http://www.petmd.com/news/rss en Radagast Pet Food, Inc. Recalls Four Lots Of Frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet http://www.petmd.com/news/alerts-recalls/radagast-pet-food-inc-recalls-four-lots-frozen-rad-cat-raw-diet-34363









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Radagast Pet Food, Inc. Recalls Four Lots Of Frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet


By Wendy Toth    June 27, 2016 at 03:48PM / (0) comments










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Radagast Pet Food, Inc., based in Portland, Oregon, is voluntarily recalling four lots of frozen Rad Cat Raw Diet products, sold in 8oz., 16oz., and 24oz. tubs, and free 1oz sample cups, due to the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella and/or Listeria monocytogenes.
 
According to a company release, the recall was initiated after an FDA third party contracted lab found two lots of Grass-Fed Beef tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, one lot of Free-range Chicken tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes, and one lot of Free-range Turkey tested positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.
 
As a precautionary measure, the company is voluntarily recalling three products produced in these four lots.
 
All affected lot codes 62384, 62361, 62416, and 62372 and Best By dates are located on the lid of all products packaged in tubs, and on the bottom of the sample cups.
 
The following recalled products were distributed in western Canada and all U.S. States except in Hawaii and Mississippi.
 

 
Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.
 
Common symptoms associated with Listeria infection include high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Listeria monocytogenes can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Additionally, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
 
Pets with Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets may have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.
 
If you or your pet had contact with the recalled product, you are advised to watch for symptoms that may develop. If you, your pet, or a family member is experiencing these symptoms, you are urged to contact a medical professional.
 
Please do not return any of these recalled products to the retailer and dispose in a secure garbage receptacle.
 
For refund claims, fill out all sections of the consumer claims form provided by the manufacturer, found on www.RadFood.com and return this form only to the retailer where you purchased the product for a refund. Consumers may call Radagast Pet Food, Inc. at 503-736-4649 for assistance.

Source: FDA



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Why Your Vet Visit Costs So Much http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/why-your-vet-visit-costs-so-much-34299









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Why Your Vet Visit Costs So Much


By Jennifer Coates    June 27, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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It’s a never-ending refrain, “Why does veterinary care cost so much?”
 
I get it. I’m not just a veterinarian but also an animal owner. Sure, I can take care of some of my own pets’ needs, but not all of them. Did I flinch at the $2,000 bill for treating my cat’s hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine? You bet I did, but I didn’t complain because I recognize what a bargain veterinary care usually is.
 
The best way to avoid sticker shock is being prepared, so let’s take a look at what’s involved in a veterinary visit and the typical costs that you should expect.
 
The first thing to understand is that geography plays a big role. Imagine the cost of running a veterinary practice in New York City versus West Podunk. Rent, salaries, property taxes, property insurance, etc. would all be much higher in NYC, and those costs simply have to be passed on to clients if a veterinary practice is to remain a going concern. The best we can do here is look at averages and acknowledge that a lot of variability exists.
 
A veterinary visit should always start with a complete health history, physical exam, and the acquisition of some basic data, like body weight, body temperature, pulse rate, and respiratory rate. The cost of all of this should be included in the office visit/physical exam charges. This is the absolute minimum you need to be willing to pay to see a veterinarian.
 
At this point, the doctor can provide you with an estimate for recommended diagnostic testing and/or treatment. This is when you can start talking about options. Very often, there are several ways to approach veterinary care. When appropriate, the doctor should be able to give you an idea of the risks, benefits, and costs associated with gold standard, moderate, and minimalist care.
 
The American Kennel Club reports these estimates for routine veterinary care during a puppy’s first year of life.
 
Annual Physical Exam    $58
Vaccinations    $268
Heartworm Test and Prevention    $127
Flea and Tick Prevention    $190
Fecal Exam    $60
Dental Cleaning    $125
Spay or Neuter    $175
 
Some of these expenses will recur approximately annually (e.g., physical exam, parasite testing/prevention, possibly a dental cleaning), others less frequently (some vaccinations). The costs associated with routine veterinary care for a cat would be similar if the cat goes outside and perhaps slightly lower for an indoor-only individual.
 
Remember, talk to your veterinarian if finances are tight. Depending on your pet’s circumstances, it might be possible to avoid certain expenses, at least for a while. For example, I live in a part of the country where heartworm disease is infrequently diagnosed. Although it is not ideal, if an owner had kept their dog on heartworm prevention per my recommendations over the past year and needed to cut somewhere, I’d be willing to postpone a heartworm test.
 
To ensure that you can always provide your pets with the veterinary care they need, either routinely set aside money in a special pet care savings account or purchase a reputable pet health insurance policy. 





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Company Crafts Cat Wine, But Is It Safe? http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/wine-cats-cheers-34337









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Company Crafts Cat Wine, But Is It Safe?


By Aly Semigran    June 21, 2016 at 12:00PM / (0) comments










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Cabernet, merlot, and chianti can now be cat-bernet, meow-lot, and kitty-anti. 
 
A Denver-based company called Apollo Peak has created a wine for cats to drink, made with fresh beet juice, organic catnip, and natural preservatives. According to the Apollo Peak website, the non-alcoholic beverage will have a "mellowed out" effect on a kitty because of the catnip. 
 
While the company boasts their product as safe and tasty for both pets and humans alike, some vets still have their concerns about the cat-nip wine. Dr. Nancy J. Dunkle, DVM, of Exclusively Cats Veterinary Hospital, says that the ingredients could still be problematic for your pet. 
 
Dunkle explains that while beet pulp is used in some dry foods as a natural probiotic ("It ferments into 'good bacteria' in the gut"), beet juice could have sugars, which is never reccomended for cats. Even fresh beet juice may contain high sugar content, which could be problematic to diabetic cats or a cat with gastrointestinal problems, says Dunkle. She also has concerns about the natural ingredients, which are not listed on the Apollo Peak website. "Some [natural ingredients] are not good for cats, while others are okay," she says.
 
Dr. Elizabeth Arguelles, DVM, of Just Cats Clinic, echoes the issue that the wine is not a healthy treat for cats. "While the listed ingredients aren't toxic for cats, they aren't beneficial for them either." Arguelles says that cats don't need any of the ingredients from the wine in their diets.
 
She also voices her concerns that the product hasn't been reviewed by the FDA or the AAFCO, "meaning its under no scrutiny or quality control testing." Arguelles reminds pet parents that just because something is marketed as "natural" doesn't necessarily mean that it is safe or has any health benefits. 
 
