Hi stranger! Signing up for MypetMD is easy, free and puts the most relevant content at your fingertips.

Get Instant Access To

  • 24/7 alerts for pet-related recalls

  • Your own library of articles, blogs, and favorite pet names

  • Tools designed to keep your pets happy and healthy


or Connect with Facebook

By joining petMD, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

PetMD Seal

Eye Inflammation (Conjunctivitis) in Cats

Conjunctivitis in Cats

 

Conjunctivitis refers to the inflammation of the moist tissues in a cat's eye, which are the portions of the eye located near the globe and up to the edge of the cornea -- the front part of the eye. It can cause the cat's eye to discharge fluid and other uncomfortable symptoms for the animal. Treatment, ultimately, is based on the underlying cause of the condition.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

There are several common symptoms of this disease, including:

 

  • Persistent squinting
  • Regular and excessive blinking
  • Redness of the eye tissue
  • Eye discharge
  • Fluid build up in the eye
  • Upper respiratory infection

 

Causes

 

There are several viruses that can cause conjunctivitis, one of the most common being the herpes virus. Cats that are regularly exposed to other cats with viral infections are more prone to develop the disease. There are also bacterial causes, one of which is commonly referred to as "dry eye.” In addition, allergies can cause the eyes to react as an external response to the allergen, or it may be as simple as a foreign particle lodging in the eye. Finally, purebred cats are more likely to develop the disease than other cats.

 

Diagnosis

 

The veterinarian will explore the different potential causes to determine the root cause of the eye infection so that it can be properly addressed. There may be seasonal allergies to things such as grass and pollen, or to environmental pollutants like smoke or chemicals. Viral and bacterial infections will also be considered.

 

 

 

Treatment

 

This condition is commonly treated on an outpatient basis. If there is a suspected food or environmental allergen causing the infection, the issue should clear up when the identified allergen is removed from the cat's environment. If the infection is due to a virus, there are some commonly prescribed medications to manage the inflammation, including oral and topical (external) antibiotics. Vaccination is also a common treatment option to prevent against other viral outbreaks in the future. In serious cases, surgery may be required to remove any blockages that are found to be present in the eye.

 

Living and Management

 

Once the diagnosis has been made and a treatment plan has been prescribed, it is important to follow up with the animal's progress. The first step in the treatment plan will be to address the underlying medical cause if there is one present. Next, it will be important to isolate the cat so that it does not infect other animals.

 

Prevention

 

Limiting exposure to other animals that are possibly infected can prevent recurrence of conjunctivitis. Also, some vaccinations have proven effective at minimizing the risk of developing this condition.

 

 

Related Articles

Eye Infection in Newborn Cats
One of the infections that can affect a newborn kitten is infection of the conjunctiva,...
READ MORE
Corneal Disease (Inherited) in Cats
The cornea, the clear outer layer of the front of the eye, is most affected by corneal...
READ MORE
Eye Inflammation (Anterior Uveitis) in Cats
The uvea is the dark tissue at the front of the eye that contains the blood vessels....
READ MORE
  • Lifetime Credits:
  • Today's Credits:
Hurry Before All Seats are Taken!
Enroll
Be an A++ Pet Parent! Take fun & free courses to earn badges & certifications. Choose a course»
Search cat Articles

 

 

PETMD POLL

What do you use to prevent ticks from feeding on your pet?

Around the Web
MORE FROM PETMD.COM