be. Still, because of the excess weight he carried, he had some health issues. "Vinnie has very bad periodontal disease," says Anderson. "His cholesterol was high, he had a hyperechoic liver on ultrasound—more than likely a fatty liver—but the rest of his labs were normal."
 
Anderson says that Vinnie will continue to have dental issues, but despite some loose skin from his weight loss, he is otherwise healthy now. It's especially amazing when you consider the health concerns that can arise when a pet is overweight, including diabetes, joint problems, breathing problems, and urinary tract issues. 
 
Thanks to a special diet (which started with formula, and then eventually moved on to wet food and kibble) and exercise (which included swimming), his foster helped get Vinnie to be where he is today. 
 
Anderson tells petMD that while Vinnie may be smaller now, his heart is just as big. She says the fun-loving dog is much more jovial now that he lost the weight. "You know, we CAN really tell when pets are happy, and he is a much happier little dog" she says.
 
While Vinnie's incredible transformation and his own determination to shed the pounds is an inspiration in and of itself, what Anderson really hopes people take away from his story is that there are great dogs like Vinnie out there who deserve a second chance at life. 
 
Anderson hopes that Vinnie inspires dog lovers to help out a canine at their local shelter who may be otherwise overlooked. "It might take a little work, but they might be a perfect dog, and they’re waiting there.”
 
Image via K-9 Angels Rescue 
 
 





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Hermaphrodite Kitten Wins Hearts Worldwide http://www.petmd.com/news/adoption/hermaphrodite-kitten-uk-33994









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Hermaphrodite Kitten Wins Hearts Worldwide


By Aly Semigran    April 20, 2016 at 01:13PM / (8) comments










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When Bellini the kitten was brought to the St Helen’s Adoption Centre of Cats Protection in the U.K., it was initially thought that the tiny 9-week-old cat was male.
 
But, after the cat was brought in to be neutered, it was discovered by a veterinarian at the facility that the kitty possessed both male and female genitalia. Since then, the adoracle kitty has captured the attention of people worldwide. 
 
In a press release on the Cat Protection website, manager Sonia Scowcroft noted how rare it is to see a hermaphroditc cat and stated. "I was pretty stunned, it’s so unusual," she said. "I have seen over 3,000 cats during my time at Cats Protection and only seen one other hermaphrodite cat." 
 
"Hermaphrodite – or intersex – cats do not frequently occur and, if they do, they are often tortoiseshell so Bellini is one of the more unusual cats to be found," Louise Waters of Cats Protection told petMD, who explained that it is something that develops when cats are in-vitro. 
 
Scowcroft also stated that while it will be impossible for Bellini to reproduce, he is an otherwise happy and healthy cat, despite a mild heart murmur. Waters added that each case with hermaphroditic cats is different and unique, so Bellini's new owners will have to check in with their vet to "ensure that s/he remains healthy." 
 
Luckily, Cats Protection was able to re-home Bellini alongside a littermate named Daquiri. Scowcroft pointed out that when it comes to assigning a gender, "it is up to his new owner to decide what they think is best."
 
"Either way," Scowcroft said, "[Bellini] is an absolute cutie pie and will make a really lovely pet."
 
Image via Cats Protection 





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Stsmmd Correction 05/01/2016 01:38pm "when cats are in-vitro." I think the author meant to write "when cats are in utero" Reply to this comment Report abuse 22 johny1 05/23/2016 12:31pm No. He did mean in-vitro Reply to this comment Report abuse BT143 05/25/2016 11:53pm I am pretty sure the kitty was not generated in a test tube. Accordingly, the condition developed in utero NOT in vitro. you should look things up before posting something that is embarrassing to yourself. Reply to this comment Report abuse dhstewartjames@gmail.com hmmm 05/01/2016 08:53pm Which litterbox should he/she use?
Reply to this comment Report abuse 103 Etta Earlene 05/17/2016 01:07pm Which cat box to choose....depends on what mindset the kitty has. Feeling pretty today?...then "girls" of course. Kind of growlie and ready to throw its weight around or pick a fight?...then "boys" for sure...."This statement has been submitted for entertainment purposes only!" Reply to this comment Report abuse 15 Azar Attura 05/18/2016 11:10am MOL!! I had one GROWLY gurliecat that everyone (even the vets!! After 17 years??!!) thought was a guycat-- as for which litterbox she used -- any one she wanted to use!!!
Reply to this comment Report abuse 3 Azar Attura Wishing Bellini the best! 05/04/2016 03:46pm I hope s/he is never used as an attraction to show off.

