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Top Ten 'Small Breed' Dogs

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Great Things Do Come In Small Packages

Sure, small dogs are cute, and some of them look cuddly, but not all small dog breeds have meek personalities. Like people, small dog breeds come with different personalities, so before you pick up your small, cute friend, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re getting. Here are our 10 favorite "small breed" dogs.

 

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#10 Skye Terrier

Not a dog to get if you own cats, as it dislikes those of the feline persuasion. Otherwise, the Skye Terrier is extremely dependable, gets along fine with people, and is a great family pet. It is also a great dog for avid outdoorsmen.

#9 Pekingese

This small but ferocious dog is a faithful companion. The Pekingese's aggressive nature, however, does make it unsuitable for a family with other pets and kids. Its thick undercoat and coarse overcoat also requires a lot of grooming.

#8 Dachshund

Believe it or not, the Dachshund actually makes an excellent watchdog and was bred to exterminate vermin! It is very attached to owner and family, but can be aggressive around unfamiliar children. The daring, adventurous and curious Dachshund is also fond of digging, hunting, chasing game, and tracking by scent.

#7 Bichon Frisé

The small-framed Bichon Frisé gets along well with children and other animals. Known for its white puffy coat and curious name, the Bichon Frisé is considered an active, easily trained dog. Overall, a wonderful breed for families and individuals alike.

#6 Shih Tzu

While it does no shed, it does require daily grooming. The Shih Tzu, also known as the "mini lion," makes for a good family dog -- it is very friendly and gets along with all creatures (even children).

#5 Maltese

A good dog for those with allergies (it’s not a big shedder), the Maltese is friendly and often gets along well with other dogs and even cats. The Maltese doen't like to be left alone too much, though, as it was bred as a companion dog.

#4 Jack Russell Terrier

Do not choose this breed if you’re looking for a quiet dog that likes to lounge around being pampered all day. The Jack Russell is an active breed that loves to jump up on furniture, run around and lead a generally boisterous, happy existence. However, proper training can help make the dog calmer.

#3 Boston Terrier

A great family dog, the Boston Terrier is friendly and bonds well with kids. Another plus is it doesn’t require a ton of grooming. But be warned, it loves to munch on household items, so lots of chew toys are definitely recommended. You should probably keep anything you don't want destroyed out of this dog's way, too.

#2 Chihuahua

Meek though it may look, the small Chihuahua can really pack a punch in attitude. It is known for nipping at children (probably not the best choice for a house with kids) or barking incessantly at strange dogs. It can also be loud and demanding. But before you say no, the Chihuahua is loyal and affectionate, and it's even been known to get along with cats (after an adjustment period, of course).

#1 Pomeranian

The Pomeranian is an adorable, mellow and gentle dog, but it can sometimes get noisy (just like children). As a matter of fact, if you want a Pomeranian, it is great with kids, just as long as it's introduced as a puppy. Despite this, the Pomeranian, which sheds profusely, may not be the best choice for a house with very small children.

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Comments  41

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  • Breed Please?
    12/05/2012 07:58pm

    What breed is the little white puppy with the red bow? It does not say. Thank you.

  • First Dog
    02/06/2013 12:57pm

    It's a Pom,

    However I'm in the puppy business providing a screening service for puppy buyers. We don't breed puppies, but we inspect kennels, interview breeders, and review breeding stock to ensure the customer gets a non puppy mill pup.

    We are definitely [b]NOT[/b] seeing a demand for most of the breeds listed. In fact we are seeing a decline in most of those breeds.

    Skye Terriers - are not even available in most states
    Pekingese - limited requests for this breed. But great dogs.
    Dachshund - limited popularity, usually wanted by previous owners
    Bichon Frisé - a rapid decline in 2009, has not picked up since.
    Shih Tzu - always popular including mixes with this breed.
    Maltese - still very popular
    Jack Russell Terrier - almost cannot give them away. HYPER!
    Boston Terrier - popular
    Chihuahua - very popular if cute
    Pomeranian - always a hot seller

    This has been our experience.