Although the company claims that the wine is not dangerous for felines, it is best to consult a veterinarian before introducing anything new into your cat's diet. Or, Dunkle says, you can offer up another safe catnip beverage that you can make at home. She suggests maybe trying a catnip tea for your pet. The recipe simply calls for organic catnip which is distilled in water—with no other ingredients to ensure it is safe and healthy.
 
Arguelles also suggests a tasty and safe alternative for kitty: freezing chicken broth in an ice cube tray, and then putting the cube in their water dish.  
 
The only positive thing that really comes from this is that it serves as a reminder that beverages that do contain alcohol (unlike this cat wine) should never be given to a pet, as it is "incredibly dangerous." Risks include vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, depression, difficulty breathing, seizures, coma, and in some cases, death. 
 
So when it comes to cat wine, as Arguelles aptly puts it, "The novelty is fun and cute, [but] it's not really the best choice for your furry feline." 
 
Image via Shutterstock 





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http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/wine-cats-cheers-34337#comments Lifestyle & Entertainment Tue, 21 Jun 2016 16:00:20 +0000 34337 at http://www.petmd.com
Why Dogs Lick and When to Worry http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/why-dogs-lick-and-when-worry-34301









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Why Dogs Lick and When to Worry


By Katie Grzyb    June 20, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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Dogs lick themselves, that’s a fact of life, but when does it get to be an issue? You may catch your pooch bathing daily to keep clean. This is an innate behavior in the animal kingdom. But there are times when licking can become excessive and can be a clinical sign of an underlying illness.
 
Allergies are the number one cause of excessive licking in dogs. Owners may note that their dog licks in between the toes (sometimes leading to staining of the fur due to enzymes in the saliva), they may lick and chew at their hind end and their inner thighs.
 
Environmental allergies are caused by dusts, danders, pollens, and other airborne particles which lead to build-up on the skin and fur of the dog and in turn cause itching. Allergies to flea bites and certain proteins in pet food can cause similar signs.
 
Cleaning your dog’s paws with doggie wipes or a warm washcloth after walks outside can help to decrease environmental allergens. Owners should seek veterinary attention for their dogs if the skin is changing color, if there are wounds, pimples, or crusts noted on the skin, if there is excessive scratching associated with the licking, and/or if fleas are seen.
 
Licking can also be a sign of nausea in some dogs. If your dog is licking abnormal places, such as the floors or the walls, or if your dog is licking his/her lips frequently, these can be a signs of gastrointestinal upset. Some dogs will also smack their lips or drool excessively when they feel nauseous.
 
If your dog is showing these signs and they last more than 24 hours, or if they are at all associated with vomiting, diarrhea, or lack of appetite, it is important to contact your veterinarian.
 
Addressing quality of life is the first step. There are shampoos that can help calm the itching as well as veterinary prescribed anti-histamines to keep your dog comfortable.
 
Your vet may also recommend some diagnostic tests, such as a fecal panel, blood testing, and/or x-rays, to rule out causes of belly upset. Your veterinarian can often prescribe or administer medications to help control and sometimes eliminate the nausea for your pet.
 
Dogs can also have behavioral causes of excessive licking, such as anxiety or a type of obsessive disorder where they over-groom themselves. Some studies have shown that the act of licking increases endorphins in the brain which calms the dog while it is licking. Loud noises, separation anxiety and/or change in environment can lead to this behavior.
 
It is important to intervene to lessen or stop this behavior before the dog licks off all of its fur (usually confined to one site on the body, such as a leg or the abdomen), which can lead to skin infection (hot spots) and acral lick granulomas (which are masses that occur secondary to chronic abrasion with the tongue and inflammation to the area). These infections and granulomas can be painful to the dog.
 
If there is trauma to the skin, your veterinarian will treat the skin infections and/or granulomas caused by the excessive licking and then determine if the licking is a medical disorder or something that can be alleviated with behavior training.
 
Diversion techniques can be instituted if your pet is over grooming. This entails close monitoring and side-tracking your dog when he starts to obsessively groom. Give him/her a favorite toy or treat to focus on, go for a walk, or even spend some quality time brushing your dog. This can help get his/her mind off of the compulsions.
 
If your veterinarian determines after examination (and possible diagnostic testing) that your dog is licking due to compulsive behavior or anxiety, there are some natural calming products that can be instituted. These include calming drops for the water, calming treats, pheromone collars, and thunder shirts. Very dilute apple cider vinegar can also be sprayed on the skin to deter licking but should be discussed with a veterinarian first to be sure it will not irritate the skin further. These natural products tend to have little to no side effects and are safest when starting a treatment plan.
 
Keeping a low stress environment for anxious dogs can be very helpful also; quiet, low lighting, and slow movements. Still, sometimes natural products are not enough to calm your dog and stop excessive licking. This is when a thorough discussion should be had with your veterinarian about behavior modification drugs such as Fluoxetine and Clomipramine. However, these medications can have side effects and are usually only given for chronic conditions. It is important to discuss all of the pros and cons with your veterinarian prior to starting your dog on these medications.
 
Quality of life is the most important thing when it comes to our pets. Excessive licking can cause that quality to decrease over time. If you think your dog is excessively licking, it is pertinent to discuss these signs with your veterinarian. Together you can determine if the signs are something to be concerned about, or if your pet is simply taking his/her daily bath. 
 





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Dog Ingests Gorilla Glue and Undergoes Emergency Surgery http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/dog-ingests-gorilla-glue-undergoes-surgery-which-perfect-mold-was-extracted-vet-34325









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Dog Ingests Gorilla Glue and Undergoes Emergency Surgery


By Aly Semigran    June 16, 2016 at 01:46PM / (0) comments










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Let this serve as a warning to any pet parent (or parent in general, really) that has Gorilla Glue in their households: keep it far away from anyone or anything that could get to it. 
 
Case in point: a 6-month-old puppy named Lake ingested the extra-strength glue and started vomiting. Lake's owner called her veterinarian, Dr. Leonardo Baez, DVM, of Midtown Vets in Oklahoma City, Okla., who told them emergency surgery would have to be performed. 
 
"Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane," Baez explains, "so as soon as it makes contact with anything that is liquid, it begins expanding." In the case of Lake, the glue was expanding inside of her stomach at a rapid volume. 
 
The vets performed the surgery (which took roughly 45 minutes) and removed the glue, which had formed into a perfect mold of Lake's stomach. Lake, who was given antibiotics and IV fluids, is now recovering well after the health scare. Baez shares that the dog is already up and running and eating again. 
 