Wishing Bellini the very best of loving forever homes.

And yes, which litterbox should Bellini use??!! (MOL) Reply to this comment Report abuse 16 Docrick 05/18/2016 09:14am She/he is more correctly a psuedohemaphrodite as the kitten does not have functional organs of both sexes. Often these are females externally but have retained the structures that would have been testicles as ovaries. All fetuses start of as female, and the testosterone produced (normally) but the fetus will cause the structures to develop to testes, etc. I have seen a few cases of this in cats and dogs both Reply to this comment Report abuse 8


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Rescue Dog Donates Blood To Help Injured Kittens http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/dog-donates-blood-help-injured-kittens-see-33962









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Rescue Dog Donates Blood To Help Injured Kittens


By Aly Semigran    April 13, 2016 at 11:07AM / (0) comments










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Whoever still believes the myth that cats and dogs can't live in harmony must not have heard about Jemmie, the caring canine, and the kitties she helped save. 
 
Jemmie is an 8-year-old Shih Tzu/Lhasa Apso mix who was adopted from the Sacramento SPCA. Now, this selfless pup is giving back to the very place that found her a forever home.
 
Jemmie's owner Sarah Varanini is the Foster Care Coordinator at the Sacramento SPCA and tells petMD that her personable and friendly dog has "donated blood to several kittens over the years." Recently Jemmie helped out two kitties who were dropped off at the facility in poor condition. 
 
The kittens were part of a litter that was found in a backyard. They were brought to the SPCA at only a month-old and were suffering from eye ulcers and infections. 
 
Enter Jemmie to the rescue. Vets drew about 10-20ccs of blood from Jemmie, and then, as Varanini explains, they spun the blood down in a centrifuge to create a serum. "We use the serum (or plasma) on top as eye drops for the kitten," she explains. 
 
"Because we are only using the serum, not a blood transfusion, we can use either dog or cat's blood. Regardless of blood type," Varanini says. 
 
Jemmie's blood donation and the serum helped both kitties, who are now thriving. While one of the kittens had to have a ruptured eye removed, the other eye is healing. Both kittens, who are now a little over 6-weeks-old, are currently in foster care and are getting stronger and healthier everyday. 
 
But the kittens aren't the only ones who are doing well: Varanini confirms that Jemmie is "very good about having her blood drawn" and that she gets plenty of treats and love when she's done with her service.
 
 
Image via Sacramento SPCA
 





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Two Orphaned Kittens Get a Second Chance At Life...And a Fun Playdate http://www.petmd.com/news/cat/two-orphaned-kittens-get-second-chance-lifeand-fun-playdate-33936









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Two Orphaned Kittens Get a Second Chance At Life...And a Fun Playdate


By Aly Semigran    April 08, 2016 at 10:51AM / (3) comments










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If any two cats deserved a playdate in a safe and happy environment, it was Boop and Bruno, who had a rough start at life. 
 
At just five days old, Bruno (the black cat) was seized by Washington D.C.'s animal control. He was found in a cruelty case and because of his terrible living conditions, was covered in bacterial cysts. One-week-old Boop (the grey cat) was discovered in the trash in Virginia, scared and crying out for help.
 
Luckily, both of these cats found their way to Hannah Shaw, also known as The Kitten Lady. Shaw's organization rescues and rehabilitates neonatal kittens, as well as educating the public on the need to care for these felines.
 
"Neonatal kittens do not fare well in a shelter setting, both because shelters typically don't have the resources to give them the round-the-clock specialized care they need, but also because a crowded shelter can be a dangerous place for a baby with a weakened immune system," Shaw tells petMD. "For that reason, it's often best for kittens to be raised in a foster home or nursery setting."
 
