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Nutrition Center -

Nasopharyngeal Polyps in Cats

Filed Under TheDailyVet

If young cats can avoid injury or infectious disease, they usually only see the veterinarian for preventive care. One condition that bucks this trend is called the nasopharyngeal polyp. Polyps are benign masses of tissue that can form...

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The Truth About Food Allergies in Dogs

Filed Under NutritionNuggets

Allergies are a common problem for dogs. Typical symptoms include itchiness resulting in excess scratching, biting, or licking, and sometimes chronic or recurrent skin/ear infections. While dogs most frequently suffer from allergies to environmental...

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Three Best Ways to Prevent Losing Your Pet

Filed Under TheDailyVet

For you, July 4th is another celebration of the United States’ independence and a chance to eat hotdogs. For your dog it’s the apocalypse, or the start of World War III, or maybe just a good old fashioned Armageddon. Regardless of...

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Flexibility is Key to Successful Cancer Treatment in Pets

Filed Under TheDailyVet

The 3-step mantra ingrained into my brain during my residency in medical oncology was to “name it, stage it, and treat it.” The philosophy is simple: First you must identify the disease process you’re dealing with (name...

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Your Pain Relief Cream Could Kill Your Cat

Filed Under TheDailyVet

We often don’t know that the medications we routinely use for our own ailments can be dangerous to our pets. A recent alert by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is a sad reminder. The FDA reports that in the last several years three...

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Related Content

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Cushing’s Disease in Cats Confusion With Cushings Disease Why Coverage for Chronic Diseases is a Big Deal

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Behavioral Changes

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Aggression, increased pursuance of food and water, exercise intolerance, lethargy, and difficulty moving around in their day-to-day environments (navigating stairs, going up onto elevated surfaces, etc.) are some of the behavior changes commonly...

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Dermatologic (Skin) Conditions

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Thinning hair and skin, chronic or unusual infections (bacteria, yeast, mange, etc.), the development of blackheads, and a darkened-appearance to the skin (especially on the abdomen) are all associated with Cushing's disease.

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Altered Body Composition

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Cushing’s disease leads to body composition changes, including abdominal distention and muscle atrophy. The abdomen takes on a pot-bellied appearance, which is primarily due to steroid-associated liver enlargement (steroids for inflammation...

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Panting (tachypnea)

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Increased respiratory rate is a very common clinical sign of Cushing's disease. Panting can occur despite being in a cool and comfortable environment. This type of heavy breathing may prevent your dog from resting properly during daytime...

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Increased Appetite (polyphagia)

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Cushingoid dogs are commonly hungry. Therefore, they are interested in eating larger and more frequent volumes of food and treats. Additionally, dietary indiscretion (eating something one should not) can be seen. Consumption of environmental...

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Increased Urine Output (polyuria)

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When more water is consumed, there’s an associated increase in the quantity of urine produced. Not only can you see your dog produce larger volumes of urine, but urinary frequency also increases. Dogs may inappropriately urinate inside...

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Increased Water Consumption (polydipsia)

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Corticosteroids cause mild to significant increases in water needs and consumption. Some dogs may feel impelled to drink any water they find. Therefore, it's crucial to have plenty of fresh water available so that water that may possibly...

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A Common Disease in Older Dogs

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By Dr. Patrick Mahaney, VMD Cushing's disease is a common endocrine (glandular) problem seen and middle-aged to older dogs. Also known as hyperadrenocorticism, the condition is caused by excessive corticosteroid production by...

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Treating UTIs in Dogs Quickly

Filed Under TheDailyVet

I am fascinated by the similarities and differences between human and veterinary medicine. One instance where the contrast between how vets treat animals and docs treat people came to the forefront when I was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection...

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10. Turnip Greens

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Turnip greens are very high in calcium and moderately high in oxalates and goitrogens. Finely chop or shred the vegetable and discard of its stem before providing to your lizard.

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9. Grape

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High in oxalates, grapes are a great treat for lizards. You can prepare grapes for your lizard by crushing or chopping the fruit.

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8. Collard Greens

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A favorite choice among vegetable staples, collard greens should have their stems removed and then be finely chopped or shredded before being providing to a lizard. Collard greens are high in oxalates and goitrogens.

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7. Blueberry

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An excellent source of antioxidants, but like other fruits should still only be fed in moderation to lizards.

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6. Yellow Squash

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Finely chop or shred this vegetable before providing to your lizard.

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5. Strawberry

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Remove the top of the strawberry, including the stem, and finely chop. Strawberries are high in oxalates and goitrogens.

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4. Celery

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The stalk and leaves of the celery can be a good staple vegetable for most lizards. You may want to finely chop or shred the celery, though, so your lizard doesn’t choke.

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3. Honeydew melon

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Finely chop and discard of rinds and core.

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2. Lettuce (Dark Green)

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Avoid iceberg lettuce, as it has little to no nutritional value for lizards. Instead, you can offer dark green lettuces such as romaine, Boston, and red leaf lettuces.

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Nutrition Questions
Answered By

Q. My pet is overweight, what should I look for in a food?

A. There are many therapeutic food options available. These foods have been formulated...

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Q. How does Hill's Metabolic Advance weight solution food work?

A. Hill's Pet Nutrition uses the most advanced technologies to understand how nutrients...

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Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?

A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients...

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