  • I own a Pomeranian
    02/07/2013 09:00am

    I own a Pomeranian, and, have either owned, or known people who did own most of these other breeds, and found that about the ONLY thing that I could agree with, was that the Poms have great personalities.
    But, mine does NOT "shed profusely", not even close.
    From what I know of dogs, and just common sense, most of what is in this article makes NO sense whatsoever.
    My Pom' does NOT shed profusely, because their fur is very much like a long haired cat's hair, almost like cotton candy.
    My dog's fur matts horribly and has to be thinned out, and brushed with a slicker brush and cut or shaved down.
    But, because it all clings to itself, it doesn't shed much at all.
    The dog breeds that, "shed profusely" are all of the shorter haired dogs who have "hair" rather than "fur".
    We have known people who had beagles, pugs, or any number of the breeds who have "hair" all over, rather than "fur". They shed profusely all of the time, and it all just falls off all over the place.
    Many people I know, have gotten a shorter haired dog, thinking that logically that would mean that they would NOT be dealing with a lot of hair or fur all over the place, and been horrified to find out that it is the exact opposite.
    But, really, telling people that a dog that has short legs, and a huge amount of fur hanging down all over it's body and lower legs, and underbelly would be a "great hunting dog"?
    That poor dog wold be so full of burs and all kinds of sticks and crap from the woods, and would likely even get caught on wild rose bushes to the point that it might be unable to even get free, and would need to be cut free with scissors or a rechargable sheer.
    You would never want to take a dog like that out hunting.
    And, the most amusing thing is that the article is titled "Top Ten Samll Breed Dogs", and then they spend the entire article showing you dogs that are NOT popular, and telling you that they aren't good with kids or other pets, etc."?
    The article sounds like it's intent is to show you some small dogs that would make great pets, and then they show you all these ones that are NOT great pets? And, yes. The Pekinese USED to be a polular breed, that has gone out of style, as has the Jack Russell Terrier, and the Boston Terrier. The entire article came across as written by someone who actually knows very little about most of these dog breeds, or how much they shed, or even what would make sense to do with various breeds, just based on common sense, based on their amount of fur or short legs, noses, etc. Plus they show the 1st dog, and then give you NO information at all of what breed it even is?
    My 15 yr. old has written better informed and more accurate articles than this for school.

  • Small Breed
    02/08/2013 02:03pm

    I dont' see the Brussel Griffons in this list. What's the matter with you guys? Don't you know the best of the breeds is a Griff?

  • Japanese Chin
    02/09/2013 12:50pm

    Hey All!

    I'm a noob to this site but am glad to have found it! My husband and I are the parents of two absolutely lovely girls (both spayed, of course)- one is a Miniature Poodle and one is a Japanese Chin. I'm surprised they aren't mentioned, although since this is just a "popularity" thing, perhaps that is why. Nonetheless for anyone looking for wonderful small-dog breeds, I'd highly recommend either one. Contrary to what many people seem to think, the Poodle is NOT "yappy"- our Precious is a loving, intelligent and completely delightful companion. The Chin (Gaz)is very quiet also - in fact the only time she ever makes noise is when my husband gets her "wound up" when playing, and then her "bark" is more like a comical "snuffle." Chins are affectionate and full of personality, and absolutely hilarious in play mode, especially when doing the "Chin spin" lol. They do shed and so should be brushed frequently, but that being said for all of their long hair they aren't prone to matting like many long-haired breeds. When she's not keeping us in stitches with her play antics, Gaz is perfectly happy curled up in my (or my husband's) lap while we're at the computer, reading or watching a movie. I've also owned a Bichon, and would get another one in a minute - they're such happy, sweet little dogs! An added bonus - None of these breeds has any "doggy" smell at all. Our girls are clean, quiet, amusing, loving and have never destroyed anything - even as puppies - they don't even chew up their "kids" (their stuffed toys). We love them so much and could never imagine our lives without a Poodle, Chin and/or Bichon! Small dogs rock!

  • Min pins
    02/17/2013 08:29am

    I love every breed out there. And, taking into consideration the irresponsible breeding that takes place once a breed becomes popular, maybe i should be happy my favorite is not on the list. But, i still have to give my vote to the miniature pinscher. Funny, proud, loyal and kid loving little family members! Healthy and so easy to keep. Only negative...winter is hard on their litle feet! LOVE this breed!

  • Pekingese
    02/19/2013 12:58pm

    I have to comment about the Pekingese. My Peke is hardly ferocious. She is well socialized, loves people, other dogs, and our cat. She is a good warning system, as she will bark if someone is at the door. I have had her for nearly 8 years and she is an absolutely loving companion. It is true that their coats require a lot of grooming. In the spring and summer she receives a "puppy cut". She requires 3-4 short haircuts because her hair grows back so quickly.

    When deciding which puppy to get, I picked the one that was the most loving, friendly, and alert. She is an absolute doll baby.