Before Boop and Bruno could be on their way to being having the playful kitten lives they deserved, Shaw had to nurse them to good healh. Bruno recieved antibiotic treatments and extractions for his cysts, which went away after a week. "After that, he just had a funny little haircut while his shaved areas grew back," Shaw shares. "Now that his hair has grown back in he is the picture of feline health—a strong, energetic little boy." 
 
"Boop struggled in her first weeks," Shaw says. "She had signs of Fading Kitten Syndrome like fever and dehydration. After being treated with subcutaneous fluids, plasma therapy, pancreatic support, diluted formula with pedialyte, and a lot of love and patience, Boop has made a full recovery from FKS."
 
Caring for kittens this young and with this much trauma can often prove to be a challenge. "Orphaned kittens need to be bottle fed and stimulated to go to the bathroom every 2-4 hours for the first weeks of life, including overnight—and they need to be carefully monitored for medical issues," says Shaw. "Because they have had to survive without their mother, they often have poor immune systems and are susceptible to illness." 
 
Thankfully, with the aid of The Kitten Lady, Boop and Bruno thrived and got the best gift of all: a best friend. After their respective quarantines and care, Boop and Bruno became inseparable. Their first playdate, was not only adorable (which, as you can see from these photos, was beyond cute), but a big moment in their young lives.
 

 
Shaw explains, "These two kittens had never seen another kitten—they both became orphaned when their eyes were still closed. The look on Bruno and Boop's faces when they saw each other for the first time was priceless. Bruno especially was very excited and wouldn't stop pouncing and jumping with glee over his new friend. There's something very special about seeing two orphans, who came into life with such a disadvantage, having the opportunity to experience a 'normal' childhood with good health and loving friends." 
 

 
Once Boop and Bruno meet the required weight and age, and have been spayed and neutered, they will be available for adoption. The Kitten Lady is hoping to find a new loving forever home that these two can live in together. (If you are interested in applying to adopt Boop and Bruno, you can do so here.) 
 

 
 
Not only is Boop and Bruno's story heartwarming, but they are spreading awareness about the importance of educating the masses about strays. Shaw alerts those who find kittens outside, "Don't assume they are orphaned. "
 
She adds, "So many of the babies that come to me are picked up from well-meaning individuals who simply didn't realize that the mom was around the corner...but orphaning kittens puts them at a much higher risk than letting them stay with their mother."
 
Shaw recommends waiting at least two hours to see if the mother returns, and if she does, leaving them with her until they can be weaned and taken into foster care and that the mother can be spayed. 
 
To learn more about The Kitten Lady's mission and to meet the other cats she has cared for, visit her website and her Instagram. 
 
Images via Andrew Marttila 





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DiAnPe KITTENS 05/03/2016 10:19am I wish the world could be filled with people like Hannah Shaw. The world needs more compassion. I hope these two beautiful little babies will be adopted together and I hope they go to a family that will give them years and years of love and happiness. It's what every pet deserves. Thank you, Hannah, for the wonderful work that you do. Reply to this comment Report abuse 29 KatWrangler A BEAUTIFUL STORY 05/03/2016 05:40pm Hannah Shaw is awesome. I agree this world needs more people like her. I also agree that Boop and Bruno are a bonded pair and need to go to a wonderful loving home together. I'll volunteer if no one else can do this Reply to this comment Report abuse 11 KatWrangler 05/03/2016 05:41pm con't ...I couldn't seperate two of my kittens, so they're still here - big and bad :) And still totally devoted to each other.
It does my heart good to know ther are people like Hannah out there. And she's so right about everything in this article.
Thank you, Hannah, for all you do Reply to this comment Report abuse 7


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Injured Puppy Undergoes Risky Procedure, Wakes Up Healed and Healthy http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/injured-puppy-undergoes-anesthesia-wakes-healed-and-healthy-33923









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Injured Puppy Undergoes Risky Procedure, Wakes Up Healed and Healthy


By Aly Semigran    April 07, 2016 at 09:24AM / (0) comments










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At just 6-weeks-old, a puppy named Ethan had an infected bite wound near his armpit that required surgery.
 
