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Droopy Eye in Cats




Horner’s syndrome itself doesn’t require any specific treatment, though your cat will need to be treated for the underlying causes leading to the symptoms of Horner’s syndrome. The medication and treatment protocol will depend on the underlying cause. If bite wound or ear infection is present, treatment is required for complete recovery, and eye medication can be prescribed to relieve the clinical signs.

Image: mtr via Shutterstock


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