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Claw and Nail Disorders in Cats

Treatment

 

Treatment will be dependent upon the particular underlying medical condition that is causing the nail or nail bed condition. If the nail area is inflamed, surgical removal of the nail plate (the hard portion) may be necessary to encourage drainage of the underlying tissue. Antimicrobial soaks can also be effective for reducing inflammation and encouraging the healing process. If the condition is related to a bacteria or a fungus, topical treatments and/or ointments are often administered to the affected area.

 

Living and Management

 

In most cases, application of the topical treatment or ointment will clear up any nail issues. While there are typically not many serious complications that can arise from these disorders, it is important to observe your cat's recovery and to act promptly if healing does not progress in a positive direction.

 

Prevention

 

One way to protect your vat from suffering a nail injury or disorder is to avoid cutting too close to the nail bed (the quick) when trimming the nails. Nicks to the skin can occur, opening your cat to infection as it goes about its normal routine (i.e., using the litter box, exploring). It is essential to look closely at your cat's nails before cutting them, so that you can determine exactly where the quick of the nail is – that is, the part of the nail bed that overlays the tissue and blood vessels. You do not want cut into that part of the nail; only the free edge that extends past the nail bed should be trimmed. Researching the proper way to cut your cat's nails, paying close attention, and promptly cleansing the area when an inadvertent injury does occur will go a long way toward protecting your cat from a painful nail disorder or trauma.

 

 

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