According a press release, Ethan was nipped by another dog in his litter and weighed less than a pound when he was brought in to the ASPCA Animal Hospital in New York City by his owner. Dr. Mary St. Martin evaluated the puppy's injury.
 
Because of his young age and small stature, St. Martin knew Ethan would need a very specific dosage of neonate anesthesia (specifically used for young animals) and a pain management plan for his procedure.
 
She explains to petMD that neonate anesthesia can provide a challenge for a number of reasons. In puppies, "the nerves to their respiratory and cardiovascular systems are not completely developed until they are a few weeks old" and, because of their physiology, these young animals "have larger metabolic oxygen requirements and are very susceptible to hypoxemia (low oxygen level in the blood)." 
 
In addition to the breathing issues that neonates face under anesthesia, St. Martin explains that it can take close to a month for their livers and kidneys to mature, which impacts how they "metabolize drugs adequately." They also have "lower blood protein levels than adults and this influences how drugs affect them." That's especially notable when you consider that, as St. Martin notes, they are "able to feel pain from birth."
 
But, thankfully, despite all the risks posed in putting Ethan under anesthesia at such a young age, the strong-willed puppy pulled through the surgery. Under the neonate anesthesia for just 20 minutes, the mighty pup's procedure went very well, which St. Martin credits to the efforts of the ASPCA team. "Ethan was discharged with antibiotics and pain medication," she tells petMD. " I saw him for a re-check exam a few weeks after his procedure and he looked great."
 
St. Martin tells us that Ethan was a "great patient" and as Ethan's owner put it to the ASPCA, "I knew he was tiny but I also knew he was strong."
 
Image via Anita Kelso Edson/ASPCA 





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FC Department of Animal Sciences Announces Successful Interspecies Breeding of Chinese Pug and Hulstlander Rabbit http://www.petmd.com/news/strange-but-true/nws_faber_college_announces_pug_rabbit_sucess_breeding-30034
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Reptiles are at Risk of Extinction, Study Finds http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/nws_rp_Reptiles_are_at_risk_study_finds-29835
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Bernese Mountain Dog Greta Begins Recovery From Stroke With Community Support http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/therapy-dog-stroke-recovery-33853









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Bernese Mountain Dog Greta Begins Recovery From Stroke With Community Support


By Aly Semigran    March 30, 2016 at 01:13PM / (0) comments










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Greta is a 4-year-old Bernese Mountain Dog who has devoted her young life to comforting humans in need. Now, Greta needs assistance from the people around her—and luckily her community is stepping up to help.
 
On March 21, Greta suffered an FCE stroke (also known as a fibrocartilaginous embolism), which causes paralysis in the limbs. Before her stroke, Greta—a member of Canine Corps at Boulder Community Health— visited ICU patients and staff to lift their spirits. Greta also provided therapy to those in her community who needed it—from patients suffering medical trauma to local students looking for a calming presence during exams.
 
The stroke hit her pet parent, Lorri Cotton, hard. A neighbor noticed that something was wrong and thought the dog had a broken leg. "She said that she heard a yelp and found her in the yard standing with an oddly hunched back on three of her legs,” says Cotton. “She was holding one of her front paws up and she would not come on command. She soon went down to the ground and could not get up. Her eyes were glassy."
 
Dr. Daniel Mones, VMD, cVMA of Alpine Hospital for Animals in Boulder, Colo., treated Greta when she was brought in. Though FCE strokes are fairly uncommon, Mones notes that it tends to effect younger dogs and larger breeds. This type of stroke occurs when, "material ends up dislodging from somewhere, and gets stuck in either an artery or a vein in the spinal cord.” This plugs up the vessel and blocks blood flow in the spine, explains Mones. In Greta's case, it impacted all four of her limbs. 
     
In Greta's case an x-ray, ultrasound, MRI and a spinal tap helped doctors determine that aggressive physical therapy was her best option. Following her stroke, Greta started on acupuncture, massages, and hyperbaric and laser treatments. 
 
