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Degenerative Skin Disorder (Necrolytic Dermatitis) in Dogs

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Treatment

 

Your veterinarian will treat the underlying disease process if possible, and will prescribe the appropriate medicine to treat the dog's symptoms. Most dogs can be treated on an outpatient basis, but in some cases, hospitalized care will be necessary. Outright liver failure should be treated with supportive care.

 

Dogs with glucagon-secreting tumors can be cured with surgery, but the tumors will typically spread quickly, before surgical intervention can reverse their progress. Most of these cases are associated with chronic, irreversible liver disease.

 

Living and Management

 

Unfortunately, most dogswith this disease will also have a severe internal disease with a poor prognosis. A specially-formulated prescription shampoo can help to remove the crusts and may make your dog feel more comfortable.

 

 

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