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Liver Cancer (Hepatocellular Carcinoma) in Cats


Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Cats


Hepatocellular carcinoma describes a rare but malignant tumor of the epithelial tissues of the liver (the tissue that lines the cavities and surfaces of body structures – in this case the liver). This type of tumor is rare in cats – cats are more commonly affected by bile duct carcinoma. There are no breed predispositions, but affected cats are on average older than ten years of age.




The following symptoms are typically  absent until the disease reaches an advanced stage:


  • Lethargy
  • Weakness
  • Loss of appetite (anorexia)
  • Weight loss
  • Polydipsia (excessive thirst)
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Hepatomegaly (enlarged liver with uneven size); precedes development of overt clinical signs
  • Abdominal hemorrhage




  • Unknown
  • May be associated with chronic inflammation or hepatotoxicity (chemical-driven liver damage)
  • Toxins




Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam on your cat, including a complete blood profile, chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, a urinalysis and an electrolyte panel. A microscopic study of fluid taken from the liver by needle will be done to detect dysplasia (a pre-cancerous change in cells and tissues) and overt malignant features of cancerous cell spread. Occasionally, the only finding of the study is necrotic (dead) cells in the liver. A hepatic biopsy will need to be conducted in order to make a conclusive diagnosis. This will require that your veterinarian surgically remove a sample of liver tissue for laboratory analysis. A needle biopsy is not recommended.


Diagnostic imaging may include abdominal radiography to localize the tumor, and X-ray imaging of the chest to check for metastasis into the lungs.





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