  • Chihuahua
    02/19/2013 01:22pm

    I have had four chihuahuas and my sister has had two - none of them were as you described. They never "nipped" at children, even when the children were overzealous with their petting or pulled on their tales or legs. The dogs just run into their kennels b/c that's their safe place. We, the owners, would tell the children that when the dogs are in there, they're not to be bothered b/c it means they want to be alone. We trained the dogs to use it as their safe place. The dogs never barked incessantly or were overly demanding. I think these things are a large misconception of this breed b/c owners think that their misbehavior is "cute" and don't train the dogs properly. Chihuahuas have large personalities and, if allowed, will take over the house. They must be trained just like larger dogs and not allowed to misbehave. They will learn that their owners are the "alpha" and these dogs will be the best companions for adults and children alike.

  • Havanese
    02/20/2013 05:56pm

    Once again the Havanese are skipped. Smart like a Border Collie, Cute as a Shih Tzu and willing to please as a Lab. Bred to herd chickens they are called "the velcro dog" for their desire to be near their owner at all times.

  • 02/28/2014 03:28pm

    Couldn't agree more William. We have a 2.5 year old Havanese. He is THE BEST dog I have ever had. Incredible temperment with my two girls, obedient and smart as a whip!

  • 04/07/2014 11:48pm

    Havanese are the best. I have owned poodles for years and while their intelligence is amazing, the Havanese have the best temperment. I have two now that are the most pleasant dogs that I have ever owned. I have never heard either one of them growl. Their tales are always wagging. The worst thing about them is that they do stick to you like velcro. They hate to see you go out without them.

  • PUG!
    02/21/2013 02:01am

    Surprised the most wonderful pug is not mentioned! Generally they are great with everyone as they were bred solely for companionship - of course every breed has exceptions. I'm a volunteer foster/coordinator with a local pug rescue and have many pugs in and out. In my opinion they are not only the #1 breed for me but they are one of the greatest things to ever walk the earth. However, I do not agree with the statement that pekes cannot be in a house with other pets. Mine do fine with the pugs and my 3 cats. One is 18 yrs and the other is 11 yrs. Now pug mixes, on the other hand, I have found most to be a neurotic mess. Chugs (chihuahua/pug)that I have fostered are high strung, full of nervous energy, demanding, pushy and whiny. Unfortunately, most pug mixes take after the breed they are bred with and hence a lot (to be honest most, if not all!) of the pug charm is lost. However, all breeds are wonderful and all deserve to have devoted people that are dedicated to each and every breed.

  • small dogs
    02/28/2013 10:39am

    (I think the first dog shown with the red bow is a Pom, but I could be wrong.)

    You left out Yorkies! I have a yorkie and it has the biggest heart. I wouldn't change anything about him. Some may be a little hyper if they are around other dogs, but mine is very laid back. A very good alert dog and doesn't bark profusely. It's hair is easy to groom and he loves everyone, even kids. Though he gets a little nervous around kids, but that's because I don't have any of my own. He gets jealous when I talk to my house guests and not talk to him like he is a part of the conversation. Easy to train, but can be hard headed at times. I taught him to sit with a 5 minute practice for 3 days straight. Yorkies are also very beautiful!

  • Japanese Chin
    02/28/2013 12:04pm

    I'm owned by four Japanese Chins. While they are very engaging pupsters, most folks who are fans of the breed do not recommend them for families with small children (undoubtedly I'll now hear "but we have kids and Chins ...).

    Chins can be temperamental; I get put into the dog house by my Chinsters more often than I have to discipline them :-) and it takes people who can easily guage a dog's mood to keep them happy.

    Their fur is of varying lengths, density and wave, so it's hard to know how much of a shedder a Chin is until reaches adulthood. I have one - Yoshi - whose hair is more like a Pekingese (Chins are said to be an ancient cross between a Pekingese and Spaniel) - very dense and long. He leaves furballs in his wake if I don't brush him often. Anjin's hair is more wiry, thinner and wavy. Hanshi has thin, sparse hair that is like teflon - he never has butt clingers or matts, like the others and sheds very little. They are all very prone to getting matts behind their ears.

    Chins have hereditary faults: luxating patella, heart problems; the characteristic of having an underbite causes teeth issues. I have to be diligent about brushing Anjin's teeth or she gets a tartar build up. Because of her underbite she has issues with eating as well. Chins can have issues with a buildup of tears under their eyes, causing grit to accumulate and infection if you aren't diligent about keeping that area clean.

