http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/rss en “Do Cats Get Measles?” and Other Assorted Vaccine Questions http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/do-cats-get-measles-and-other-assorted-vaccine-questions-









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Feb 27, 2015 “Do Cats Get Measles?” and Other Assorted Vaccine Questions by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_149763');
As we’re all now well aware, measles is back with a vengeance. Ground Zero in this case: Disneyland.
 
What was once The Happiest Place on Earth became the Most Infectious Place on Earth, at least for a short period over the holidays. Those 40 infected people have spread the measles virus across the country. In the month of January alone, 150 cases in 17 states were reported nationwide. According to the California Department of Public Health, 20 percent of those cases wound up hospitalized.
 
Whenever these outbreaks occur, it’s natural for people to look around them and assess their environment for any and all risk factors, particularly when one is responsible for someone who is immunocompromised or too young to receive vaccines.
 
Veterinarians coach the team on what to say when the inevitable calls come in: “Can my cat give me measles?”
 
In one word: No.
 
The CDC states unequivocally that “measles is a disease of humans and is not spread by any other animal species.”
 
Rest assured, your cat is not incubating measles. Could he or she act as a fomite (something that carries the virus on it)? I suppose theoretically that could happen, as the virus can live on surfaces or airspaces where an infected person has touched or sneezed, but anything with any surface area whatsoever could do the same. I would be much more afraid of a doorknob in the ER than a cat who grooms itself daily, let’s put it that way.
 
Not to say your cat can’t pass anything on to you; they can and they do, though fortunately not on a regular basis. Regular preventive care and deworming will take care of parasites like roundworms or tapeworms, and getting bald or flaky patches checked out can help reduce your risk of catching ringworm from a cat. Cleaning pet bowls daily and washing hands after petting and feeding your cat will greatly reduce your chance of catching a bacterial infection from your cat.
 
The two most commonly talked about and deadly zoonotic diseases in cats are also pretty uncommon: Toxoplasmosis, aka “the one pregnant women are always worried about,” is actually pretty hard to catch from a cat despite the fact that they are the primary host.
 
Why is that? Toxoplasma is only actively shed in the feces for a couple of weeks after infection, and even then it takes a couple of days for the eggs to activate in the feces and become infectious. My obstetrician told me as long as I scooped the litter box every day I was fine, though that never stopped me from making my husband do it throughout both pregnancies.
 
Most cases of Toxoplasma in people come not from the household pet but from gardening, or from eating infected meat.
 
The other worrisome zoonotic disease is rabies. Left untreated it is a highly fatal disease that kills 50,000 people worldwide. It’s seen in almost all mammals and any of them can transmit the virus to people through a bite, though most human infections internationally result from dog bites. Vaccination regulations in the United States have kept the disease greatly in check, and thank goodness for that.
 
So the best way to keep yourself and your pet healthy and zoonosis free is pretty much what you’d expect: Wash your hands and take your pet to the vet on schedule. As long as you do that, your biggest health risk from your pet will be ankle sprains from tripping over them on the floor. At least that’s how it goes in this house.
 
 

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang
 
 
Source
 
CDC: Transmission of Measles
 
Image: Renata Apanaviciene / Shutterstock
< Previous Post








Save to mypetMD


Comments  0
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook

var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/do-cats-get-measles-and-other-assorted-vaccine-questions-#comments TheDailyVet Fri, 27 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32524 at http://www.petmd.com
What to Do When a Uterus Twists During Labor http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/what-do-when-uterus-twists-during-labor-32523









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 26, 2015 What to Do When a Uterus Twists During Labor by Dr. Anna O'Brien








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_885737');
You’ll have to pardon all the reproductive-centric blogs recently, but in the spring, that’s pretty much all we large animal veterinarians think about. We suddenly become OBGYNs to a handful of various species and, honestly, anything can happen.
 
When you get called out to help with a calving, you just never know what you’re going to find. Oftentimes, what you find is simply a calf coming backwards, or a leg is stuck. You reach in, fix it, and out it comes. Other times, it’s more complicated. For example: What happens when a cow’s uterus is twisted? Read on to find out more.
 
Uterine torsions are not uncommon in cattle, with estimates citing uterine torsion as 3-10 percent of calving problems in some dairy practices.
 
This problem most commonly occurs during the first stage of labor. The uterus flips over on itself, causing a twist at the junction between uterus and cervix. Obviously, this is a huge problem, as a twist right before entry into the birth canal will not allow the calf to be delivered.
 
What business does a uterus even have flipping all over the place? Good question. We don’t really know, but experts suspect it has to do with the lack of attachments of the uterus to the body wall.
 
There are two really strong ligaments, called the broad ligaments, which supply most of the support and stability to the uterus. During the final trimester, this uterus, which is carrying upwards of a one hundred pound calf and fluid, mind you, is enormous and mostly rests along the bottom of the abdominal cavity, softly snuggled between the rumen and intestines. If a cow were to stand up abruptly, fall, get pushed by another cow, or have some other sudden movement, there’s a possibility this uterus could gain enough momentum to swing around its longitudinal axis and cause problems.
 
Your first clue that a cow has a uterine torsion is the fact that she hasn’t progressed into the second stage of labor, which is where she lies down, actively pushes, the calf enters the birth canal, and then you see feet. During a vaginal exam, you won’t be able to extend your arm into the dilated cervix and touch the fetus. Instead, you’ll feel a corkscrew where the uterus is twisted and has pulled the cervix into a spiral.
 
