Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy



or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

Pet Family

PetMD Seal

Snail, Slug Bait Poisoning in Cats

Metaldehyde Poisoning in Cats

 

Slug and snail baits as well as some solid fuel for camp stoves all contain metaldehyde, which is extremely poisonous to cats, primarily affecting their nervous system. This type of poisoning is often seen in coastal and low-lying areas, where use of slug and snail bait is customary. And even though metaldehyde poisoning can be seen in both dogs and cats, it is more common in dogs.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

 

Causes

 

Metaldehyde ingestion.

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. The questions may specifically pertain to exposure to slug and snail baits or other sources of metaldehyde. He or she will then conduct a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile, urinalysis, and complete blood count (CBC) -- the results of which may be varied. A definitive diagnosis is typically made by verifying the presence of metaldehyde in bodily fluids (e.g., vomitus, stomach contents, and urine).

 


Treatment

 

A cat suffering from metaldehyde poisoning is the type of emergency which will need immediate hospitalization and treatment. Unfortunately, there is no antidote available. The only course of treatment is to eliminate the metaldehyde from the cat's body. Your veterinarian will pump the cat's stomach and, if it is not convulsing, give activated charcoal to absorb the poison in the stomach and intestines. The cat will be restrained to prevent injury. Fluids are also often necessary to rehydrate the cat.

 

Living and Management

 

It is important to not feed a cat that is convulsing or vomiting. Overall prognosis ultimately depends on the amount of metaldehyde ingested, time to treatment, and quality of care provided. If left untreated, however, a cat may die within few hours of ingestion. Watch your cat for vomiting and other symptoms, and call your veterinarian immediately.

 

 

Related Articles

Insecticide Toxicity in Cats
Organophosphate and Carbamate Toxicity   Areas that are...
READ MORE
Mushroom, Mold, Yeast Poisoning in Cats
The term “mycotoxicosis” is used to denote poisoning by food products contaminated...
READ MORE
Zinc Phosphide Poisoning in Cats
Poisoning by pesticides and rodenticides is one of the most common household dangers...
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search cat Articles

 

 

PETMD POLL

When did your dog/cat last have a routine vet checkup?

Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM