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Nose Cancer (Adenocarcinoma) in Dogs

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Nasal Adenocarcinoma in Dogs

 

Nose cancer (or nasal adenocarcinoma) occurs when too many cells in the animal's nasal and sinus passages come together. The disease progresses slowly and occurs both in dogs and cats. Studies have shown nose cancer is more common in larger animal breeds than in smaller ones, and it may be more common in males than females. Options exist when the disease is caught early and aggressively treated.

 

The condition or disease described in this medical article can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects cats, please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

 

Symptoms

 

  • Sneezing
  • Anorexia
  • Seizures
  • Nasal discharge
  • Facial deformity
  • Pain in the nose
  • Obstructive masses in the animal's nose

 

Causes

 

A pollutant-filled environment is a known cause of nose cancer in dogs.

 

Diagnosis 

 

Veterinarians may utilize a variety of tools to detect nose cancer. A microscopic camera placed in the nose (rhinoscopy) can be used to look into the nasal cavity, although it may not be effective if blood or masses are obstructing the view. A biopsy will be done for a definitive diagnosis. A diagnosis can also be made if bacterial cultures come back positive. Material from the lymph nodes are sometimes examined to see if the disease has spread (metastasized) into other parts of the animal's body.

 

 

Treatment

 

While surgery may be used to remove a tumor, it is not effective as a treatment option on its own. Radiation therapy (radiotherapy), when combined with surgery, has shown the best results in dogs. In some cases, chemotherapy is prescribed.

 

Living and Management

 

If the nose cancer is not treated, the median survival time is between three and five months. When radiotherapy is used, the survival rate percentages range from 20 to 49 percent for the first two years after the treatments. It is best to follow the prescribed treatment plan to ensure the best possible outcome for your pet.

 

Prevention

 

There is currently no way to prevent nose cancer.

 

 

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