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Abnormal Passageway Between the Mouth and Nasal Cavity in Cats

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Oronasal Fistula in Cats

 

A fistula is characterized as an abnormal passageway between two openings, hollow organs, or cavities. They occur as a result of injury, infection, or disease. A communicating, vertical passageway between the mouth and nasal cavity is called an oronasal fistula. Oronasal fistulas are rare in cats, but they do occur.

 

These types of fistulas are caused by the diseased condition of any tooth in the upper jaw. The most common location for an oronasal fistula is where the root of the fourth premolar on the upper jaw enters the palate. This condition will need to be surgically corrected to prevent food and water from passing from the mouth into the nasal cavity. If this should occur, it will cause irritation of the nose, runny nose, inflammation of the sinuses, infection, and possibly pneumonia.

 

The condition or disease described in this medical article can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects dogs please visit this page in the PetMD health library.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Symptoms of an oronasal fistula include a chronically runny nose, with or without bleeding, and persistent sneezing.

 

Causes

 

  • Trauma
  • Bite wounds
  • Oral cancer
  • Electrical shock
  • Periodontal disease
  • Traumatic tooth extraction
  • Mandibular canines (the fang-like teeth) positioned toward the tongue
  • Upper jaw overbites, which causes the canine teeth in the bottom jaw to pierce the hard palate (roof of the mouth)

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have precipitated/preceded this condition. Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical and oral exam using a periodontal probe to investigate the suspected oronasal fistula.

A complete blood profile will be conducted, including a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, a urinalysis, and an electrolyte panel. The blood-work should be done before anesthetizing the cat for surgical correction of the oronasal fistula.

 

 

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