Logically, the way to correct a uterine torsion is to un-twist it. However, this is easier said than done. The simplest way to fix a torsion is to lay the cow on the ground and roll her over. This doesn’t always work and you have to be careful not to roll her the wrong way!
 
Logistically, sometimes there just isn’t enough room to do this on the farm or you don’t have enough help. Rolling a 1,700-pound, fully pregnant Holstein is no easy feat.
 
There is also a tool called a detorsion rod. If you can reach the calf’s feet through the twisted cervix, which you sometimes can depending on how tightly twisted it is, you can attach chains to the feet and use this small metal contraption to start swinging the uterus in a standing cow. With luck and skill, you can sometimes get the uterus to flip itself using this method.
 
If these methods fail or you are unable to do them, you now have to resort to a C-section. This way, you can deliver the calf and then, while you’re in there, de-twist the uterus from the inside. With the calf out, this isn’t too bad.
 
After all is said and done, you’re exhausted and filthy but hopefully have a live calf. And then you check your messages and find there are two more calvings waiting for your help! The fun sometimes never seems to stop in the spring.
 
 

Dr. Anna O’Brien
 
 
Image: ChiccoDodiFC / Shutterstock
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad GDV 02/26/2015 06:12pm Is a twisted uterus at all like a dog with GDV (twisted stomach)? If you must resort to a C-Section, do you take the opportunity to tack the uterus to the abdominal wall? Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/what-do-when-uterus-twists-during-labor-32523#comments TheDailyVet Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32523 at http://www.petmd.com
Does Your Veterinarian Owe You a Guarantee? http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/does-your-veterinarian-owe-you-guarantee-32522









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 25, 2015 Does Your Veterinarian Owe You a Guarantee? by Dr. Joanne Intile








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_145403');
A while back, an advertisement from a competing veterinary hospital crossed my desk. The glossy postcard was printed with the hospital’s logo on one side, and on the reverse, a statement indicating the surgeons were now offering “lifetime guarantees” on a particular commonly performed veterinary orthopedic procedure.
 
I don’t remember the exact details of what was promised, but I do recall the sour taste in my mouth I developed when I read the card. When I considered the implications of the above-mentioned “warranty,” I couldn’t help feeling a widening in the notch of disappointment regarding some aspects of my chosen profession.
 
As consumers, we’re constantly inundated with the concept of “Money Back Guarantees” for products or services. Nearly everything we purchase can be returned if we’re unsatisfied with the outcome, fit, taste, or performance. Though we are ingrained to be wary buyers, overly accommodating businesses and an overwhelming sense of entitlement pave the way for us to be lax in maintaining our end of the bargain.
 
We’re taught slogans like “the customer is always right” at a very early age. We expect “reward cards” at retail stores or fast food restaurants. Our competitive (and materialistic) society offers us advantages such as “perks,” “cash back,” “loyalty points,” or “rebates” for simply offering up our initial (and hopefully repeat) patronage.
 
We no longer simply accept an apology when dinner entrees are botched or flights are cancelled due to inclement weather. In addition to a full refund of our financial input, we demand further incentive for our “troubles.” “What’s in it for me?” pervades when we get anything less than our way.
 
Should these ideals apply to veterinary medicine?
 
As a veterinary oncologist, it would be impossible for me to offer any guarantees for how a patient might respond to any particular therapy. There are so few cancers I treat where I have enough evidence-based information at my disposal to offer owners an accurate sense of outcome. And I always have to keep in mind that patients can sometimes get better in spite of my intervention, rather than because of it.
 
The larger question is whether offering pet owners a lifetime guarantee on a particular procedure or treatment or therapy is actually detrimental to our profession.
 
I’m concerned that this approach to patient care further perpetuates an already damaged approach to the health care of our pets, where veterinarians are asked to offer gold standard medical care with a “car repair shop” mentality.
 
We’re often expected to determine a diagnosis without diagnostics, being accused of wanting to run every analysis in the book just for financial gain.
 
We are asked to treat based on possibilities rather than certainties when owners don’t want to put their pet “through anything,” even when the remedy could be far more toxic than the test.
 
Sick pets are “dropped off” with the hope of being restored to a state of wellness, not unlike an aging automobile in need of restitution.
 
People disapprove of the notion that medicine is an imperfect science, yet this is supported daily in exam rooms around the world.
 
Reality tells us patients can worsen despite our best attempts to heal them. Technological advancements designed to eliminate human error and streamline healthcare are ultimately subject to the fact that doctors are mere mortals. Repaired fractures break down. Incisions become infected. Samples get lost. Pets die. These are the bare truths of our profession.
 
Even when I’m certain the most appropriate treatment for a patient is drug “X,” I may prescribe that particular medication and the pet may wind up with a terrible and unpredictable allergic reaction. Statistics tell me a cat should be cured with a procedure I recommend, but they could experience relapse of disease within a few short months. I may offer a grave prognosis to a distraught owner, only to have them contact me a year later to let me know their pet is alive and well.
 
How can doctors offer a guarantee of services when dealing with a complicated living organism?
 
If we continue to treat veterinary medicine like other service industries, I’m certain all involved parties will wind up nothing short of disappointed.
 
Clients will not be happy when presented with the “fine print” that is sure to be tacked onto their warranties.
 
Veterinarians will not be happy feeling as though they must accurately predict an animal’s outcome or else be faced with refunding their fees.
 
The only guarantee veterinarians should offer is a commitment to upholding their oath taken upon graduation:
 
The Veterinarian’s Oath:
 
Being admitted to the profession of veterinary medicine, I solemnly swear to use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society through the protection of animal health and welfare, the prevention and relief of animal suffering, the conservation of animal resources, the promotion of public health, and the advancement of medical knowledge.
 
