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Bone Deformity and Dwarfism in Dogs

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Treatment

 

After establishing the diagnosis, your veterinarian may decide to correct the problem with surgery. However, results of such corrective surgery are usually not rewarding. Pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications are recommended for many affected patients as bone deformities can cause significant pain for these patients. Your dog's feelings of comfort and its projected life-span depend on the severity of the problem. If it is relatively minor, it is entirely possible for your dog to go on to live a relatively comfortable and healthy life.

 

Living and Management

 

The prognosis of this disease depends on the extent of problem. There is no definitive treatment option available for treating this disorder, and the outcome varies according to the severity of the disorder and which bones are affected. For some dogs, the bone dysplasia can be incapacitating, while for others, learning to compensate for the smaller limb size and reduction in mobility is successfully achieved.

 

Dogs that are affected with osteochondrodysplasia may be more prone to arthritic developments. This is something to be aware of as your dog ages. Another precaution to keep in mind is the risk of obesity that is a common side effect of this disorder. Make sure that you stay to a healthy diet and be observant of your dog's weight and physical health. If your veterinarian does recommend pain medications, be sure to use them with caution and with full instruction from your veterinarian. One of the most preventable accidents with pets is an overdose of medication.

 

As these disorders are genetically acquired, breeding is not recommended.

 

 

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