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Herb 'N' Living: Growing a Home Garden for Your Pet

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Rosemary, another immune booster, is ideal for the indoor gardener, as long as it is trimmed regularly. Rosemary is one of the hardiest of the perennials, but it is prone to root rot if it is over watered. Care must be taken to keep the soil balanced.

 

And what pet-friendly garden would be complete without grass? A trip to your local health food store will find you a handful of wheat berries or barley grass seeds, which you can germinate in a rich soil. For the best results, cover the pot with plastic wrap and keep it in a dim location until the seeds have sprouted. You can then move it to a sunny spot within reach of your pet, and begin the next grass pot so that your pet always has a fresh supply. For an outdoor garden, set aside a grass plot just for your dog or cat to visit.

 

Many of these herbs bud beautiful flowers as they mature, making them wonderful additions to your living space. But if you wish to keep them growing longer through the year, you will want to remove the flower tops before they go to seed, since this signals to the plant that it is time to die.

 

In addition, grouping according to the herb’s type is not always necessary. Many plants will grow in harmony together, while others need to be cultivated, pruned regularly, or deflowered in their own space to prevent them from taking over the garden or dying. Another way to inhibit herb growth is to keep the plant in the pot when placing it in the ground or on your windowsill.

 

If you do plan on growing the herbs indoors, you will need a window that gets bright, indirect sun, or a fluorescent grow light. Keep in mind that even indoor plants are prone to pests. If necessary, spray your plants’ leaves with a water and soap mixture, or a chemical spray that is labeled for use with edible plants. Fertilizers must also be non-toxic and labeled as edible.

 

Now that you know how easy it is to grow an herb garden, we hope that you consult with your veterinarian about some other pet-friendly plants to add to your garden. You can also check out our articles: Ten Herbs to Improve Your Cat's Health and Eight Herbs to Improve Your Dog's Health.

 

Image: ahenobarbus / via Flickr

 

 

Comments  2

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  • milk thistle
    06/08/2012 07:42am

    our 12 year's cairn terrier Michy has liver failure ,I consider give him Milk thistle supplement.Is it harmless?or for natural plant ,how to give dog?

  • 07/30/2013 11:50am

    I love the idea of having an indoor garden! We live in a basement apartment so we might have to get a grow light but I can't wait to see how my dog reacts to the little bit of outdoors we will make for him!


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