I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity, and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics.
 
I accept as a lifelong obligation the continual improvement of my professional knowledge and competence.
 
 

Dr. Joanne Intile
 
 
Image: Composite, Deyan Georgiev and TheSimplify / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Genetics 02/25/2015 05:56pm I find it difficult to imagine any kind of guarantee in medicine, whether it be for pets or people. Each individual is different. I have one right now that Leukeran doesn't seem to affect. I had one a few years back that couldn't tolerate the recommended dosage and it had to be cut in half.

There are so many differences to consider, whether it be genetics, environment or something else. Sometimes something just doesn't work for one, but works well for another.

Cross your fingers that the kitty currently on Leukeran doesn't turn into a steroid-induced diabetic like the one that couldn't tolerate the Leukeran full dose. Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/does-your-veterinarian-owe-you-guarantee-32522#comments TheDailyVet Wed, 25 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32522 at http://www.petmd.com
New Hope for Antibiotic Resistance in Humans and Pets http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/new-hope-antibiotic-resistance-humans-and-pets-32518









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 24, 2015 New Hope for Antibiotic Resistance in Humans and Pets by Dr. Ken Tudor








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_669554');
In August of last year I posted about the growing threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria to worldwide health. This topic is so important that it is increasingly seen as the biggest problem for human and veterinary doctors in the not too distant future.
 
One of the contributors to bacterial resistance has been that there has not been a new class of antibiotics introduced in over 30 years. Research, government regulations, and economic forces have all played a role in this lack of scientific investigation. That may all have changed now that a new class of bacteria was discovered in the back yard of a microbiologist.
 
Bacteria, Fungus, and Antibiotics
 
Most of us are unaware that the miracle we call antibiotics are produced by bacteria and fungus. These microbes have been producing antibiotics for billions of years to protect themselves from other bacteria and fungi. But we were not aware of these life-saving properties of microscopic bugs until Alexander Fleming showed that a common mold inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus in a petri dish in 1928. Fleming had discovered penicillin. It would not be until the late 1940s that penicillin could be mass produced and used to treat wounded American soldiers during World War II and the Korean War.
 
Think about this. Doctors and veterinarians had no antibiotics to treat disease until the early 1950s. Antibiotics have only been a part of medical and veterinary therapy for 60 years. Antibiotics were introduced only 29 years before I started practicing veterinary medicine. I can’t imagine being a veterinarian during the times of James Herriot and treating animals without the benefit of antibiotics. After the amazing discovery of penicillin, the medical power of bacteria and fungi was released. In this short period of time we now have 20 different classes of antibiotics from different bacteria and fungi.
 
What is a class of antibiotics? A class of antibiotics has a specific molecular structure and is from a particular group of bacteria or fungus that targets a specific group of disease-causing bacteria. New classes of antibiotics have given us medical practitioners multiple weapons to fight disease. With the 30 year drought in new antibiotic discovery and the overuse of antibiotics during that time, disease causing bacteria have become resistant to this vast arsenal of drugs. Diseases once again have the better poker hand.
 
The New Bacteria and New Antibiotics
 
Bacteria and other microbes are finicky and refuse to grow in laboratories. That is why microbiologists have found antibiotics from only 1% of wild microbial species. The other 99% won’t bend to our laboratory will. But some scientists have found a work-around. By collecting soil samples from the backyard of a colleague, scientists used a technology to individually identify bacteria and then return them to the soil to multiply in their own habitat rather than in the lab. They were able to produce large colonies of a soil bacterium called Eleftheria terrae that uses the secret weapon teixobactin to protect itself from other bacteria.
 
It turns out that teixobactin is a triple threat against disease causing bacteria. It destroys many types of drug-resistant bacteria, it is safe to use in any mammal, and bacteria cannot easily develop resistance to it.
 
Teixobactin kills other bacteria by destroying their cell wall. Many present day antibiotics kill bacteria by the same method of cell wall destruction. But the way teixobactin does it makes it difficult for bacteria to develop resistance and avoid destruction like they do with other antibiotics.
 
The scientists chose the toughest treatment test for teixobactin. They infected mice with a fatal dose of MRSA (flesh eating Staphylococcus that is resistant to virtually every antibiotic). The mice were injected with teixobactin one hour after the MRSA infection. Every mouse survived.
 
The exciting part of this discovery is not just the finding of teixobactin, but the new technology that allows the cultivation of bacteria in their own habitat. Scientists will be able to work with a far greater percentage of Earth’s microbes; this will open possibilities far beyond teixobactin. Man may once again control disease-causing bacteria for the long term — with help from our own backyards.
 
 

Dr. Ken Tudor
 
 
Image: Ivan1981Roo / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Antibiotics 02/24/2015 05:42pm What great news and what an epiphany for the scientist who thought to grow bacteria in dirt.

Fingers crossed that this gets fast-tracked and proves to be effective and safe. Reply to this comment Report abuse 2
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/new-hope-antibiotic-resistance-humans-and-pets-32518#comments TheDailyVet Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32518 at http://www.petmd.com
Where’s the “Controversy” in the Vaccine Controversy? http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/wheres-controversy-vaccine-controversy-32517









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 23, 2015 Where’s the “Controversy” in the Vaccine Controversy? by Dr. Jennifer Coates








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_604688');
The ongoing human measles outbreak has brought the term “vaccine controversy” back into the news, but every time I hear it I want to scream. There is NO controversy. Vaccination against a myriad of diseases, including measles, has saved countless lives. To prevent children from benefitting from the benefits of vaccination is… I’m searching for a politically correct word here… illogical.
 
