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CPR for Dogs

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Dogs

 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, or CPR, is a combination of chest compression and artificial respiration. It is normally used when you cannot feel or hear the dog’s heart beat. Once the dog stops breathing the heart will go into cardiac arrest and cease beating.

 

Before performing this procedure please keep in mind that Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is hazardous and can cause physical complications or fatal damage if performed on a healthy dog. It should only be performed when necessary.

 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for puppies/ dogs less than 30 pounds (14 kg):

 

  1. Lay the dog on a flat surface with his/her right side against the surface.
  2. Cup your palms and hold the dog with one palm on either side above the heart region. (You can also place your thumb on one side of his chest and keep the fingers on the other side.)
  3. Compress the chest for one inch to one-quarter or one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 100 compressions in a minute.
  4. If only one person is available, breathe into the dog’s nose once for every five compressions that are done. If two persons are available, give artificial respiration once every two or three compressions are done.
  5. Continue with the CPR and artificial respiration until the dog begins breathing on its own and the pulse becomes steady.

 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for medium/large dogs weighing more than 30 lb (14 kg):

 

  1. Lay the dog on a flat surface with his/her right side against the surface. (You will need to stand towards the dog’s back.)
  2. Put one of your palms on the dog’s rib cage, near the heart region, and put your other palm on top of it.
  3. Without bending both the elbows, press the rib cage in a downward motion.
  4. Compress the chest for one-quarter to one-third the width of the chest for a count of one and then let go for a count of one. Carry on at a rate of 80 compressions per minute.
  5. Close the muzzle with your hand before beginning artificial respiration. If only one person is available, breathe into the dog’s nose once for every five compressions that are done. If two persons are available, give artificial respiration once for every two compressions are done.
  6. Continue performing CPR until the dog begins to breathe and has a steady pulse.
  7. If the dog does not show any signs of improvement after 10 minutes of CPR, you can stop as it has not proven successful.

 

 

Comments  2

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  • THANK-YOU!
    09/08/2016 04:32am

    Thank-you for this information. It is very important to know this.

    I will FaceBook this link to spread your word. Thank-you!

    PS: Though I gotta tell you....#7 saddens me. Js.....
    ""If the dog does not show any signs of improvement after 10 minutes of CPR, you can stop as it has not proven successful."" :'(

  • Thank you
    12/19/2016 06:21am

    After my four year old, happy, healthy, beautiful German Shepherd had a extremely minor surgery, the vet gave him pain medicine. Only after he overdosed on one round of medicine no more than 12 hours after getting the pills, did we find out that the vet didn't bother to check to make sure the dosage was too high and how to take it was extremely wrong. I learned dog CPR a long time ago after my oldest dog had a seizure, it scared me, so I wanted to be prepared if anything happened.

    I couldn't save my fur baby, Harry, yesterday, but I tried like hell. This is something that everyone who has a dog and loves them should learn.



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