Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Puppy Strangles in Dogs

ADVERTISEMENT

Juvenile Cellulitis in Dogs

 

Puppy strangles, or juvenile cellulitis, is a nodular and pustular skin disorder that affects puppies. It usually occurs between the ages of three weeks and four months, and is rarely seen in adult dogs. The face, pinnae (outer part of the ear), and salivary lymph nodes are the most common sites to be affected. The cause of this condition is unknown, but there are breeds that have been shown to be predisposed to it, including golden retrievers, dachshunds, and Gordon setters.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

  • Acutely (sudden and severe) swollen face – especially the eyelids, lips, and muzzle
  • Salivary gland lymphadenopathy: a disease process affecting a lymph node or multiple lymph nodes
  • Marked pustular and oozing skin disease, which frequently fistulates (develops into a hollow passage); develops within 24–48 hours
  • Pustular ear infection
  • Lesions often become crusted
  • Affected skin is usually tender
  • Lethargy in 50 percent of cases
  • Loss of appetite, fever, and presence of sterile suppurative arthritis in 25 percent of cases (acute inflammation of membranes, with leaking into a joint, due to bacterial infection)
  • Sterile pustular nodes (rare) over the trunk, reproductive organs, or on the area around the anus; lesions may appear as fluctuating nodules under the skin with fistulation

 

Causes

 

  • Cause and pathogenesis (origination) is unknown (idiopathic)
  • Immune dysfunction with an inheritable cause is suspected

 

Diagnosis

 

Your veterinarian will conduct a skin biopsy (tissue sample) to determine what is causing the lesions.

 

 

Treatment

 

If your puppy is diagnosed with puppy strangles, early and aggressive therapy will be required to avoid severe scarring. Corticosteroids are the treatment of choice. Your veterinarian may prescribe a topical (external) ointment to soothe and ease the pain, and as an adjunct to corticosteroid medication. In rare resistant cases, chemotherapy may be required. Adult dogs with panniculitis (inflammation under the skin) may require longer therapy. Antibiotics may be also prescribed if there is evidence of a secondary bacterial infection.

 

Living and Management

 

Most cases do not recur, but scarring may be a permanent problem, especially around the eyes.

 

 

Related Articles

Diseases of the Skin on the Nose in Dogs

Many diseases affect the skin on the noses of dogs. This includes bacterial or fungal infections of the skin, or mites. These diseases may affect...

READ MORE
Skin and Toe Cancer (Melanocytic) in Dogs

Melanocytic tumors are benign or cancerous growths, arising from melanocytes (pigment-producing skin cells) and melanoblasts (melanin-producing...

READ MORE
Skin Reactions to Drugs in Dogs

Cutaneous drug eruptions cover a spectrum of diseases and clinical signs. They can vary markedly in clinical appearance and pathophysiology –...

READ MORE
Wart Virus in Dogs

The term papillomatosis is used to describe a benign tumor on the surface of the skin. A virus, known as the papillomavirus, causes the growth....

READ MORE
MORE FROM PETMD.COM