You might wonder what any of this has to do with veterinary medicine. Well, veterinarians run into vaccine naysayers all the time. Now before I get inundated with nasty comments, I want to be clear that I am not talking about owners who want (and deserve) to have a rational conversation about which vaccines their pets actually need. Current guidelines divide recommended vaccines into “core” and “noncore” categories.
 
Every animal should receive its core vaccinations. Exceptions should only be made when a serious health concern (e.g., a previously documented anaphylactic reaction) makes the risk outweigh the benefits of vaccination.
 
Noncore vaccines should be given to some individuals but not others. The decision is mostly made based on a pet’s lifestyle and the incidence of disease in the area. Examples of noncore vaccines include parainfluenza virus and Bordetella bronchiseptica for dogs and feline leukemia virus (FEV) for cats.
 
Core Vaccines for Dogs

Rabies
Canine Distemper Virus
Canine Adenovirus Type 2
Canine Parvovirus Type 2

 
Core Vaccines for Cats

Rabies
Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (Herpes Virus)
Panleukopenia (Feline Distemper)
Calicivirus

 
Vaccine titers are available for owners who are interested in keeping the number of vaccinations their pets receive to an absolute minimum. Adult booster shots can be delayed until a titer reveals that the pet has inadequate antibody levels in their bloodstream.
 
This system does a great job of protecting pets from disease while simultaneously preventing the administration of unneeded vaccines, but it isn’t enough to convince everyone.
 
When I am faced with an owner who is reluctant to vaccinate, I try to explain my approach to medical decision making. Every choice involves risk. There is risk involved with action and there is risk involved with inaction. If you don’t vaccinate your pet, yes, you eliminate the chance of an adverse vaccine reaction, but you greatly increase the risk of that individual becoming ill or even dying from the disease in question. When a veterinarian designs an appropriate vaccination schedule for a particular pet, the risk from disease is always much higher than is the risk from vaccination.
 
And it’s important to remember that vaccination doesn’t just protect the pet getting the vaccine. Herd immunity develops when a large enough proportion of the population has been vaccinated against a particular disease. Vaccinated individuals prevent the disease from gaining a foothold in the community, which keeps individuals who cannot be vaccinated safe. Some pet vaccines can even protect people. Several years ago, one of my unvaccinated patients exposed me, a veterinary technician, and his owners to rabies.
 
We are currently seeing the devastating effect that poor vaccine decision making can have in the human measles outbreak, as well as an outbreak of canine distemper in Texas. It’s not surprising that these diseases have responded to a lack of herd immunity in similar ways; the causative viruses are closely related to one another (in the past the human measles vaccine was used to protect young puppies from distemper). Hopefully, these outbreaks will also fade in a similar manner and both parents and pet owners will renew our commitment to vaccination before the next outbreak occurs.
 
 

Dr. Jennifer Coates
 
 
Image: Ivonne Wierink / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Vax 02/23/2015 06:14pm It would seem to me that dogs that socialize and any pet in a household that has fosters should be vaccinated. While boosters could certainly be postponed if a titer shows immunity, I cannot imagine not protecting our pets from these horrible diseases.

Not to mention, rabies vaccines may be mandatory in a lot of places. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/wheres-controversy-vaccine-controversy-32517#comments TheDailyVet Mon, 23 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32517 at http://www.petmd.com
Fifty Shades of Dog - What Women Really Want in a Man http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/fifty-shades-dog-what-women-really-want-man-32515









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 20, 2015 Fifty Shades of Dog - What Women Really Want in a Man by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_669694');
Fifty Shades of Grey is, no doubt, a polarizing book. Count me among the women who simply did not get how anyone could be so obsessed with Christian Grey.
 
I had a few problems with him, such as his stalking and his weird fits of anger, but I really knew the second we entered his apartment that Mr. Grey could never be the man of my dreams. After all, he didn’t have any pets, and that, out of all the other transgressions of character — that will never do. I tried to imagine how a person like him would react to my Golden aggressively drooling on his assorted designer ties, and it all went downhill from there.
 
I admit it: I’m a sucker for dogs. When I’m walking down the street and a really cute Boston is heading in the other direction, my head swivels around like one of those shampoo commercials where the guy on the sidewalk walks into a telephone pole when the female object of his admiration prances by. I can’t help it. I’ve been this way since I was about five.
 
I’m oblivious to the person on the other end of the leash most of the time, dropping to my knees and cooing in appreciation before looking up and striking up a conversation with the owner.
 
Most people understand my motivations are pure, though there have been a few tense moments when a nervous looking man stares at me in horror a second or two before his significant other swoops in to give him a dirty look. They are faultless, of course. The dogs run to me of their own volition, sensing a person who very possibly has some meat residue in her pockets.
 
I understand why people mistake my genuine interest in pets as a covert attempt to meet the person; after all, the "dog as wingman" trope has been around as long as Budweiser’s been making commercials, perhaps longer. Which is why I read an article revealing that Young women find dogs sexier than smartphones, according to a Retrevo.com study, with such bemused interest.
 
Was anyone surprised by this?
 
My husband works in the cell phone industry, and I will tell you with complete conviction that not once in our seventeen year history have I once had any interest in the myriad of gadgets he’s pulled out of his briefcase. If anything, they drive me more and more nuts. The flip phone led to the smart phone and now the fitbits, the wifi enabled lightbulbs, and a bunch of other devices I am completely ambivalent about.
 
