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Mesothelioma in Cats

Treatment

 

Most pets can be treated on an outpatient basis. If your cat is having trouble breathing, it should be given a quiet place to rest. Activity, and anything else that might exert or stress your cat should be kept to a minimum. If your cat has an excess of fluid in any of its body cavities as a result of the mesothelioma, such as in the chest or abdomen, your veterinarian will need to hospitalize it for a short period of time in order to drain these cavities. If fluid has collected in the pericardial sac, surgery to relieve the pressure will be required.

 

Living and Management

 

Limit your cat's activity until its breathing is easier and no longer of concern. Slow walks close to home and gentle playtimes will be best until your cat has recovered. You will need to provide a safe and quiet space for your pet, away from active children or other animals while it recovers. If your veterinarian has prescribed cisplatin chemotherapy to treat the mesothelioma, you will need to continue to monitor your cat's progress with frequent follow-up visits in order to test your cat's kidney health, since some animals will have a toxic reaction to the chemotherapy medicine. Your veterinarian will also want to monitor your cat's chest and pleural cavity, using x-ray imaging, to be sure the mesothelioma has not metastasized.

 

 

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