Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

Pet Family

Urinary Tract 'Stones' in Ferrets

Urolithiasis in Ferrets

 

Urolithiasis is a condition where certain compounds called uroliths form in the urinary tract. Made of stones, crystals, or calculi, the uroliths are caused by metabolic and dietary factors that affect the acidity of the ferret's blood. Ferrets with this condition suffer from secondary bacterial infections and pain due to the rubbing of the uroliths against the urinary tract.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Uroliths are rough in nature, causing the ferret's urethra, urinary bladder, or kidneys to become inflamed. Kidneys can also become inflamed due to secondary bacterial infections. Ferrets suffering from urolithiasis will lick or bite the urinary area. And while some are unable to urinate or at least urinate properly, others frequently urinate but only in small amounts, leaving the fur around the perineum damp. In severe cases, urolithiasis may lead to renal failure. Some other symptoms include:

 

  • Painful and difficult urination
  • Cloudy urine
  • Bloody urine
  • Foul-smelling urine
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dehydration

 

The consistency of uroliths depends on the types of minerals or solutions in the formations. For example, urolithiasis struvite stones consist of magnesium ammonium phosphate and causes the ferret's urine to become highly alkaline, and urolithiasis cystine stones consist of calcium oxalate, causing the urine to become highly acidic. Meanwhile, ammonium acid urates and silicate stones cause the urine pH to become either neutral or acidic.

 

Causes

 

Urolithiasis is most common in middle-aged to older ferrets (3 to 7 years), especially males. Risk factors include the consumption of dog food, poor quality cat food, or diets with plant-based proteins. Abnormal retention of urine can also lead to urolithiasis.

 

Diagnosis

 

Other than observing the ferret's clinical symptoms, the veterinarian may recommend X-rays and urine examinations to confirm the diagnosis. Culture and sensitivity tests may be required if secondary bacterial infections are present.

 

Comments  0

Leave Comment

Related Articles

Difficult, Painful And Frequent Urination In ...
Pollakiuria refers to abnormally frequent urination, and dysuria is a condition that...
READ MORE
Lower Urinary Tract Infection in Ferrets
Bacteria invade and colonize in the urinary bladder and/or the upper portion of the...
READ MORE
Fluid Buildup in the Kidney Due to Kidney or ...
Usually one-sided and occurring secondary to complete or partial obstruction of the...
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»

PETMD POLL

What do you use to prevent ticks from feeding on your pet?

Around the Web

MORE FROM PETMD.COM