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On the Road with Kitty

 

 

The very first rule of traveling with your cat is to have an ID tag or other means of identification securely affixed to the kitty. Thousands of dogs and cats end up in shelters simply because the owners never dreamed the pet would get loose or become lost while on a trip. There are few disasters in a person’s life that are worse than having to drive off without a pet because all means of locating and recovery have failed.  This kind of tragedy will haunt you for the rest of your life; don’t let it happen. Get an ID tag, or at the very least microchip your cat!

 

Before you leave make sure you consider the option of leaving your cat in a hometown boarding facility  Many are just for cats and do not board dogs. Others have the cats well away from any sight, sound or smell of a canine. In fact, go and visit your local boarding facility and see what goes on there. 

 

Also, there may be a pet sitter in your area who would tend your pets in your own home. With a pet sitter you can even call home and tell your cat how much fun you’re having … Oh, and also how much you miss the rascal -- of course.

 

Below we'll list a few troublesome areas when it comes to cat travel and how to best facilitate a safe and enjoyable road trip. It's important to note that you should first take a number of local short trips before you go out on an all-day trip. An "all-dayer" is basically just a bunch of short trips anyway, right.

 

Motion Sickness

 

Anyone can get carsick, even humans. Most cats can overcome motion sickness by desensitizing them with repeat short, uneventful trips. Gradually accustom your cat to spending time in the car with the engine off, then with the engine on, then short trips, then the cross-country adventure. Prior to a long trip be sure the cat has had food and water available, then remove food and water at least three hours before you set off. 

 

You can also use anti-motion sickness medications to help settle the stomach and prevent the sometimes prolific drooling that occurs in a nauseous cat.  Most medications used to prevent motion sickness are very safe antihistamines and many cats eventually will travel without the aid of medical assistance. Just in case, bring a roll of paper towels.

 

What if your cat goes bonkers when they are in a vehicle? S/he probably has hyperactivity. These cats aren’t sick, they’re possessed!  Salivating, panting, whining, jumping from front seat to back, swatting at non existent butterflies and trying to cling upside down to the roof of the car are common characteristics of the hyperactive feline traveler.

 

This is different than motion sickness. Cats with motion sickness are generally quiet and even a little depressed because they feel awful. They will drool all over the place, maybe even pass stool, and eventually start vomiting. (Even with an empty stomach the vomiting reflex can be very strong.)

 

My Cat's Hyper

 

If you must bring the hyperactive cat with you, medication to sedate the kitty will surely make the trip safer, easier and less stressful for both you and the cat. The key is to administer them medication well before the trip starts.

 

Some cats start their Tae Bo routine as soon as they hear the word car! Be nonchalant, sneak a little medication in a treat, and don’t mention the C-A-R anywhere near the cat prior to your trip. If you believe your cat may be a candidate for medication, be sure to do a leisurely pretrip trial well ahead of the time you really need it.

 

About one cat out of ten will not respond in the common way to a particular medication or a particular dose. You do not want to find this out the morning of an eight-hour, midwinter trip through the Rockies to accept that national writing award you won for the article on "Logical Steps To Effective Planning".

 

Eyes on the Road!

 

Your attention should always be on the traffic, not on the cat! If your traveling pal is a good traveler, it might curl up next to you on the seat and, ah ... well, take a cat nap. Do not ever allow a pet to go near the driver side floor where the brake and gas pedals are located. And the dashboard must be out of bounds for safety sake.

 

 

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