 
While Lake was lucky, Baez notes that it could have been worse if the glue had gotten stuck in the dog's esophagus, which could have been fatal. The continually-expanding glue could tear vital tissues if not removed in time. That's why if a dog does ingest Gorilla Glue, it's vital that a pet parent takes them in for emergency care. As Baez simply puts it, "Gorilla Glue equals surgery." 
 
Baez says that dogs eating Gorilla Glue is, unfortunately, not an uncommon occurence and notes that it has a sweet taste that seems to appeal to curious pups. He hopes that the Gorilla Glue company will put a stronger word of warning about the possible risks that the product provides for pets and children alike. 
 
Images via Dr. Leonardo Biaz and Midtown Vets 
 





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Behind the Amazing Photo of the Injured Owl Hugging Her Rescuer http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/amazing-photo-injured-owl-hugs-her-rescuer-34323









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Behind the Amazing Photo of the Injured Owl Hugging Her Rescuer


By Aly Semigran    June 15, 2016 at 08:34AM / (0) comments










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Hoo wants a hug? For GiGi the owl, that answer was simple: she wanted to show her gratitude to one of the workers at Wild at Heart Rescue, Inc. in Vancleave, Miss. 
 
Last month, the great horned owl was brought into Wild at Heart after suffering head trauma. After being treated successfully by the staff, a one-of-a-kind moment was caught on camera by the organization's founder and president Missy Dubuisson. GiGi showed her appreciation to Wild at Heart's co-president Doug Pojeky by embracing him with an owl's version of a hug. 
 
"Was it truly an owl hug? We would like to think so," Dubuisson tells petMD. "All I did was capture a moment in time. And what a beautiful moment it was." In her line of work Dubuisson says she'd never seen anything quite like this before. 
 
GiGi the owl has since recovered from her injuries and, as Dubuisson explains, she "was released back to the exact GPS location in which she was rescued" and was even reunited with her mate. 
 
While GiGi was very thankful for the human help, Dubuisson urges anyone who finds sick or injured wildlife to stay clear and call a professional. "Call a licensed wildlife rehabilitation and await further instructions."
 
The photo, which has since gone viral, has humbled the staff of Wild at Heart. "With all the tragedies going on in the world, an owl hug made everybody feel better for a minute," says Dubuisson.
 
Image via Wild at Heart, Inc. Facebook 
 





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Extremely Rare Snake Species is Discovered in the Bahamas http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/rare-snake-species-discovered-bahamas-34306









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Extremely Rare Snake Species is Discovered in the Bahamas


By Aly Semigran    June 14, 2016 at 10:47AM / (0) comments










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For most of us the idea of a perfect trip to the Bahamas means sipping drinks and sitting by a pool, but for biologist R. Graham Reynolds, Ph.D. and his team of fellow researchers, it's discovering a rare breed of boa. 
 
While exploring a remote island in the southern Bahamas, Reynolds noticed a snake crawling on a silver palm tree at dusk. Its unique coloring and head shape was one that Reynolds, an assistant professor of vertebrate biology at the University of North Carolina Asheville, and his team had never seen before. DNA analysis would confirm that this was, in fact, a new snake species. 
 
"We named the species the Silver Boa (Chilabothrus argentum) because of its silvery color and because the first one was in a silver palm tree," Reynolds tells petMD.    
 
Reynolds and his team have made three expeditions to this particular island and have concluded that the animals occur in a very small area. "Our early results from mark/recapture surveys suggest that there are fewer than 1,000 animals left, making this a critically endangered species." 
 
Not only is it a critically endangered species, but it faces threats on the island, including by feral cats. As Reynolds explains, "Feral cats are devastating to Caribbean boa populations; the cats eat the boas and can easily cause a population crash." 
 
Non-venomous snakes like the Silver Boa are vital to our ecosystem, as they are terrestrial predators. "As we know from countless other studies, the loss of top predators can cause top-down ecological collapse." 
 
The discovery of the Silver Boa is an important one. "[It] shows us how important protected areas are to biodiversity conservation," says Reynolds. "The species was found on an island that is a National Park. If the island had not been protected as a park, these snakes would almost certainly have gone extinct before we knew they existed." 
 
Image via R. Graham Reynolds, Ph.D. 
 





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Puppy Rescued By Buddhist Monks Is Up and Moving Thanks to Their Care and a Donated Wheelchair http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/puppy-rescued-monks-and-moving-thanks-donated-wheelchair-34302









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Puppy Rescued By Buddhist Monks Is Up and Moving Thanks to Their Care and a Donated Wheelchair


By Aly Semigran    June 13, 2016 at 01:53PM / (0) comments










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During a time when the world seems like a scary place, the story of Tashi the dog serves as a reminder that there is love, compassion, and generosity of spirit all over the world. 
 
Back an April a pup named Tashi was rescued by exiled Tibetan monks at the Sera monastery in Bylakuppe, India. The poor, months-old dog had become paralyzed after stray dogs attacked her. The monks took the injured animal in and cared for her. 
 
One of the Buddhist nuns at the monastery reached out to Handicapped Pets, an organization that provides products and services to help elderly, injured, or disabled pets. When Handicapped Pets heard the amazing story of Tashi they donated a Walkin' Wheels dog wheelchair so that the pup could walk around comfortably in her new home. (Since Tashi no longer has use of her hind legs, they now rest in the stirrups of the wheelchair.) 
 
Lisa Murray of Handicapped Pets tells petMD that their friends at the monastery informed them that Tashi "is really enjoying her new way of walking." 
 
Murray says that the story of Tashi and the monks who rescued her resonated with them and served as a reminder of the love that all creatures deserve. 
 
"We were inspired by Tashi’s story because this world has so much very painful violence and unnecessary suffering in it, and the exiled Tibetan monks devote their lives to promoting a spirit of peace and compassion," she says. "Some people might have ignored the tiny, helpless little life that had become so physically damaged, but the monks saved her. She seemed to me to be a powerful representation of what is possible. How we treat animals paves the way for how we treat each other."
 
The feeling of gratitude and love was reciprocated, as the monks sent a thank you letter and a ribbon blessed by the Dalai Lama to the people at Handicapped Pets. 
 
"It makes us feel great," Murray says, adding, "Sometimes the ripples of those efforts can have more of an impact than is immediately apparent."
 
You can read more of Tashi's story here: Compassion, Dalai Lama Style, and First Steps of Freedom.
 