    If anyone considers bringing a Chin into their family, please check the rescues before going with a breeder. JCCARE and LuvAChin are the main rescues for the breed, but also check PetFinder. I so adore Chins that I would rather see the rescues cleared out of their number before any more Chins are added to the population by breeding.

  • Chins
    02/28/2013 04:43pm

    Absolutely agree with Terri Weller-Arnold - very good info. I had left a previous post about how much we adore our Chin (we only have one, along with our Mini-Poodle - but my husband always says he wishes we could have a Chin ranch XD) However I'd have to agree that I wouldn't think they would be the best choice for a family with kids, especially very young ones. Chins are definitely characters! I have to say that although Gaz is our first, she likely won't be our last. But indeed, for anyone thinking about being owned by one all the points made by Terri should be carefully considered. Viva Chins!! 8D

  • Chins
    03/05/2013 01:19pm

    I agree with what has been written here about chins.....I would like to put my two cents worth in to just say how much I adore the chins I have.... one purebred and one 3/4 chin 1/4 shih tzu.
    They are definatly a breed worth mention.

  • Bostons
    03/06/2013 05:02pm

    headstrong but easy to train if you are tough enough to handle them. great little dogs, we are on our 2nd. loves to play and tolerates and is tolerated by our cats. Bostons are very acive as puppies but mellow when they mature. very low maintenace but be careful of their bug eyes as they can easily be injured playing rough (which our puppy love-playing rough not eye boo boos.

  • Tibetan Spaniel
    03/08/2013 09:03am

    A year ago we were fortunate to adopt a Tibetan Spaniel. Having never heard of the breed, we didn't know what to expect, but when Wesley jumped on my husband's lap, we were hooked. Now we're convinced. If we knew then what we know now, there might not have been Dobermans, Tibetan Terriers, Dachsunds, and assorted rescues through the years.

    Our vet had no idea what the Tibetan Spaniel was when we brought him in, but he too is hooked. We call Wesley our pussy cat dog. He feels like a cat, takes no grooming except for combing, spends as much time as he can on someone's lap,is as smart as any dog we've ever been privileged to live with, and has lit up our lives like no other.

    I have mixed feelings about too much popularity for the breed, fearing what too much breeding may lead to, but the Tibetan Spaniel is the perfect small dog in a perfect package.

  • Peke
    03/20/2013 10:51am

    I have my second Peke and I couldn't be more pleased with this breed.I would highly recommend this breed.

  • Tibetan Spaniel
    03/20/2013 11:49am

    This weekend we traveled 340 miles to "rescue or adopt" our second Tibetan Spaniel. My husband mentioned a second one that we thought was available a week after we adopted Wesley and, sure enough, Adopt a Pet contacted me on the same day about two that were available. Willie (Sir William) is all blonde and is as much of a love as Wesley.

    Aside from a bit of jockeying for position with Mikey Willie has fit in to our zoo and has added another piece of fun to our lives. We know that Willie is a Tibetan Spaniel because he came from a breeder and now we think Wesley may be a cross between a Tibbie and a King Charles Cavalier. Believe it or not, the mix even has a name--they call them Tibaliers. Whatever. We love them all.

  • Shih Tzu
    03/20/2013 03:25pm

    This is the only breed of dog I would ever own. They are very smart, practically train themselves, and no shedding. Sweetest, friendliest dog I have ever owned.

  • =[
    03/24/2013 06:23pm

    This list seems wrong to me. Yes some of these breeds can be yappy and defensve at times, but what they fail to tell you is once you earn their trust there is nothing in the world like it. I currently have a female chihuahua and yes she tends to get a little irritable at new guests but she always warms up to them. It's just her way of being careful she doesn't know them. In her eyes they are a threat me my fiance and I. To me she is the sweetest lil dog. She loves affection never leaves my side. If I'm sick she's my nurse. She lights up at the sound of my voice and when I come home she acts like she hasn't seem me in years. She loves belly rubs and thinks she's a bigger dog half the time. She sleeps and plays with my cats and our other dog which is a mut. Which also ins't a bad way to go. I guess what I'm saying is people need to worry less about the breed and more about how and why they came into your life. I wouldn't trade any of my pets for anythng. Their personalities and love fill my world and that's good enough for me. Not all dogs of the same breed act the same way. They are a reflection of how they are treated and brought up.

  • Skye Terriers NOT small
    03/30/2013 11:24pm

    The breed standard for the Skye says they can range between 35 - 45 pounds. That is NOT a small dog - it is medium sized dog.

