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Dislocated Eye Lens in Dogs

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Treatment

 

If your dog still has the potential for at least partial vision, the eyes may be best treated by removing the lens using a procedure called intraocular lens prosthesis. Occasionally, topical miotic (constriction of the pupil of the eye) therapy can keep a posteriorly luxated lens behind the pupil and the need for surgery can be prolonged.

 

Irreversibly blind eyes can be treated by evisceration (removal of the internal material from the eye), or by enucleation with intrascleral prosthesis — removal and subsequent replacement of the eye with an artificial eye. If the condition is secondary to cancer, enucleation is the best choice for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

 

Living and Management

 

After treatment, your dogshould be re-examined immediately after the first 24 hours and every three months thereafter. Your doctor may want to refer you to an opthalmological veterinarian for evaluation, as intracapsular lens extraction — removal of the entire lens and its capsule — is also indicated for posterior luxations in order to decrease the chance for retinal detachment and chronic uveitis. A specialist can also examine for secondary glaucoma and retinal detachment. Unfortunately, there is a possibility that the lens luxation may affect both eyes if it hasn't already.

 

 

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