"Recovery will be a long road, as she has lost the ability to stand and walk," Cotton acknowledges. "She is unable to lift her head on her own at this point."
 
Cotton not only carries her dog, but helps her eat and drink (for which she uses a large plastic syringe). She is doing everything she can to assure that Greta's mood and mobility are on the right track. 
 
While this type of stroke cannot be prevented from happening, Mones urges all pet parents to be aware of the condition and to take immediate action if they suspect something is wrong.
 
"It is such a traumatic thing to watch your dog go through," Cotton says, "But with patience, love and proper rehabilitation dogs can bounce back and live normal lives.”
 
Mones explains that treatment, when done quickly and with the proper diagnosis, will get dogs like Greta back to living a happy and healthy life. "We’re being aggressive with trying to get back her mobility, because the earlier we do that, the better chance of success we have," he says.
 
When she does recover, Greta has many who will be there to welcome her with open arms. "She has a large group of supporters anxiously awaiting her return," says Pat Dimond of the Boulder Community Health Center. Dimond says that a therapy dog like Greta is a "vital" part of their efforts. 
 
The medical bills for Greta’s rehabilitation are high—over $10,000— but Cotton has received support from friends, family, and her community. Contributors have already raised over $8,000 to help support Greta’s care on her GoFundMe page.
 
"I love this dog with all of my heart," Cotton says. "I eagerly anticipate the day when she walks, runs, climbs mountains and travels through the front door of Boulder Community Hospital again. I believe in her and I believe it will happen."
 
 
Image via Lori Cotton 





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http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/therapy-dog-stroke-recovery-33853#comments dog dogs Lifestyle & Entertainment Wed, 30 Mar 2016 17:13:10 +0000 33853 at http://www.petmd.com
Smallbatch Pets Recalls Frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders Due to Possible Salmonella and Listeria Risk http://www.petmd.com/news/alerts-recalls/smallbatch-pets-recalls-frozen-dog-duckbatch-sliders-due-possible-salmonella-and









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Smallbatch Pets Recalls Frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders Due to Possible Salmonella and Listeria Risk


By Elizabeth Henry    March 29, 2016 at 12:14PM / (1) comments










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Smallbatch Pets Inc. is voluntarily recalling one lot of Frozen Dog Duckbatch Sliders due to potential  Salmonella and Listeria Monocytogenes contamination.
 
According to a company release, the recall was initiated after testing by the Food and Drug Administration of a 3lb bag of dog duckbatch sliders revealed the presence of Salmonella and Listeria. The potentially affected lots of dog duckbatch sliders were distributed to retail pet food stores in CA, CO, OR, WA through pet food retailers/distributors. Eighty cases of this product were sold between 2/23/16 – 3/10/16.
 
Consumers who have purchased the above lots of dog duck sliders are urged to stop feeding them and return product to place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them immediately.
 
The affected products are sold frozen in 3lbs. bags. The products affected by this recall are identified with the following manufacturing codes:
 




LOT #
Best By Date
UPC




CO27
01/27/17
713757339001




 
Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Additionally, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
 
If you or your pet had contact with the recalled product, you are advised to watch for symptoms that may develop. Common symptoms associated with Listeria infection include high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. If you, your pet or a family member is experiencing these symptoms, you are urged to contact a medical professional.
 
For more information, the release asked customers call 888-507-2712, Monday - Friday, 9:00AM - 4:00PM PST or email info@smallbatchpets.com.





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http://www.petmd.com/news/alerts-recalls/smallbatch-pets-recalls-frozen-dog-duckbatch-sliders-due-possible-salmonella-and#comments Alerts & Recalls recall Tue, 29 Mar 2016 16:14:16 +0000 33839 at http://www.petmd.com
Shock the Pit Bull Learns to Walk Again Following Harrowing Accident http://www.petmd.com/news/care-safety/shock-pit-bull-learns-walk-again-following-harrowing-accident-33824









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Shock the Pit Bull Learns to Walk Again Following Harrowing Accident


By PetMD Editorial    March 28, 2016 at 12:20PM / (0) comments










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By Caitlin Ultimo
 
A simple Sunday evening spent grilling outside quickly turned into a pet parent’s worst nightmare for the McCulloughs of Oklahoma City this past October.
 