  • Dachsund
    04/02/2013 02:12pm

    Dachshunds are also very playful and affectionate with their owners. They enjoy burrowing so tend to be fond of sleeping with their owners. This is good during cold winters, not so good during hot summers. Doxies can be cat chasers but if raised around cats and taught the "leave it" command, you can curtail that. My doxie thinks my cat is his best friend and the feeling is mutual.

    Also, and not to discourage people from the awesomeness that is Dachshund, but they CAN be hard to house break.

  • Toy Poodle or Yorkie
    04/09/2013 02:27pm

    Toy Poodles and Yorkie's are more popular then some of the breeds listed. I had a Toy Poodle for 18 years and he was smart, loyal and got along well with everyone and everything including cats. They also don't shed and are very easy to train. I currently have a MORKIE (Maltese and Yorkie)She is the definition of small dog. Strong personality, loving, protective and weighs 3.5 lbs and is full grown.

  • My Pom Sampson
    04/19/2013 04:02pm

    I love my Pom. at first he did shed quite a bit but only during a certain time of year which is typically the fall. I simply take him to Petsmart to get groomed and they have a special shampoo and grooming they do that takes care of that. We started this a couple years ago and his shedding is now at a minimum.

  • My Pom Sampson pt2
    04/19/2013 04:04pm

    P:S And yes he is a loud one and has a big mouth at times lol

  • Seriously?
    04/28/2013 08:39pm

    Who did this review? I agree with many of the others, there were definitely some wrong things in the list. Toy poodles should probably be the top of the list. I'm a toy poodle breeder and I was offered $3500.00 for one of my puppies. Poodles are also a great choice for families as long as children are properly disciplined on how to be around small animals. Another breed I would suggest to everyone is a cross between the pomeranian & pekingness called a peek a pom, they're wonderfully gentle, the cross gentles down the traits in both breeds and they're extremely intelligent. Poodles though, are still top of the pack on that one, with one exception, a border collie. Send this article writer back to school.

  • Mini Dachshund owner of 2
    05/08/2013 02:47pm

    I was a groomer for petsmart in California, and a dog trainer for the AKC in Wisconsin. I have known all breeds closely, and come to realize that having a dachshund is like having a cool big dog, in a tiny body. They are super loving, smooth coat ones have the least maintenance, and are smart enough to learn easily. They will do anything for cheese. Mine get along with kids of all ages. One of mine was about 12 years old before ever dealing with kids. He did perfect. The other one was two, same case. They get along with cats, new and old, strangers, even our doves! They can be socialized however you like, as long as they are pure breeds. I do have one that is 1 quarter Chihuahua, and there is definitely a difference. Potty training issues, territorial, and slower to warm up to strangers. He barks, but the others don't until he gets them going. I can't say enough good things about the breed. I have suggested them to family and friends, and anyone who followed along, was enormously pleased with the results!

  • Boston Terrier
    05/09/2013 09:08pm

    Boston Terriers are the best! We have 4 girls right now. We have had a total of 8 females. We do not breed them,we just love them. They are great with kids and they have the best personalities!

  • How about Papillons?
    05/11/2013 05:15pm

    I have a Papillon and find him to be the smartest dog I've ever owned. He's very focused on what I'm doing so has been exceptionally easy to train. He has a wonderful personality, can be protective of me, but listens when I tell him not to bark. He loves to run outdoors, but is not one to stay out for long periods of time...would rather be sitting watching tv. No kidding, he watches tv so he can see the dogs and cats. Even knows some of the jingles. When he hears them he runs into the tv room to watch. I love him and find him to be a wonderful companion....he's weighs 8 pounds so he's definitely in the small dog category. Does anyone know if they are becoming more popular as a choice of pet?

  • Bichon/poodle
    05/16/2013 04:57pm

    All I can say is precious! Punkie is his name and he's full of energy. He's all of 7lbs and he's wonderful. Great with the kids and other pets. I got him at 5 months and he's perfect like the kids. He wears outfits and takes professional pictures with my kids. He is the great protector until the vistors come in the house then he's the great cream puff...The Bichon was a great choice when puppy shopping

  • 05/20/2013 03:06pm

    I had four healthy, loveable, playful "chihuahuas. The most cruel thing is when I complied with a law that the county of Los Angeles passed, that said I had to have my little dog friends spaded and nuttered if I wanted to have them or they would fine me and take them away from me. So I complied wth the new law. Three days after I HAD THEM MUTILATED one of them died (he was only three years old), another one became a hatefull little recluse, if you tried to pet her, she would try to bite you and run off and hide. All she wanted to do, is sleep and eat everything she could get her mouth on. Other two two dogs became sickly, they wouldn't play any more and came doun with a breathing problem. I will take care of my little friends until they die and then no more dogs for me. I am 90 years old and find it to up setting to loose a little friend like this. I have had pets all my life and allways took care of them. A lot of people say "so what" they are only a dog, just go get another one at the dog pound. To me they are family.