I love him despite his gadget obsession, not because of it. Let me put it to you this way: On Valentine’s Day, while we were waiting to be seated at a cozy Italian restaurant, he asked his wrist watch to record The Walking Dead on our home TiVo. Yes, his watch. I was not nearly as impressed as he thought I was going to be.
 
When I first met him, he lived in a house with two other guys and a really funny cat. The cat wasn’t his, but he got a roommate bump in my estimation for liking the cat. His other roommate had a pufferfish who would jump up and down out of the tank every time it saw one of the guys head into the kitchen, where they would grab a piece of frozen shrimp and toss it to the appreciative creature.
 
To this day he thinks he won me over with tickets to David Copperfield, but in reality, I was his the moment he stopped what he was doing to go feed a happy fish. When we bought our first house and I finally had room for pets of my own, I brought home three animals before we had a dining room set. Then it became a home.
 
Last week, well-known writer and director Kevin Smith lost his Labrador Mulder. The often wry and subversive Smith posted a heartfelt picture on Facebook, showing him cradling the dog while he looked off to the side with a tear streaked face. The post had something like 52,000 comments.
 
“That dog made me a better human being,” he said, and that about sums it up. Perhaps on some base level we know this intuitively, and this is why so many of us automatically gravitate towards people who seek out the joy and love pets bring to our lives. Tell me the last time anyone said that about a laptop.
 
There aren’t a lot of deal breakers in my life when it comes to relationships. Root for whatever sport team you want. I don’t care if you’re Apple or Android. The toilet paper can go over or under and I will manage. But if you don’t like dogs, well, you won’t like me. Anyone else out there feel the same?
 
 

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang
 
 
Image: Christin Lola / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  6
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
Dr. Patty Khuly Agreed 02/20/2015 12:23pm Agreed on the 50 shades thing: The only woman who'd fall for a Grey is a self-loather. I read half of the first book and found it profoundly troubling in its extreme misogyny. THIS is what women find sexy? God save the human race!

As to Kevin Smith: Now THAT's a real man. Good thing he finally grew up! ;-)

Great reading you again, btw! Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 02/22/2015 12:11am Oh wow! HI DR KHULY! I feel so honored you stopped by!

You know, I read the whole dang trilogy and lost at least 10 IQ points in the process. I kept thinking, wait for it, at some point it's going to get better and I will understand why this woman is a kazillionaire...but it never happened. On the other hand, reading the critiques has provided me many hours of genuine entertainment. Reply to this comment Report abuse 4 g77sisco metoo7777@yahoo.com 02/20/2015 12:28pm I absolutely feel the same way. My 2 dogs are a big part of my life, and I can't imagine having a boyfriend or husband who was even just neutral to them. My 3 sisters have dogs, and their husbands love their furry family members just as much :) Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 02/22/2015 12:41am I got up to 4 pets at one point, though we're down to two right now. I'm still working on my husband. Some day, he'll let me bring more home, I just know it. Reply to this comment Report abuse 3 TheOldBroad Critters! 02/20/2015 05:45pm A man must like/love critters. I don't care if it's dogs or cats or pufferfish, although I certainly admire a man that really likes cats.

On the same subject, if my cats don't like someone, I trust that. My Darlene (RIP) used to do all sorts of silly things to get the attention of service people. (She especially liked plumbers.) One poor gentleman could barely write the ticket because Darlene was rolling all over his clipboard and looking at him longingly at the same time. What was interesting was all those that my cats fussed over, after chatting a bit, I found they usually had a houseful of pets. Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 02/22/2015 12:04am I really wish my dog were a little more picky. One time we had a plumber come into the house- my husband told him to let himself in- and I walked out of the bedroom to find some strange guy hanging out with Brody in the foyer and I had no idea he had arrived. I mean, it was fine he was there, but I would have appreciated some sort of warning. That's a Golden for you. Reply to this comment Report abuse 2
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/fifty-shades-dog-what-women-really-want-man-32515#comments TheDailyVet Fri, 20 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32515 at http://www.petmd.com
Positions, Please - A Birth On the Farm http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/positions-please-birth-farm-32514









Save to mypetMD


Comments  2
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Lambing 02/19/2015 05:10pm Great post! I loved helping out.

Do sheep ever have a small problem that can be solved by putting a hand in the birth canal? (Think: cow) Or is it too small? Reply to this comment Report abuse Dr. Anna O'Brien 02/24/2015 07:45pm They certainly do! Many obstetric problems in sheep and goats can be fixed with a bit of manual manipulation (for example maybe a leg is twisted back or the lamb/kid is breech or twins are trying to come out at the same time). Obviously, small hands help and luckily I have small hands! Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/positions-please-birth-farm-32514#comments TheDailyVet Thu, 19 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32514 at http://www.petmd.com
Kitty Kollege: Where Smart Cats Go to Learn http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/if-cats-went-college-32512









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 18, 2015 Kitty Kollege: Where Smart Cats Go to Learn by Dr. Joanne Intile








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_446284');
This week, let's take a break from medicine and look at pet caretaking from a lighter point of view. I present to you this farcical take on a college course catalog: If cats went to college.
 
Kitty Course Calendar: Spring 2015
 
We are excited to present our course offerings for the Spring 2015 semester at Kitty Kollege. We are delighted you have elected to enroll at our institution and welcome you with open arms (though we understand completely that you won’t stand being held for more than 0.7 seconds.)
 