Image via Handicapped Pets
 





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Wildfire Safety and Preparedness for Your Pet http://www.petmd.com/news/care-safety/wildfire-safety-and-preparedness-your-pet-34300









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Wildfire Safety and Preparedness for Your Pet


By Dr. Patrick Mahaney    June 13, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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Living in southern California, there are many natural disasters we Golden State dwellers face on a seemingly year-round basis, including wildfires, mudslides, and earthquakes. Events where nature one-ups man can occur randomly or may have a seasonal pattern to their destructive tendencies.
 
Fortunately, the seasonal nature of some disasters presents pet owners with the opportunity to prepare ahead so that our canine and feline friends face little or no hardships or health problems.
 
In California, the high heat and dry climate associated with summertime ramps up the concern for wildfires that can strike at any moment.
 
Wildfires, whether started by man-made causes (cigarette butts, campfires, etc.) or natural events (lightning, high-temperature combustion of environmental materials, etc.), commonly cause cataclysmic damage to affected communities.
 
Health Dangers Associated with Wildfires
 
The charred air plaguing wildfire-affected areas harbors irritants that can negatively impact animal and human health. Airborne particulate material irritates pets’ eyes, respiratory tracts, skin, and other body systems. Additionally, inhalation of toxic chemicals from burning fuels, metal, plastics, and even plant material (alkaloids) can cause mild to severe toxic effects to internal organs.
 
The clinical signs your pet may show post-exposure to irritants released by wildfires can vary from mild to severe, pending the degree of exposure, including:

Bletharospasm - squinting of the eyelids
Scleral injection and conjunctivitis - redness to the whites of the eyes (sclera) or tissue lining the eyelids (conjunctiva)
Pawing at the eyes or rubbing the eyes/face on environmental surfaces
Eye discharge
Coughing, wheezing, and other breathing difficulties
Sneezing and nasal discharge
Licking, chewing, or scratching at affected skin
Lethargy
Other

 
Direct exposure to heat will burn both external and internal body parts, including the skin, coat, eyes, mouth, and respiratory tract. Damaged trachea (windpipe) and lungs can’t properly function to permit air flow and oxygen delivery and will lead to hypoxia (oxygen deprivation). Deficient blood oxygen levels causes lethargy, increased respiratory rate and effort, weakness, ataxia (stumbling), syncope (fainting), or even death.
 
To help, owners must prioritize pet welfare during wildfires and other natural disasters. I’ve complied my top safety tips.
 
1. Be aware of the wildfire risks in your area.
Greater Los Angeles is frequently affected by wildfires, so the Los Angeles Times features a continuously updated Fire Map to keep residents informed of potential dangers. Check online to see what resources are available in your area.
 
We can help protect our human and animal family members by taking steps to reduce the likelihood our homes and yards will be affected by wildfire, including removing flammable shrubbery, cleaning gutters, and ensuring that no tree limbs hover over our roofs. See the full set of tips via the Los Angeles Fire Department’s helpful Ready, Set, Go page.
 
2. Know your pet’s location.
The urgency of natural disasters can motivate cats and small dogs to hide under beds, in closets, or to find other hidden spots to escape potential harm. The presence of medium and large-sized canines are generally more-obviously known, but they too may flee from their usual spots in the house, unbeknownst to their owners.
 
Always be aware of your pets’ location in your house, yard, or public place, and be familiar with their day-to-day habits, including preferred places for hiding and napping. Knowing your pets’ habits can facilitate their discovery should a wildfire prompt a sudden departure.
 
3. Properly identify your pet.
Pets that escape from our homes during a disaster like a wildfire are more likely to safely return if they are wearing up-to-date identification. Dogs and cats should wear a cervical (neck) collar or harness embroidered with their information or have an attached tag featuring their name and your phone number or other pertinent information.
 
Tags and collars can fall off or be removed and therefore won’t always guarantee you’ll be reunited with your pet. Having your veterinarian implant a microchip and keeping your personal information up-to-date with the microchip’s manufacturer increases the likelihood your pet will come home in a safe and timely fashion.
 
A 2009 AVMA study evaluating “more than 7,700 stray animals at animal shelters showed that dogs without microchips were returned to their owners 21.9% of the time, whereas microchipped dogs were returned to their owners 52.2% of the time. Cats without microchips were reunited with their owners only 1.8% of the time, whereas microchipped cats went back home 38.5% of the time.”
 
Since microchip identification requires a scanner, and because collars, harnesses, and tags may go missing, using multiple means of pet identification is my recommendation.
 
4. Provide pet-safe transportation.
If wildfires force you to flee, use a pet carrier to provide safe transport. Cats and small dogs should travel in a rigid or soft carrier. Vital information about your pet, including its name, species (dog, cat, etc.), color, breed or mix of breeds, weight, vaccination history, and your contact information should be readily seen on the outside of the carrier.
 
Medium and large-breed dogs aren’t easily transported in a carrier, so use a cervical (neck) collar or chest harness and leash to maintain control of their movements and to facilitate a safe escape.
 
5. Keep a sufficient supply of food, medications, and supplies.
Your pet’s health maintenance plan can be interrupted by wildfires and other disasters, so keep an ample stock of food, medications, and other supplies in readily accessible and transportable containers. Some pets require special diets and consistent dosing with medications and supplements to manage chronic conditions, and ailments can emerge or worsen if proper preparations aren’t taken.
 
Cardiff is in remission for cancer and has a history of Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA) and requires consistent medications, supplements, and herbs, so I keep them organized for use at home and while traveling in a “Monday through Sunday AM/PM” pill dispenser. I suggest having at least seven days of your pet’s food and 30 days of medication and supplements prepared should disaster strike.
 
One of the many reasons I recommend my patients eat Honest Kitchen foods and work with the company as a veterinary consultant is that Honest Kitchen diets are whole-food, human-grade, dehydrated, easy to transport, and most only require hydration before serving. This makes Honest Kitchen’s canine and feline meals ideal options for your pet to eat anytime, and especially during a disaster.
 
6. Immediately seek veterinary care.
Wildfires can expose your pet to smoke, fire, or other noxious substances, causing life-threatening damage to vital organs (brain, heart, lungs, etc.). Additionally, tissue damage from trauma or exposure to heat, smoke, or chemicals may not be apparent to pet owners but will be more obvious to the trained eye of veterinarians.
 
If you have concerns that your pet has incurred wildfire-associated trauma or toxicity, urgent care should be sought at an emergency veterinary practice. Besides a physical examination, radiographs (x-rays), blood and urine testing, and other diagnostics are commonly needed to establish a diagnosis and determine the best treatment plan.
 