Dr. McCullough and his wife Laura walked out to the startling sight of their 10-year-old pit bull, Shock, lying motionless at the bottom of their pool. Having only left him alone for a matter of minutes, they can only speculate how he ended up there.
 
“We have an automatic [pool] vacuum and he tries to bite the water that squirts out,” says Dr. McCullough. “All we can figure is that he had jumped when it squirted and had slipped and fell into the shallow end, possibly hurting his neck.”
 
McCullough jumped into the pool immediately to retrieve his family’s beloved dog. Shock wasn’t breathing and his temperature had dropped. McCullough’s next move was an essential first part of Shock’s survival.
 
“I’m an orthodontist, so we have to have CPR refreshers every year,” says McCullough. “I knew how to do it on a person, but never thought about doing it on a dog.” But without thinking further, McCullough began CPR on Shock’s lifeless body.
 
“I first pumped his chest to get any water out; after a few compressions some water came out of his mouth. I then held his mouth closed and blew into his snout.”
 
After successfully reviving his dog, he rushed Shock to Oklahoma City’s Blue Pearl Specialty + Emergency Pet Hospital.
 
This would be Shock’s second visit to Blue Pearl. A few years after the McCulloughs’ son rescued Shock from a gym’s parking lot, Shock hurt his back and couldn’t walk on his back legs. “We went to our vet and they recommended Blue Pearl,” said Dr. McCullough. 
 
After his first successful recovery, the McCulloughs returned to Blue Pearl for this emergency situation years later.
 
Shock was first admitted to the emergency department, where he was still having difficulty breathing, seemed unresponsive, and couldn’t walk. After he was put on oxygen support, Shock was stabilized. Dr. Benjamin Spall, DVM, MS, from the surgery department went in to further assess him the next day.
 
It was still difficult to determine the possible cause of the fall and its effects, said Dr. Spall. “We did our neurological assessment and a physical exam,” explains Spall. “We tried to get him up, checked his reflexes, tried to see if his paws could move, and were able to localize the issue to his neck.”
 
After identifying that it was too painful for Shock to move his neck, his doctors ordered an MRI.
 
“We knew we had to do the MRI," said Spall, and because dogs are administered anesthesia before they undergo certain tests like MRIs, "we waited another day to be sure his breathing had stabilized before administering the anesthesia.”
 
The MRI showed lesions on the discs of Shock's spinal cord that most likely occurred as a result from his fall into the pool.
 
The next day Shock underwent a surgery that lasted over two hours to remove the disc material that had ruptured in his spinal cord. Spall and McCullough were unsure if Shock would make a full recovery. “The recovery process can be very touch and go, and possibly more difficult when dealing with a larger dog,” shares Spall.
 
Shock remained in the hospital for about a week and a half after his surgery so that doctors could monitor his respiratory rate, prevent pneumonia after surgery, and begin physical rehabilitation, including balancing Shock on an exercise ball, bicycling his legs, and helping him stand with a harness in hopes of stimulating his muscle memory.
 
“We visited him every night. The doctors probably wanted to have him stay longer, but we wanted him home,” says McCullough.
 
After about a week of keeping up with physical therapy exercises at home and supporting him with a harness to lift his back legs while he walked, Shock was back on his own four paws—much quicker than anyone had anticipated.
 
“One day I decided to see if he could support himself, and he was able to stand. Then a few days later, I told my mom to call him and he took off on his own right towards her,” says McCullough.
 
Needless to say, Shock had incredible support throughout the unfortunate ordeal, and still does today.
 
To aid in a pet’s successful recovery, "it takes the right owner, time, practice, and communication between a pet’s doctors and owners,” says Spall. It was not an easy road, but Shock and his family never gave up.
 
“I wasn’t always optimistic, but I was going to try as long as he was,” says McCullough.
 
Today, Shock is getting back to his old self but is staying away from the pool—and the McCullough’s are only running their pool vacuum at night. 
 





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