We recommend you select your courses carefully and speak with your career advisors before registering. However, as we are well aware, you are cats; we know you will do what ever it is you feel like doing, with or without human input.
 
Good luck!
 
Vocational Courses
 
Artful Vomiting: Explore your creative side while learning to accurately expel gastric contents onto expensive pieces of furniture, bedding, and flooring. Having trouble aiming your partially digested kibble away from surfaces that are easy to clean on to more complicated fabrics? Want to learn how to produce up to six perfectly symmetrical, yet variably hued, pools of bile over a the space of a single living room? Need to learn the secrets to upchucking quietly under the bed so your special “present” won’t be found for years? This is the course for you!
 
Meets: Monday mornings, Thursday evenings, and randomly for three days in a row TBD.
 
 
Advanced Ants In Your Pants!: This upper level course is designed to teach agile felines how to perfect their technique of randomly running around at top speed while simultaneously making “bird noises” and then stopping to jump up on the wall while yowling like their tail is caught in an electric socket.
 
Meets: Nightly between 12 a.m. - 2 a.m.
 
 
Introduction to Picky Eating: Learn how to voraciously ingest a tiny sample of cat food one single time, then refuse to eat that product again only after your human has purchased a significantly large and expensive quantity of it. Perfect your ability to sit and stare disdainfully at a completely full bowl of dry cat food. Emphasis will be placed on learning to vocalize loudly whenever your human opens the refrigerator or pantry door.
 
Meets: Every Tuesday and random Thursdays only.
 
 
Credit Courses
 
Boxes Are Awesome!!!: This is an introductory course designed to teach kittens and young adult cats the wonders of four-sided cardboard containers. Participants will learn how to leap in and out of the boxes, beginning by randomly sitting on a flat piece of paper, then working your way up to larger, more elaborate structures such as sinks, shipping boxes, and suitcases. You will learn to love the feeling of being confined in a small space while peering eerily outward at your human.
 
Meets: Holidays, Birthdays, and Vacation Days.
 
 
Making Muffins!: Can’t get enough of kneading your claws on tingly and tantalizing tactile teasing fabrics such as fleece, velvet, or cashmere? This course will be devoted entirely to perfectly pleasing your paws as you learn how to gently extend and retract your toes and nails, while simultaneously squinting, purring dreamily, and snoozing. Warning: Due to hygiene concerns, droolers will not be permitted to take this course!
 
Meets: Daily during cat nap hour.
 
 
Knock It Off: Frustrated by your human's incessant need to disrupt your valuable time spent aimlessly sitting on a kitchen countertop, desk, or TV stand by placing pesky objects like pens, drinking glasses, or remote controls directly in your path? This course will teach you everything you need to know to swiftly and deftly bat those annoying nuisances off the edge of what is rightfully your space. The first part of the semester will focus on the basics of swatting, with a focus on timing and speed of limb/tail movement, while the second half will dive deeper into techniques such as “wait to do it until the humans sit in another room,”, “keep pushing it off no matter how many times they replace it,” and the Kitty Kollege patented move of “turn your head away from the object, swipe, jump down, and knock it under the coffee table.”
 
Meets: Monday and Wednesday during dinnertime.
 
 
I’m Not Going In There!: This course is designed to desensitize students with phobias associated with the confined spaces of a cat carrier. You will learn relaxation techniques designed to suppress your urge to contort your body in physics defying directions when a human attempts to place you inside “The Box.” You will no longer feel the need to scream and empty all of your orifices of their biological contents at once when placed inside the carrier.
 
Meets: Saturday mornings at the local veterinary clinic. 
Course prerequisite: Boxes Are Awesome!!!
 
 
Stranger Danger: Students will learn the basics of “Kitty Self Defense” from our accredited personal safety instructors. No cat is sheltered from the potential horrors that could be inflicted by the world’s most terrifying perpetrators, including all non-immediately recognizable human beings, the sound of a doorbell (including those from the television), other furry four-legged creatures humans refer to as “dogs,” and the most terrifying monster of all time: The Vacuum. Participants will learn how to puff up their tails, pin their ears back, and run swiftly under the nearest bed when presented with each of the aforementioned triggers.
 
Meets: Saturday mornings and randomly throughout the semester with no advanced notice.
 
 
Once again, we are so thrilled you have decided to matriculate at Kitty Kollege!  We look forward to serving all of your needs, both academically and socially. 
 
Please do not hesitate to stare at us disparagingly, sleep just out of our reach on our beds, and tear into our tender flesh as we continue to force our love on your precious furry bellies.
 
 

Dr. Joanne Intile
 
Image: Aivolie / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  3
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Math Course 02/18/2015 04:56pm "Introduction to Picky Eating: Learn how to voraciously ingest a tiny sample of cat food one single time, then refuse to eat that product again only after your human has purchased a significantly large and expensive quantity of it"

All this time I thought it was actually a math course. Cats can count. Whatever you have the most of, they won't eat.

Great post! It produced quite a few chuckles. I think all my cats went to Kitty Kollege. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1 srobertson398 Looks more like K-garten. 02/20/2015 08:45am I, Gracie, have well surpassed those kittenish courses. An advanced computer class would be better or how to open containers. Our humans could use a few courses to make life better for us like speaking cat and proper servant behavior (they still are deluded thinking they are in charge). Reply to this comment Report abuse TheOldBroad 02/20/2015 05:32pm So very true. Perhaps a class on finding a way to have opposable thumbs? Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/if-cats-went-college-32512#comments TheDailyVet Wed, 18 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32512 at http://www.petmd.com
'Do You Have to Take My Pet’s Temperature Rectally?' http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/do-you-have-take-my-pets-temperature-rectally-32510









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 17, 2015 'Do You Have to Take My Pet’s Temperature Rectally?' by Dr. Ken Tudor








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_803278');
Admit it. You wince and even dislike it when the veterinary nurse takes your pet’s temperature rectally. If your pet is sensitive and even aggressive when approached back there you are even more uncomfortable with the procedure. Some pets get so upset that the attempt to take a rectal temperature may result in a falsely high temperature reading.
 