*
 
For the sake of the well-being of your animal and human family, I hope you and your pets never face the life-changing chaos that occurs during wildfires.
 
All pet owners should have a disaster-preparedness strategy, including the above recommendations, if an event like a wildfire occurs.
 





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Paralyzed Kitten is Off and Running Thanks to Tiny Wheelchair http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/paralyzed-kitten-and-running-thanks-tiny-wheelchair-34292
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Recent Study Finds More Than Half of the Pet Cats and Dogs in the U.S. Are Overweight http://www.petmd.com/news/cats/recent-study-finds-more-half-pet-cats-and-dogs-us-are-overweight-34291









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Recent Study Finds More Than Half of the Pet Cats and Dogs in the U.S. Are Overweight


By Aly Semigran    June 08, 2016 at 09:33AM / (0) comments










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Pet obesity is always a weighty subject (so to speak) and a recent study from the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) just tipped the scales in a shocking new direction for the epidemic. 
 
According to the American Veterinary Medical Foundation, the findings from APOP discovered that "approximately 58 percent of cats and 54 percent of dogs were overweight or obese in 2015."
 
APOP defines obesity for pets as being 30 percent above the ideal weight. Of the 136 veterinary clinics who participated in the study, they analyzed "the body condition scores of every dog and cat patient seen for a regular wellness examination on a given day last October." The scores to denote body condition were based on a five-point scale and actual weight was used in determining whether pets were underweight, at an ideal weight, overweight, or obese. 
 
So what can pet parents do to ensure their cats or dogs don't fall under the umbrella of obese or overweight? Or, if their pet is already considered obese or overweight, what can they do to get them back to an ideal weight? 
 
Dr. Chris Miller, DVM of Atlas Vet in Washington, D.C., tells petMD, "The most important first step in preventing obesity in pets is recognizing that there is a problem." While most vets will use the "body condition score" to assess if a pet is the right size, Miller says that pet parents can and should keep an eye on an animal's figure, too. 
 
For instance, for dog owners, "There should be a noticeable visual change, or waist seen where the chest meets the abdomen," Miller says. "If you have to jab your fingers into your dog’s side to feel the ribs, or if your dog has the silhouette of a sausage looking down on top of them, your dog is likely overweight. Once you know your dog is too heavy, owners can take very simple steps to begin working on losing the undesired weight." 
 
Miller says that both a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are the leading causes of obesity, but that can be remedied by getting pets moving physically through playing and regular exercise, as well as monitoring their food intake. He also says to stick to regular feeding times and portion control rather than leaving food out all day for pets to eat as they please. 
 
"Can you imagine trying to lose weight when every time you walked past your dining room there was a buffet of food set up?" Miller says. "Having food out all the time encourages your pets to overeat."
 
But if you believe your pet is eating a healthy portion and exercising regularly, Miller explains that the extra weight could signal a medical condition. "Your veterinarian may need to check for certain endocrine disease that can predispose them to weight gain," he says.
 
No matter what is causing your pet's obesity, it is one that must be taken seriously by pet parents for the health and safety of their cats or dogs. 
 
"Dogs and cats that are overweight can suffer from a variety of ailments that are directly linked to obesity," Miller notes. "The increased fat can decrease range of motion, puts stress on joints, ligaments, bones, and muscles, and can make arthritis symptoms worse. This discourages the pet from moving, which can exacerbate the weight gain. Other issues like heart disease, weakened immune system, and skin disease can all be more prevalent or made worse by an overweight pet." 
 
Since obesity is a preventable issue, that staggering number found in the APOP study can fall if people take the proper steps to ensuring their pets' health. Pet parents simply have to promote an active and balanced lifestyle, and, of course, take their cat or dog to the vet to keep up on their vitals.
 
"Taking your pet to his or her annual veterinarian examination is the best way to keep informed about your pet’s weight status and the best practices for maintaining a healthy weight," Miller says. 
 
Image via Shutterstock
 





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Bunny Survives Traumatic Abuse Thanks to Vets and Rescuers http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/bunny-survives-abuse-34286









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Bunny Survives Traumatic Abuse Thanks to Vets and Rescuers


By Aly Semigran    June 07, 2016 at 10:11AM / (0) comments










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Fuzzy Pants is the bunny with a sweet and adorable name, whose headline-grabbing story out of Jacksonville, Fla., was anything but.
 
In May, the months-old rabbit was badly injured when a group of teenage girls threw the animal against a wall and shared the abuse on Snapchat. The teens in question were arrested on animal cruelty charges and the bunny was taken into care by Southwest Florida House Rabbit Rescue. 
 
Fuzzy Pants suffered a fractured thigh bone and a broken pelvis, among other injuries, from the incident. She received medical care and eventually underwent surgery at Tampa's BluePearl Veterinary Partners facility.
 
According to a press release, "BluePearl veterinarians performed surgery to remove the upper tip of the rabbit’s right hind femur, or thigh bone, where it had been broken. Fuzzy Pants also suffered two pelvic fractures, which are starting to heal."
 
Dr. Scott Fowler of BluePearl, who was one of the vets to care for Fuzzy Pants, says that the bunny is recovering nicely and thinks the animal will be "perfectly fine." 
 
After her procedure, Fuzzy Pants was released back to Southwest Florida House Rabbit Rescue.
 
"Fuzzy Pants is doing remarkably well," says Jennifer Macbeth, the organization's president. "Physically she is moving around and playful. She can't use her right leg, but we hope with time she will be able to hop on it. She is also very sweet and craves affection... I think she is just glad to be safe and loved."
 
Macbeth hopes that this bunny's heartbreaking story will inspire others to foster rabbits and ensure that these incredible creatures get the proper care and love they deserve. 
 
"Fosters are so important to a rescue," she says. "Most rabbit rescues are small and don't have a facility, so they need foster homes. They are highly social animals, needing daily affection and exercise. Just like a cat or dog, they are domesticated and deserve the same high standard of care. Fosters provide socialization, litter box training, exercise, and love—helping the rabbits to be happy and healthy."
 
Fuzzy Pants will remain in Macbeth's care until she recovers and can be placed for adoption. "She has a warrior's spirit to have survived her ordeal. Girl power at it's best!"
 
Image via BluePearl Veterinary Partners 





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Is Bread Helpful for a Dog’s Digestion? http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/bread-helpful-dogs-digestion-34277









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Is Bread Helpful for a Dog’s Digestion?


