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Addison’s Disease in Cats

Hypoadrenocorticism in Cats

 

Hypoadrenocorticism is characterized by deficient production of glucocorticoids (cortisol) and/or mineralocorticoids (aldosterone). Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids are hormones normally produced by the adrenal glands, which are located near the kidneys. Both of these hormones are critical to the healthy functioning of the body, and an abnormal increase or decrease of either of these hormones can lead to serious health problems if not addressed in time. Deficient production of both these hormones can affect the nervous system, the gastrointestinal system, the kidneys, or the cardiovascular system, and as a result, can lead to a number of symptoms, notably weakness, dehydration, low blood pressure, depression, heart toxicity, vomiting, blood in feces, and weight loss. No breed predilection is reported in cats, though it is very rarely reported in cats overall.

 

Symptoms and Types

 

Symptoms can vary depending on the duration of the problem. Life-threatening symptoms are usually observed in acute episodes of this disease. The following symptoms are commonly observed in cats:

 

 

Causes

 

  • Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency
  • Metastatic tumors
  • Long term glucocorticoid withdrawal

 

Diagnosis

 

You will need to give your veterinarian a thorough history of your cat's health and onset of symptoms. Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam on your pet, including routine laboratory tests, a complete blood count, biochemistry profile, and urinalysis. The complete blood count may reveal anemia, an abnormally high number of eosinophils (a type of white blood cells that readily stains with eosin dye), and an increased number of lymphocytes (also a type of white blood cell) called (lymphocytosis).

 

 

Serum biochemistry testing may reveal an abnormally higher level of potassium, and an accumulation in the blood of urea - nitrogenous waste products that are usually excreted out of the body through the urine (azotemia). Other findings include lower levels of sodium (hyponatremia) and chloride (hypochloremia), increased levels of calcium (hypercalcemia), increased liver enzymes, including ALT and AST, and low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The urinalysis may reveal a low concentration of urine. The definitive test for diagnosing this condition is by detecting the levels of cortisol in the body. Normally the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is produced by the pituitary gland, which then stimulates the adrenal glands to release their hormones. ACTH can be injected into the body to test the normal response functions of the adrenal glands. If your cat’s adrenal glands do not show an increase in the release of hormones after being given ACTH, then the diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism will be confirmed. Visual diagnostic procedures, like X-ray and ultrasound, may reveal smaller than normal adrenal glands.

 

 

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