I actually tell my staff not to take a rectal temperature if it is extremely upsetting to the pet or owner. But a pet’s body temperature is an extremely important piece of information, especially if the examination is because the pet is not feeling well. So what are the alternatives and how accurate are they?
 
Methods for Measuring the Temperature of Animals
 
There are 3 main methods for getting a pet’s body temperature:

Rectally with a mercury or digital thermometer
Axillary (pit of the front legs) with mercury or digital thermometer
Ear with an infra-red thermometer

 
The rectal temperature is considered the “gold standard” for measuring the internal core body temperature of pets. Even though fecal material, rectal inflammation, colon contractions, colon muscle tone, and physical activity (struggling to get the temperature would qualify) can affect measurements, research suggests it is still an accurate measure of core body temperature.
 
In general it is easy to perform a rectal temperature and requires only 30 seconds to 2 minutes, depending on the type of thermometer. Mercury and digital thermometers are reasonably priced so this is the most common method of obtaining a pet’s temperature in veterinary hospitals.
 
Taking an axillary temperature was commonly used in human medicine, especially with infants and younger children. This method can be used in veterinary hospital for animals that resist the rectal approach.
 
It was thought that the axillary temperature coincided closely with a rectal temperature. Recent research suggests that the correlation is not as close as thought. For pets with normal or low temperatures, the axillary temperature does not consistently match the rectal temperature. Even though actual temperature readings vary from axilla and rectal readings, the axillary method does not detect hyperthermia or fever in pets as well as the rectal method. If an animal is feverish the axillary temperature will pick-it up.
 
In humans the axillary temperature has been largely replaced by the forehead scan. Due to our pets’ fur and different sweat apparatus the forehead scan has yet to be proven useful in veterinary medicine.   
 
Reading the temperature of the ear canal is also used in human medicine and is increasingly being used in veterinary medicine. The infra-red technology allows the temperature to be determined in seconds. Because the reading is taken so quickly it is generally possible to get the positioning necessary for an accurate reading without too much fuss and discomfort, though I have had some dogs that do not like this method and make it somewhat more difficult than necessary. Accuracy is dependent on the infra-red beam hitting the eardrum, so if the pet won’t hold its head still it can be hard to get the scope in the right position.
 
There is conflicting research as to whether the ear method matches or correlates with rectal temperatures and represents a true reading of core body temperature. The veterinary grade instrument for measuring ear temperatures costs just over $200. It also requires a constant supply of disposable covers for the scope head. The company that makes the veterinary model also sells a non-professional version for around $40. Whether it has the same accuracy as the professional model, to my knowledge, has not been tested.
 
Because of the questionable reliability and the expense, ear temperatures may not become a universal technique in veterinary medicine. Hopefully, the technology will evolve and confidence in the readings will improve. That would certainly be much better than squeamishly suffering through the rectal procedure performed on your baby.
 
Which technique does your vet use?  


Dr. Ken Tudor
 
 
Image: aspen rock / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Axillary Temperature 02/17/2015 05:58pm I've not seen anyone do or attempt to take an axillary temperature on a critter. I'm guessing the pet must be super relaxed and agreeable. Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/do-you-have-take-my-pets-temperature-rectally-32510#comments TheDailyVet Tue, 17 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32510 at http://www.petmd.com
Your Dog's Nose is Even More Powerful Than You Think http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/your-dogs-nose-even-more-powerful-you-think-32503







The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 16, 2015 Your Dog's Nose is Even More Powerful Than You Think by Dr. Jennifer Coates








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_869222');
I love to go on walks with my dog, but Apollo and I have very different ideas about what the point of a walk should be. I am out for exercise with a side of sunshine and fresh air. Apollo’s goal is to smell… absolutely everything! This leads to conflict. I want to keep moving and Apollo wants to stop, and then walk, and then stop, and then walk…
 
We all know that a dog’s sense of smell is better than our own, but do you know just how much better? I recently watched a TED-Ed Lesson that starts with an excellent explanation of just how a dog’s nose works:
 
As your dog catches the first hints of fresh air, her nose’s moist, spongy outside helps capture any scents the breeze carries. The ability to smell separately with each nostril, smelling in stereo, helps to determine the direction of the smell’s source so that within the first few moments of sniffing, the dog starts to become aware of not just what kind of things are out there but also where they’re located.
 
As air enters the nose, a small fold of tissue divides it into two separate flows, one for breathing and one just for smelling. This second airflow enters a region filled with highly specialized olfactory receptor cells, several hundred millions (300,000,000) of them, compared to our five million. And unlike our clumsy way of breathing in and out through the same passage, dogs exhale through slits at the side of their nose, creating swirls of air that help draw in new odor molecules and allow odor concentration to build up over multiple sniffs.
 
But all that impressive nasal architecture wouldn’t be much help without something to process the loads of information the nose scoops up. And it turns out that the olfactory system dedicated to processing smells takes up many times more relative brain area in dogs than in humans. All of this allows dogs to distinguish and remember a staggering variety of specific scents at concentrations up to 100 million times less than what our noses can detect. If you can smell a spritz of perfume in a small room, a dog would have no trouble smelling it in an enclosed stadium and distinguishing its ingredients, to boot.