By Jennifer Coates    June 06, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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Have you heard the “old wives tale” that feeding dogs bread can make their upset stomachs better? Well, this is one instance when the “old wives” know what they’re talking about… at least under certain circumstances.
 
Here are three situations when feeding bread to dogs can be helpful.
 
1. Your Dog Has Eaten Something with Sharp Points or Edges
Dogs like to chew on bones, but sometimes they go overboard and end up swallowing sharp shards. Dogs have also been known to eat needles, nails, skewers—you name it and a dog has probably tried to eat it. Sharp points and edges can do a lot of damage as they travel through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the most severe cases, they can perforate the esophagus, stomach, or intestines, allowing the contents of the GI tract to spill into the surrounding body part. If the abdominal cavity becomes contaminated in this way, a potentially fatal condition called peritonitis will develop.
 
When dogs eat a large meal of bread after ingesting something sharp, the bread can encase the foreign material, allowing it to pass more safely through the GI tract. Bread can also help protect the esophagus from sharp bits if a dog eventually vomits or is given medicine to make him do so. Some people recommend white bread, others whole grain. I don’t think it matters. Whatever you have on hand will do.
 
2. Your Dog Has Eaten a Long Piece of String, Yarn, Thread, or Something Similar
Long pieces of string, yarn, thread, etc., go by the name “linear foreign bodies” in vet-speak. Often, one end of a linear foreign body will becoming anchored somewhere along the intestinal tract. When this happens, the peristaltic action of the intestines cause them to move their way up the string. The intestines become pleated like an accordion, which prevents them from working normally. Left untreated, linear foreign bodies can also cut through the intestinal wall, resulting in peritonitis.
 
A meal of bread after ingesting a linear foreign body can help the material wad up into a clump and pass through the GI tract.
 
3. Your Dog Has a Mild, Upset Tummy
I know I’ve experienced this. Sometimes I skip a meal, or maybe I eat something that doesn’t agree with me, but whatever the cause, my stomach reacts poorly and feels “acidy.” Eating a piece of bread can help. What’s going on? I suspect the bread acts like a sponge and traps whatever is irritating my stomach, allowing it to move further down the GI tract without causing more trouble. The same scenario appears to occur with dogs. If you think your dog’s stomach is just a bit off, feeding some bread may help.
 
Of course, bread is not a cure-all. If your dog vomits more than a couple of times, has profuse diarrhea, is in pain, or is very lethargic, skip the bread and head straight to the veterinary clinic.





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Blue Buffalo Recalls Select ‘Life Protection Formula’ Dog Food Products http://www.petmd.com/news/alerts-recalls/blue-buffalo-recalls-select-life-protection-formula-dog-food-products-34264









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Blue Buffalo Recalls Select ‘Life Protection Formula’ Dog Food Products


By Vladimir Negron    June 03, 2016 at 12:47PM / (0) comments










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Blue Buffalo, a Connecticut-based pet food manufacturer, is voluntarily recalling select lots of its Life Protection Formula Fish and Sweet Potato Recipe for Dogs due to high moisture levels, which could potentially result in mold growth in affected products.
 
The following lot codes are affected by this Blue Buffalo recall:
 
Description: Life Protection Formula Fish and Sweet Potato Recipe for Dogs, 30lb
UPC: 8596100032
Best By Date: APR 11 17
Lot Code: AH 2A 1208-1400
 
The affected Life Protection Formula Fish and Sweet Potato Recipe for Dogs products can be identified by the “best before” date found on the bottom right of the back right panel, as shown in the image below:
 

 
Blue Buffalo is not aware of any dogs becoming ill from this issue. However, they are urging consumers who purchased affected product(s) to stop feeding their dogs from the recalled bags and to bring the product to the original place of purchase for a full refund.
 
If you have questions about this dog food recall, please contact Blue Buffalo Customer Service at 1-800-919-2833, Monday – Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm MST.
 





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Rescue Organization Rallies to Save Cat Abandoned On the Streets of Brooklyn http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/rescue-organization-saves-cat-abandoned-streets-brooklyn-34252









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Rescue Organization Rallies to Save Cat Abandoned On the Streets of Brooklyn


By Aly Semigran    June 03, 2016 at 09:45AM / (0) comments










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It's the picture that broke the Internet's heart. A crying kitty, presumably dropped off outside by its owners, left with only its litter box and a few items on the streets of Brooklyn, New York. 
 
A resident of the Prospect-Lefferts Gardens neighborhood in Brooklyn snapped the photo of the cat—now known as Nostrand—and posted it to the Facebook page of FAT Cats (Flatbush Area Team for Cats). FAT Cats is a volunteer group which helps to vaccinate/spay/neuter and find homes for feral and abandoned cats in the area. 
 
Unfortunately, before FAT Cats could get to Nostrand to save him, a street cleaner had scared the feline off. As volunteers, members, and friends of the organization looked for Nostrand, fate intervened, and the kitty wound up in the backyard of a TNR-certified caretaker a few days later. With that, FAT Cat's Elizabeth Champ, LCSW, picked him up and took him to the veterinarian. 
 
"He had no microchip, was not neutered, had fleas and an ear infection," Champ tells petMD. "He has since been treated for the fleas and ear infection (from which he is still recovering) and was neutered."
 
"He is a sweet, primarily healthy cat and it seems clear that he was owned and loved," she notes. "We hope that whoever put him out, for whatever reason it was, finds out that he is safe." Nostrand is currently in a loving foster environment as FAT Cat works to find his new forever home. 
 

 
Champ says that abandoned cats like Nostrand—whether they are left out for financial reasons or an owner not knowing how to deal with a cat's behavioral issues—are, unfortunately, an all-too-common problem that can be remedied. 
 
"If you know you can’t keep your cat, we recommend reaching out to family and friends, small rescue groups, and shelters." Champ advises."We do NOT recommend simply releasing cats outside. House cats are not prepared to live outside, and often become frightened and endangered."    
 
Nostrand's tale, which could have been tragic, is raising awareness about this issue and inspiring many to get involved with their own area's local rescue organizations. If you do want to lend a hand and help cats like Nostrand get a second chance, Champ says that the work involved with rescue efforts is all worth it. "It's a wonderful way to get to know neighbors, other animal lovers and to help create the change you want to see" she says. 
 
Donations for Nostrand's ongoing veterinary needs to can be made here. 
 
