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Pus in the Urine in Cats

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Pyuria in Cats

 

Pyuria is a medical condition that can be associated with any pathologic process (infectious or noninfectious) that causes cellular injury or death, with tissue damage provoking oozing inflammation. Pyuria is characterized by evidence of increased white and red blood cells and protein in the urine. Large numbers of white blood cells in voided urine samples can indicate an active inflammation somewhere along the urogenital tract.

 

Symptoms

 

  • Local Effects of Inflammation
  • Redness of mucosal surfaces (e.g., redness of vaginal or prepuce mucous tissue)
  • Tissue swelling
  • Pustulent discharge
  • Pain (e.g., adverse response to touch, painful urination, frequency of urination)
  • Loss of function (e.g., excessive urination, painful urination, frequent urination, urinary incontinence)
  • Systemic Effects of Inflammation
  • Fever
  • Depression
  • Loss of appetite (anorexia)
  • Dehydration

 

Causes

 

  • Kidney
    • Inflammation of the renal area, branches, or recesses of the pelvis of the kidney, and pelvis, particularly due to local bacterial, fungal, or parasitic, infection
    • Kidney stones
    • Tumor
    • Trauma
    • Immune-mediated
  • Ureter
    • Ureteritis: inflammation of the ureter (e.g., bacterial)
    • Stones in the ureter
    • Tumor
  • Urinary Bladder
    • Cystitis: inflammation of the bladder (e.g., bacterial, fungal, or parasitic)
    • Urocystolith(s): stones in the bladder or kidney
    • Tumor
    • Trauma
    • Urethral obstruction
    • Drugs
  • Urethra
    • Urethritis: inflammation of the urethra (e.g., bacterial, fungal)
    • Urethrolith(s): stones in the urethra
    • Tumor
    • Trauma
    • Foreign body
  • Prostate
    • Prostatitis/abscess (e.g., bacterial or fungal)
    • Tumor
  • Penis/Prepuce
    • Inflammation of the glans penis and overlying prepuce (foreskin)
    • Tumor
    • Foreign body
  • Uterus
    • Accumulation of purulent material in the uterine cavity (e.g., bacterial)
  • Vagina
    • Vaginitis: inflammation of the vagina; bacterial, viral, or fungal
    • Tumor
    • Foreign body
    • Trauma
  • Risk Factors
    • Any disease process, diagnostic procedure, or therapy that alters normal urinary tract defenses and predisposes an animal to infection
    • Any disease process, dietary factor, or therapy that predisposes an animal to formation of metabolic stones

 

 

 

Diagnosis

 

Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam on your cat, including a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis. You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, including a background history of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have precipitated this condition. The history you provide may give your veterinarian clues as to which organs are being affected.

 

Urinalysis will be used to determine the cause of the symptoms, if possible, before using more invasive procedures. Your doctor may also do a microscopic examination of urinary sediment, prostatic fluid, urethral or vaginal discharges, or biopsy specimens, which will be obtained either by catheter, or by needle aspiration. A survey by abdominal x-ray and ultrasound imaging also may be used if your veterinarian has not been able to settle on a conclusive diagnosis.

 

 

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