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Nutrition Center -

The High-Stakes Life of an ER Vet: A First-Hand Account

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By Geoff Williams Gunshot wounds. Victims of a hit-and-run. An emergency splenectomy. Dr. Jessica Brownfield has seen it all. And when it's over, if all goes well, Brownfield might get a hug from grateful family members—or...

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Related

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8 Ways to Calm Your Pet Naturally 10 Natural Methods for Controlling Fleas on Dogs Natural Flea and Tick Products 6 Ways to Go Natural With Your Pet Apple Cider Vinegar: A Natural Flea Preventative Are...

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Cleaning Messes

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Accidents are bound to happen in homes with animals. For urine stains on carpeting, Swayne recommends treating the stained area with baking soda and distilled white vinegar diluted with water. “We use vinegar in our clients’...

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Neutralizing Odors

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If your pet’s odor is bugging you, distilled white vinegar can make the smell go away. Maids by Trade, a pet-friendly Portland, Oregon-based cleaning service, recommends spraying a thin layer of vinegar over the carpet and letting it evaporate,...

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Not a Cure-All

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For all the good it does, vinegar is not a cure-all. A professional examination may be necessary if, for example, your dog’s skin sore does not improve after a couple of days of using a vinegar treatment. “If the problem is...

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Treating Hot Spots

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Organic apple cider vinegar can be used to treat hot spots, Morgan says. Unlike white distilled vinegar, unfiltered organic apple cider vinegar contains “mother,” strands of proteins, enzymes, and friendly bacteria that make the...

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Relieving Urinary Tract Infections

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Vinegar can help dogs and cats that suffer from urinary tract infections. However, before trying a vinegar remedy, you will first need to find out what the pH is in your pet’s urine, Morgan says. “If the pH is above 7, then...

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Cleaning Ears

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Ear infections are a common problem for dogs, especially those with floppy ears. You can clean your pet’s ears with a 50/50 mixture of water and vinegar, Morgan says. Put the solution on a cotton ball and wipe the inside of your dog’s...

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Keeping Fleas and Ticks Away

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Vinegar repels fleas and ticks, says Morgan, who has used vinegar mixed with a popular skin treatment for humans on her horses. To make your own flea and tick repellent, mix one part vinegar with one part water and spray it on your pet’s...

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Aiding Digestion

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Pets on grain-based diets can have trouble digesting their food, resulting in higher-than-healthy levels of pH, says Morgan. “If you add vinegar to the food, they’ll digest it better and lower the pH, which allows good bacteria...

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Vinegar – It’s Not Just for the Kitchen

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By Lynne Miller You know that bottle of vinegar in your cupboard? It’s not just for cooking. Dog and cat owners are using this inexpensive pantry staple in a variety of ways. Vinegar can be safely used for treating many common...

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7 Vinegar Uses for Pet Owners

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You know that bottle of vinegar in your cupboard? It’s not just for cooking. Dog and cat owners are using this inexpensive pantry staple in a variety of ways. Learn more.

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Review

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Remember, you can take the pain out of your pet’s visits to the vet by being prepared, staying calm and getting him used to the experience with proper training. Don’t be afraid to speak with your veterinarian if you’re concerned...

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Keep Practicing at Home

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Continue handling your pet as the vet would periodically at home and reward him for his good behavior. Gently poke and prod monthly to re-assess his tolerance and general health. “If all of a sudden he gets weird about his ears being touched,...

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Give Your Pet Some Down Time

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Once you are home, give your pet some down time, Bennett suggests. He is likely tired out from the adventure of visiting the doctor. Just keep an eye on him for any reaction to a vaccination or other medication that was receive, or any unusual...

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Reward Good Behavior Throughout the Visit

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Be sure to reward good behavior throughout the visit, Bennett says. Reward your pet in the waiting room, in the exam room, as the doctor handles him — or when he is done handling him, if he is too nervous for treats — and when you...

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Consider Relaxation Aids

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If your animal is nervous by nature despite your best efforts to keep him calm, you can try using pheromones that have a calming effect, Bright says. Such substances seem to work well for cats and can be purchased at a pet supply store and sprayed...

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Don’t Force or Hold Animals Down

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Bright says the biggest mistake she sees is when a pet parent and staff try to muscle the animal through an appointment. “You see a cat being held down by four people with cat gloves, or muzzling a dog, and five people are holding him...

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Ask Vets to Try a Side Approach

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Once you get in the exam room, don’t let staff crowd your animal. “People approaching from the front with two hands coming at the animal and staring in its eyes is scary,” Bright says. “When someone approaches from the...

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Wait Outside or In the Car

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If your pet remains highly anxious, simply wait outside or in your car, Bennett suggests. Just go in and tell the staff you are there. They can signal to you or call you when the doctor is ready. That goes for scaredy-cats and other small animals...

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Inform Staff of High Anxiety

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If you offer your dog a high-value treat, such as string cheese, and he turns his nose up at it, that means his anxiety is particularly high. “If your dog won’t eat, then you know your dog is really stressed. Make sure to tell the...

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Keep Your Pet Busy

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Use training commands that you have practiced to get your dog to heel, sit or otherwise remain under control in the waiting room. Reward his good behavior with frequent treats. Reward him when he sits, looks at you, or in general, keeps his...

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Keep Your Dog Facing You

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Ensuring a little personal space is important for dogs, too. Keep yourself between your pup and other animals. Bennett advises that you avoid letting your dog make eye contact with another dog and put some physical distance between you, your...

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Maintain Space in the Waiting Room

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When you enter the waiting room with your cat in her carrier, don’t let other pet parents bring their dogs right up to her, Bright says. And be sure to keep a little space between your cat and all the other curious critters and people.

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Speak to Your Pet in a Calm Tone

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Talk to your pet calmly as you normally would as you enter your vet’s waiting room. Be on time and have all documents you need ready for the staff so you can quickly check in and sit quietly with your pet.

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