Images via FAT Cats Facebook 





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Study Shows How Cats and Dogs Help People Cope With Social Rejection http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/study-shows-how-cats-and-dogs-help-people-cope-social-rejection-34223
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Adjusting the Body’s Microbiome to Treat Skin Allergies in Dogs http://www.petmd.com/news/view/adjusting-bodys-microbiome-treat-skin-allergies-dogs-34190









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Adjusting the Body’s Microbiome to Treat Skin Allergies in Dogs


By Jennifer Coates    May 30, 2016 at 07:00AM / (0) comments










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Allergies are an increasingly frequent problem for dogs, mirroring a similar trend in people. The reason why is still unclear, but this and the similarity between some types of allergies in dogs and people have led to interesting research that could benefit both species.
 
The most common form of allergies in dogs goes by the name atopic dermatitis (AD). Here’s how I defined the condition in my book Dictionary of Veterinary Terms, Vet Speak Deciphered for the Non-Veterinarian:
 
Atopic dermatitis n. inflammation of the skin that is caused by a genetic tendency to have allergic reactions….
 
And here’s how the condition in people is described by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology:
 
Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a chronic or recurrent inflammatory skin disease. "Atopic" means that there is typically a genetic tendency toward allergic disease….
 
Pretty similar, right? That’s why I took interest in a paper that recently appeared in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, not a publication that many veterinarians frequent.
 
In the study, researchers looked at the microbiome—the naturally occurring population of microbes—on the skin of 32 dogs (15 with atopic dermatitis and 17 without). They compared the microbiomes before, during, and after the dogs with atopic dermatitis developed symptoms and were treated with antibiotics to help them recover. They found that that during a flare-up, dogs with atopic dermatitis “had almost ten times” the proportion of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, the bacterial species primarily responsible for common skin infections in dogs. The researchers also saw an increase in Corynebacterium species, “as they typically do in humans with AD,” and observed “a decrease in the skin’s protective barrier.” After antibiotic therapy was finished, all of these parameters returned to normal.
 
“In both canine and human atopic dermatitis, we hypothesize there is a similar relationship among skin barrier function, the immune system, and microbes, even if the individual microbe species aren’t identical,” said senior author Elizabeth A. Grice, PhD, an assistant professor of Dermatology and Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
“The hope is that insights gained from this study and others like it will enable us one day to treat this condition by altering the skin’s microbiome without antibiotics.”
 
Impairment in the skin’s ability to work as a “barrier” to keep moisture in and harmful bacteria out is considered a possible factor in triggering or advancing AD.
 
“We don’t know if the bacterial overgrowth is weakening the skin’s barrier function or a weakening of the barrier is enabling the bacterial overgrowth, but we do know now that they’re correlated, and that’s a novel finding,” Grice said.
 
To me, this research provides support for the way that many veterinarians now recommend managing cases of atopic dermatitis in dogs:

Frequent bathing to remove allergic triggers that are so easily trapped in a dog’s coat, near their skin
Fatty acid supplements given orally and/or topically to help improve the skin’s ability to act as a barrier
When necessary, antibiotics to normalize the microbiome of the skin
Medications and/or desensitization to reduce a dog’s tendency for allergic reactions

 
Talk to your veterinarian if you have a dog with atopic dermatitis to determine what form of combination therapy is most appropriate based on the details of the case.
 
*
 
You can learn more about allergies in dogs here, at the petMD Dog Allergy Center.
 
 
Source
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
 





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Kitten Survives 130-Mile Trek in a Car's Engine Compartment http://www.petmd.com/news/cat/kitten-survives-130-mile-trek-cars-engine-compartment-34199







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Kitten Survives 130-Mile Trek in a Car's Engine Compartment


By Aly Semigran    May 25, 2016 at 09:46AM / (1) comments










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It's rare that getting a flat tire can be considered a blessing in disguise, but that was exactly the case for a kitten who was found under the hood of a car in Birmingham, Alabama. 
 
When a family traveling from Atlanta, Georgia, hit a pothole, it caused their car to get a flat, which prompted them to call the Jefferson County police in Birmingham for assistance. Once help arrived, Sheriff Deputy Tim Sanford noticed a faint cry coming from the vehicle's engine compartment. 
 
After opening the hood of the car, Deputy Sanford discovered a tiny kitten stuck inside. The small feline was likely trapped in there for 130 miles. 
 
Sanford (pictured above with the lucky feline he rescued) named the kitten, fittingly, Atlanta, and then called the Animal Care and Control (ACC) division of the Greater Birmingham Humane Society for further help in rehabilitating her. 
 
Despite some burns from the engine (which are already healing), Atlanta is in good shape. According to the GBHS, Atlanta will be held for a state-mandated stray hold period and then taken to Alabama Shelter Veterinarians to be spayed, vaccinated, dewormed, microchipped, and given a full medical evaluation. She'll then be placed for adoption.  
 
Holly Baker, the director of ACC, tells petMD that the inspiring Atlanta is "thriving" health-wise and has a "spunky personality" to boot. While Atlanta may be the poster kitty for resilience, she's also a reminder, particularly during the busy summer travel season, to always be aware of animals when you are traveling. 
 
"It is more common to see cats inside of cars in the winter, but not unusual for any time of year," Baker says. "If you see an animal in distress, please call local law enforcement and alert them to the situation. They will alert the proper animal control authorities."
 
Baker also reminds pet lovers that as temperatures rise, it's especially important to be mindful of animals and cars.
 
"Do NOT leave animals in a hot car," she says. "If outside, ensure you have plenty of fresh water for your pets and find shade if they become overheated. If it’s too hot for you, it is definitely too hot for them!" 
 
Image via Greater Birmingham Humane Society 





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KatWrangler AWWWWW 06/03/2016 05:05pm There is nothing more adorable than a big man holding a tiny kitty Reply to this comment Report abuse 10


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How This Groundbreaking Children's Book is Helping Families Cope With the Loss of a Pet http://www.petmd.com/news/dog/how-groundbreaking-book-helping-families-cope-loss-pet-34192







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How This Groundbreaking Children's Book is Helping Families Cope With the Loss of a Pet


By Aly Semigran    May 23, 2016 at 03:31PM / (0) comments










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"How am I going to explain this to my kids?" 
 
It's a question that Dr. Corey Gut, DVM, was asked a lot in her line of work by pet parents who were faced with the loss of their beloved animal. 
 
The question became a personal endeavor for Dr. Gut to help answer when her sister's dog Bailey was diagnosed with liver cancer. "My sister’s daughter, my niece Lexi, was extremely attached to this dog and at the time she was an only child and very young and this was going to be her first experience with death," Gut tells petMD.
 
