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Bile Duct Cancer in Dogs




Surgery to remove the liver cancer is the treatment of choice. Up to 75 percent of the liver can be removed if the remaining liver tissue is normal. Chemotherapy is generally not indicated, as it has not been found to be a successful treatment in dogs. Even with successful surgery and little to no metastasis throughout the body, prognosis remains poor.


Living and Management

You will need to return to you veterinarian for follow-up exams every two months after the initial care. Your doctor will measure liver enzyme activity in the blood stream, and check the status of your dog's liver and organs using thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound.



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