Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Excess Alkali in the Blood in Cats

Metabolic Alkalosis in Cats

 

Metabolic alkalosis in cats occurs when higher than normal bicarbonate (HCO3) levels are found in the blood. Bicarbonate serves to maintain the delicate balance of acid and alkali in the blood, also known as the pH balance, which is chiefly maintained by the lungs and kidneys. Diseases affecting the kidney and gastrointestinal tract functions are usually involved in the disruption of the acid and alkali balance in the blood. Though it must be pointed out that metabolic alkalosis is a secondary phenomenon and some other underlying disease is usually responsible for this problem. Metabolic alkalosis can occur in cats of any breed, age or gender.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Symptoms are generally related to the underlying cause of the metabolic alkalosis. The general symptoms related to metabolic alkalosis include:

 

  • Weakness
  • Irregular heartbeats
  • Ileus (complete arrest of intestinal movements)
  • Muscle twitching
  • Dehydration
  • Seizures (rare)

 

Causes

 

  • Vomiting
  • Oral administration of alkali, like bicarbonate
  • Administration of drugs which increase urine outflow resulting in loss of more acid
  • Hypoalbuminemia (decreased level of albumin - a protein in the blood)
  • Diseases that affect secretion of bicarbonate through the kidneys, resulting in retention of more alkali than normally required

 

Diagnosis

 

After taking a complete history of your cat's health, including a time line of how and when the symptoms began, your veterinarian will perform a physical examination on your cat. The next step will be to perform laboratory testing to check the levels of acid and alkali in the different body fluids. A complete blood profile will be conducted, including a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis. Blood gas analysis is also very useful in the diagnosis of metabolic alkalosis. The laboratory testing usually provides sufficient information for your veterinarian to be able to confirm a diagnosis.

 

 

 

 

Related Articles

Septicemia and Bacteremia in Cats
Bacteremia and septicemia occur when the persistent presence of bacterial organisms...
READ MORE

Do you have a plan for your pet(s) in case of natural disaster or emergency evacuation?

  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search cat Articles

 

 

Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM