Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy

or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Too Much Acid in the Body in Cats




The treatment of metabolic acidosis is usually twofold. It involves the correction of the disturbed acid-base balance as well as addressing any underlying diseases, such as diabetes and/or kidney failure. Your veterinarian will give suitable fluid therapy in order to correct the acid balance. If the acidosis is mild, your cat will be able to go home after a short treatment. However, in cases of severe or complicated acidosis, your cat may need to be hospitalized for few days until it has stabilized. Diagnosis of the underlying problem/disease causing the acidosis is crucial for preventing future episodes of metabolic acidosis.


Living and Management


After returning from the hospital, keep a close eye on your cat for few days. If your cat starts behaving in a depressed manner, or is breathing rapidly even while at rest, check with your veterinarian. This is especially important for cats dealing with some chronic health problems like diabetes, in which the next episode of metabolic acidosis may occur at any time.



Related Articles

Pneumonia (Aspiration) in Cats

Aspiration pneumonia is a condition in which a cat's lungs become inflamed due to the inhalation of foreign matter, from vomiting, or from the...

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Cats

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, nonirritating gas produced by the inefficient combustion of carbon fuels. It is potentially toxic for...

Poisoning by Petroleum Products in Cats

When a cat is exposed to refined petroleum oil products, or ingests products of this type, it can result in a severe and disease-like physical...

Mid-Chest Inflammation in Dogs

An inflammation of the mid-chest area is usually caused by a bacterial infection or a fungus. It’s rare in dogs, but in severe cases it may be...