  • To Ed Ferrett
    05/20/2013 03:33pm

    I am terribly sorry that this happened to you. I am a strong spay/neuter advocate; all the pets I have ever owned including the two my husband and I have now have been spayed. I've never, ever had any who experienced any terrible side effects such as you are describing. I'm not saying it couldn't happen, I've just never heard of such a thing! It makes me wonder about the vet/clinic who performed the surgeries, or if your dogs suffered some other trauma besides the surgeries. At any rate, as I said, it makes me very sad that you had to go through such an awful thing. I know it's true that there are some people who may say "it's just a dog" but I think I can safely say that anyone posting here wouldn't feel that way at all. It brings me to tears even to THINK of losing one of our girls! In my opinion, a person who cannot appreciate the unconditional love that a pet offers and who looks on dogs - or any animal - with callous disregard is seriously lacking something personality-wise and isn't a person I would want to have anything to do with. Again, my sincere sympathy - never mind what uncaring people might say - there are plenty of us who completely understand what it means to consider pets a part of the family.

  • 1+ is the Toy Poodle
    05/22/2013 02:38pm

    Smarter then the rest to boot.

  • 08/27/2013 03:56pm

    What about the yorkie, they're so affectionate and loyal. My little guy is so much fun.

  • Idiot!
    10/20/2013 01:18pm

    @Ken Sullivan Oh, Shut up, Stupid! If we want to buy a dog from a pet store, Get one from someone else, or breed them, THEN LET US DO IT! IT'S NOT HURTING ANYONE! SO SHUT UP!

  • Peke's are my pick!
    10/30/2013 01:22pm

    I am a life long Pekingese lover and so happy to see them included here. They are wonderful little dogs (I currently own three)! They are loyal, not to yappy and as far as I'm concerned the most beautiful little dogs around. They can be stubborn but you just have to show them who's boss from the beginning! I think the breed is under appreciated.

  • Peke's are my pick!
    10/30/2013 01:24pm

    I am a life long Pekingese lover and so happy to see them included here. They are wonderful little dogs (I currently own three)! They are loyal, not to yappy and as far as I'm concerned the most beautiful little dogs around. They can be stubborn but you just have to show them who's boss from the beginning! I think the breed is under appreciated.

  • IMHO
    11/06/2013 01:30pm

    Ken Sullivan, thanks for the reality check! BeJeebus!...SO MANY articles today written by hacks who apparently just spew "facts"(verifiable data) without the slightest concern for authenticity; just to get that click?!?
    I mean seriously, has it ever been easier to affirm the validity than now?!
    Thanks so much for helping to eradicate evil breeding practices. Many have already pointed out the inconsistencies of this article, but I must mention the Skye Terrier. These are fairly large animals, that just happen to be on the short-legged side. I have never seen one in person in my entire life, but have admired them and the Glen of Immal Terrier since their inception to the WKC. RARE & $$$ breeds, for sure! I've had a few Pembrokes over the years but have moved to a smaller, more lap-centered breed. I now have two female Chi-Chi's (Just turned eight) and they are essentially furry hedonists. In these colder months they head straight for my bed after doing their "chores" for the morning! Super-affectionate pooches IF you TRAIN THEM PROPERLY! They are headstrong little creatures and some are amazingly intelligent! BIG CONCERN$ = Patella Luxation (Floating kneecap), Hip Dysplasia (exacerbated by PL & both chronically painful), and collapsing trachea. Be diligent with your sources!!!

  • Powder Puff Chinese Crest
    03/13/2014 07:29pm

    We just adopted an 8 yr old male Powder Puff Chinese Crested from the Humane Society. Fonzie is a 6 lb bundle of love. He's very much a lap dog and a one-person dog. He loves walks when it is warm out and has times of play, running the hallway for exercise. He was paper trained but we are getting him trained to go outdoors. He is very smart and doesn't shed. I will be taking him to the groomer soon. He is a real joy and this breed would make a good pet for anyone.

 
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