Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.


FDNY Rescues Dog Trapped in Five-Alarm Fire

By Aly Semigran    June 29, 2017 / (0) comments

On June 28, a five-alarm fire blazed through a Manhattan high-rise, creating a life-or-death rescue situation for the people and animals inside. 

 

According to the New York Post, one of the building's residents, Melissa Dibbs, was not home at the time of the fire, but rushed to the scene to get to her dog who was still inside.

 

Dibbs is the pet parent to a Chihuahua named Finnegan. When she couldn't get inside to save her dog, she alerted members of the FDNY's Ladder 11 for help. (According to reports, more than 200 fire and EMS personnel responded to the scene.) In a post on the department's Facebook page, Dibbs showed firefighters a photo of her dog, along with her apartment number, so they could get to the canine. 

 

Despite police orders that no one could go back in, firefighters with Ladder 11 took matters into their own hands and rushed into the building to retrieve Finnegan. And that is exactly what they did, returning from Dibbs’ third-floor apartment with a shaken, but alive and well Finnegan. 

 

"When they came back down, I was so relieved and happy. I couldn't stop saying thank you," stated Dibbs, pictured above with Finnegan as he has a drink of water after his rescue. 

 

Dibbs, who has her dog safely back in her arms, did the right thing in such dangerous circumstances. The National Fire Prevention Agency urges pet parents never to go into a fire to rescue their pets. Instead, they should tell the fire department that their pet is trapped inside, so that trained professionals can attempt to locate the animal. 

 

Image via FDNY Facebook 

 

Read more: Firefighters Rescue Dog From 6-Foot Sinkhole 

 


 
MORE FROM PETMD.COM