When her sister discovered there were limited resources to help parents out in this situation, Gut wrote a book specifically for her niece called Being Brave For Bailey. A family project in every sense of the word (Gut's mother provided the illustrations for the book), she began altering the book for different patients and their families to help them through their own time of grief. 
 
The book was striking a nerve with families who were looking for ways to help their children understand what was happening, and to let them properly mourn. With that, Gut (who works at DePorre Animal Hospital in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.) launched a successful Kickstarter campaign to make the book accessible to everyone, and since then, Being Brave For Bailey has been making an impact in households and libraries across the country. Gut says she has received countless thank you letters, emails, and cards from pet parents all over expressing their gratitude. Gut saves all of these tokens in a binder. 
 
"The response has been amazing and it’s such an emotional thing for me because, I’m sure as every veterinarian can agree, one of the most difficult things we deal with is euthanasia," she says. "You feel so desperate, so helpless—you want to make everything okay.” 
 
Being Brave For Bailey follows the journey of a child's relationship with her dog from a young age, to the dog getting older and sicker, to, eventually, the always difficult decision to end the dog's life. Gut (pictured below with her dog Vinnie) says the inclusion of euthanasia was important to include because, "That’s very hard for someone of any age, but [it's especially difficult] for a child to understand the concept.” 
 

 
Gut, who collaborated with licensed therapists and guidance counselors on the project, explains that one of the most important factors in helping a child through this, is to have them be part of the process. "Children can often resent their parents for the decision being made," Gut says, but by allowing them to have some control in the situation, it becomes "extremely therapeutic for them." 
 
For instance, a parent can ask a child for their input on matters like what kind of tree should be planted in the pet's honor, or what object (be it a bone or a blanket) should be buried with the animal. 
 
The vet also points out that language is important when it comes to talking to kids about this heartbreaking subject. Rather than phrases like 'Put to sleep,' it's better to use words like 'dead' or 'death' to avoid future confusion. Same goes for the 'Dog went to the farm' routine. Gut acknowledges that parents are doing their best and protecting their children's feelings, but in the long run, using succinct and direct phrases can serve as a healthy and valuable tool throughout life. 
 
While Gut says that every family's channels of communication are different, she hopes the book can "leave that avenue open" for honest discussions about how they are feeling. 
 
She tells petMD that while she's had requests for a cat version of the book, the response has, overwhelmingly been positive from all types of pet owners of every age range. "This has been an amazing experience, all around for me, helping families through such a tough issue.” 
 
Being Brave For Bailey is available for purchase and/or donation through the book's official website. 
 
Images via Jaime Meyers; Jim Hoover





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A Rescue Cat's Broken Jaw Was Repaired and Now Resembles a Permanent Smile http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/rescue-cats-broken-jaw-repaired-and-now-resembles-permanent-smile-34191







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A Rescue Cat's Broken Jaw Was Repaired and Now Resembles a Permanent Smile


By Aly Semigran    May 23, 2016 at 10:24AM / (1) comments










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Duchess, who has become something of an Internet celebrity and is known as the 'Miracle Kitty,' has plenty to smile about these days. Not only is the rescue cat—who was found very badly hurt—now living in a safe and loving forever home, but she's recovering wonderfully thanks to the dedicated staff of the Adobe Animal Hospital and Clinic in El Paso, Texas.    
 
Last October, the Siamese cat was brought into the facility clinging to life after a concerned citizen found her injured and suffering outside of an apartment complex. "The cause of her injuries was unknown," Bryan Meyer, DVM, of the Adode Animal Hospital and Clinic tells petMD. "Being hit by a car is likely, but abuse could not be ruled out as there were no other injuries or evidence of being hit by a car. The only trauma was to the face/head."    
 
Meyer explains that the cat's jaw was completely dislocated on the left side, but the major injury was "a comminuted fracture to the ramus [a portion of a bone] of her right mandible." Duchess was also very malnourished and covered in scars.
 
Euthanasia was initially considered for the cat (who is estimated to be around 3-years-old) because she was a stray with such extensive injuries. Duchess required multiple surgeries, with no guarantee of recovery.
 
Still, the staff at Adobe couldn't help but feel this feline was a fighter and wanted to give her a second chance at life. "Something about her instantly tugged on our heartstrings," Meyer says. "She would constantly purr, look at us with those crossed eyes, and rubbed up on everyone so lovingly; even with the pain she was in." 
 
With that—after she had been stabilized with pain medications, antibiotics, and IV fluid therapy—the vets decided to move on with her surgery. 
 
"We wired the front part of her mandible together to repair the fractured symphysis," Meyer tells us. "Then the real challenge began, attempting to repair her shattered ramus. Working with limited resources for this extensive repair, we were able to wire a small piece of bone of the ramus to the body of the mandible. This type of repair was not done to restore function of the jaw, but rather to stabilize the fractured area and allow it to heal." 
 
The kitty's prognosis was still not in the clear, but after giving her a feeding tube and maintaining post-op care, the hopes were still high for her. After spending a month in the hospital, Duchess learned to eat on her own by consuming a "soup" of food mixed with water created by the staff. Eventually, Duchess underwent a second procedure to remove some of her teeth because they were irritating her tongue and causing swelling. 
 
But even through all this, Meyer says that Duchess maintained a good attitude and was always striving to get stronger and better by the day.
 
Once she recovered from her procedures, Duchess—whose repaired jaw remains crooked—was able to be adopted, and was eventually taken into the care of a loving family who understands exactly what is needed to care for this remarkable and resilient cat. 
 
Meyer tells petMD that there are no long-term issues related to Duchess's injuries, and that follow-up procedures have been discussed, but may not be necessary. 
 
"At this point, we would need to perform a CT scan of the skull to fully analyze the area of fracture and healing. Once a CT scan has been performed, we can consult with a surgical specialist to see if any further surgeries could be done to correct the damage," he says. "Regardless of what happens, we know that she has a long, happy life ahead of her."
 
Image via Duchess the Miracle Kitty Facebook 





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KatWrangler 06/17/2016 01:37pm After all that suffering, I'm happy Duchess found her forever home with people who can give her the life she deserves.
Who could say No to that adorable face !
I'd take her in a NY minute Reply to this comment Report abuse 15


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http://www.petmd.com/news/lifestyle-entertainment/rescue-cats-broken-jaw-repaired-and-now-resembles-permanent-smile-34191#comments Lifestyle & Entertainment Mon, 23 May 2016 14:24:55 +0000 34191 at http://www.petmd.com