Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Salmonella Infection in Dogs

Salmonellosis in Dogs

 

Salmonellosis is an infection found in dogs caused by the Salmonella bacteria. It often leads to disorders, including gastroenteritis, spontaneous abortions, and septicemia. This bacterial disease is also zoonotic, meaning it can be transmitted to humans.

 

Salmonellosis affects both dogs cats. If you would like to learn how this disease affects cats, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

The severity of the disease will often determine the signs and symptoms that are overtly present in the dog. Symptoms commonly seen in dogs with salmonellosis include:

 

 

Chronic forms of salmonellosis may exhibit some of these same symptoms; however, they will be more severe. These include symptoms:

 

  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of blood
  • Non-intestinal infections
  • Diarrhea that comes and goes with no logical explanation, which may last up to three or four weeks, or longer

 

Causes

 

There are more than 2,000 different types of Salmonella, a Gram-negative enterobacteria. Typically, a host animal carrying the disease will have two or more different microorganisms or types of Salmonellae bacteria that cause this disease.

 

Risk factors include the dog's age, with younger and older animals most at risk due to their underdeveloped and/or compromised immune systems. Similarly, dogs with weak immune systems or immature gastrointestinal tracts are at risk.

 

Dogs receiving antibiotic therapy are also at risk because the healthy bacteria that line the digestive tract (or florae), may become imbalanced, increasing the risk of salmonellosis.

 

Diagnosis

 

To confirm a diagnosis of salmonellosis, your veterinarian will examine your dog for different physical and pathological findings.

 

Unfortunately, a dog infected with the bacteria will typically not show any clinical symptoms. However, some dogs do have gastroenteritis, a disease affecting the gastrointestinal system that presents with an inability to eat, general poor health and fatigue, depression, and a chronic fever that may stay as high as 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

 

Other diagnostic features include:

 

 

Your veterinarian may want to also rule out other conditions that can result in similar symptoms, including parasites, dietary-induced stress (including allergy or food intolerances), drug or toxin-induced stresses, and diseases like viral gastroenteritis or bacterial gastroenteritis caused by E. Coli or other common bacteria.

 

Diagnostic procedures typically involve collecting urine and fecal samples for laboratory analysis. Your veterinarian may also find it helpful to conduct blood cultures.

 

Treatment

 

Outpatient treatment is often possible in uncomplicated cases. However, if a dog has sepsis, a blood infection, or a severe case of salmonellosis, inpatient care may be necessary, especially for puppies that have developed severe dehydration as a result of the infection.

 

Treatment may include rehydrating your dog, helping it to overcome severe weight and fluid loss, and replacing lost electrolytes. In severe cases of salmonellosis, plasma or blood transfusions may be necessary to help replace fluids and serum albumin.

 

They are a few antimicrobials available to your veterinarian that may be used for treating dogs with salmonellosis. Glucocorticoids, a form of adrenal or steroid hormone, may also help to prevent shock in dogs with severe salmonellosis.

 

Living and Management

 

Your veterinarian may order a 48-hour food restriction as part of your pet's care. In some cases, dog owners need to be separated from their pets during the acute stage of the disease because of the zoonosis of salmonellosis. Strict attention to hygiene is essential for preventing further spread of disease, which is often shed in the infected dog's stool.

 

It is important to provide your dog a nutritionally-balanced diet. Avoid giving your dog raw or undercooked meat, as this is a risk factor for salmonellosis. If possible, avoid animal pounds and shelters, as overcrowding may also promote the spread of disease.

 

 

Related Articles

Intestinal Protein Loss in Dogs
Protein losing enteropathy is one type of condition that affects a dog's ability...
READ MORE
Acute Vomiting in Dogs
It is not uncommon for dogs and cats to vomit from time to time. Learn how to treat...
READ MORE
Canine Coronavirus Infection in Dogs
A canine coronavirus infection (CCV) is a highly contagious intestinal disease that...
READ MORE

Do you have an emergency kit for your pet(s)?

  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search dog Articles

 

Latest In Dog Nutrition

Pet Food Ingredients that Promote Longer Life
Pet foods, in order to promote a healthy long life, must be balanced and complete...
READ MORE
The Role of Exercise in Pet Weight Loss
Exercise is beneficial for our pets in many ways, including weight loss, and here's...
READ MORE
How Obesity May Shorten Your Pet's Lifespan
Obesity is a nationwide epidemic for our pets. Unfortunately, being obese can shorten...
READ MORE
Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM