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Enlarged Liver in Ferrets

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Treatment

 

Treatment is highly variable and will depend on the underlying cause. Ultimately, the aim is to treat the cause, optimize conditions for liver regeneration, prevent further complications, and reverse the damage caused by liver failure. Because dehydration is commonly associated with hepatomegaly, intravenous fluids are often required for normalizing the ferret's fluid levels. Multivitamins are also given to maintain the healthy levels of vitamins. In case of a tumor, abscess, or cyst, your veterinarian may also require surgical interventions to remove these growths.

 

Living and Management

 

You will need to restrict the activity of your pet and allow it to rest and recover comfortably in a cage. If your ferret refuses to eat, it may be more accepting of high-calorie dietary supplements. Warming the food to body temperature or offering via syringe may also increase acceptance. Lastly, restrict you ferret's sodium intake if it suffered from cardiac failure or liver disease, as it may cause fluid buildup in the abdominal cavity.

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