 
The video goes on to talk about how our sense of sight and hearing present us with a picture of a single moment in time, while a dog can smell “an entire story from start to finish.” It also explains how the canine vomeronasal organ lets dogs “identify potential mates, distinguish between friendly and hostile animals, and alerts them to our various emotional states. It can even tell them when someone is pregnant or sick.”
 
I had reached what I thought was a pretty good compromise with Apollo on our walks. He got to dawdle at the beginning, but at all other times he was expected to get his nose off the ground and keep up the pace. Now, I think I’ll give him a few more opportunities to stop and smell the roses, so to speak.
 
Take a look at this TED-Ed Lesson; it will give you a new appreciation for what your dog can do with his nose.
 
 

Dr. Jennifer Coates
 
 
Image: Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad TED 02/17/2015 05:54pm It's so nice to know there are other TED fans out there! Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/your-dogs-nose-even-more-powerful-you-think-32503#comments TheDailyVet Mon, 16 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32503 at http://www.petmd.com
Not All Seizures Can Be Linked to Tumors in Dogs http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/not-all-seizures-can-be-linked-tumors-dogs-32502









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 13, 2015 Not All Seizures Can Be Linked to Tumors in Dogs by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_634738');
When I was eight we took in what was to be the sickliest, most decrepit puppy of all times; my Lhasa Apso mix, Taffy. I suppose her regular visits to the vet were what inspired me on my career path. Among her many problems, such as flea allergies, glaucoma, and recurrent ear infections, she also had epilepsy.
 
Though her seizures were terrifying, they were also blessedly rare. She fit the mold when it came to epilepsy. They started when she was three years old. It’s a very challenging diagnosis because there’s not really a good definitive test for it. You need to rule out other neurologic problems like infections and tumors with fairly invasive and/or expensive tests, and many owners elect to assume it’s primary epilepsy till proven otherwise when the seizures start in a young dog.
 
When a dog is over five years of age when the seizures begin, it’s a different story. An otherwise healthy 10-year-old Corgi who suddenly develops recurrent seizures? Conventional wisdom in veterinary medicine leads us to start putting cancer at the top of the list. The epilepsy in this case is secondary to the cancer. For some owners, that means finding a neurologist or oncologist to begin the process of MRIs, spinal taps, and intensive management, while others decide to go with the veterinarian’s best judgment and treat what is assumed to be secondary seizures as best as possible.
 
Being told your suddenly seizing older dog probably has a brain tumor is, understandably, very traumatic for people. The fact that the dog's behavior is so hard to predict leads to a good deal of anxiety for owners waiting to see what the next day will bring. More seizures? Sudden aggressive behavior? Or nothing?
 
In this month’s Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, a retrospective study of 99 dogs over the age of five with epilepsy shows that we have more cause for hope than we thought. While the majority of these dogs did have epilepsy secondary to another neurologic problem like cancer, infection, or stroke, a substantial number — between 23% to 45% depending on age — actually did have primary epilepsy.
 
Why does this matter? Because the prognosis for primary epilepsy is better than that for a brain lesion. While most brain cancers lead to progressive worsening of symptoms and eventual euthanasia, a good number of dogs with primary epilepsy can be controlled with daily medication. Some dogs, Taffy included, had seizures rarely enough where she didn’t even require that.
 
I love this study because it’s nice to see a journal article that gives people hope where maybe there was little before. The authors are quick to remind readers that an MRI and analysis of spinal fluid is still very much recommended in older dogs with seizures, but if it’s completely out of the question, not all hope is lost.
 
Seizure disorders are frustrating for both owners and veterinarians by the very nature of the nervous system. All those bones and tough sheaths that do such a great job protecting the nervous system also make it difficult to analyze. Nonetheless, your veterinarian can offer you a good bit of guidance to help you decide on a plan if your dog develops seizures later in life. Seizures don’t automatically mean death.
 
And Taffy? She died at the ripe old age of 15. Not from epilepsy, but heart failure.
 
 

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang
 
 
Reference
 
Epilepsy in dogs five years of age and older: 99 cases (2006–2011). Ghormley TM, Feldman DG, Cook Jr JR. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2015 Feb 15;246(4):447-50
 
 
Image: Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  2
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Phenobarbital 02/17/2015 05:51pm Is phenobarbital used in pets like it is in humans for seizures? Reply to this comment Report abuse 02/25/2015 11:03pm It sure is! Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/not-all-seizures-can-be-linked-tumors-dogs-32502#comments TheDailyVet Fri, 13 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32502 at http://www.petmd.com
The Immune System's Complicated Relationship with Cancer http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/immune-systems-complicated-relationship-cancer-32500







The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 12, 2015 The Immune System's Complicated Relationship with Cancer by Dr. Joanne Intile








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_422720');
There appears to be an association between the development of cancer and the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. A person’s (or a dog’s or cat’s) immune system is on constant surveillance for foreign substances in the body. Whether searching for rogue bacteria, viruses, or cancer cells, our immune cells constantly prowl for anything not considered “self.”
 
Tumor cells are devilishly and unexplainably clever, developing mysterious capacities to avoid detection by their host’s immune system. In fact, their existence is often predicated on an ability to co-exist alongside the same cells designed to eradicate them.
 
Cancer patients are considered to have altered immune systems. The question of whether this alteration is the catalyst for tumor development, or perpetuated by their disease or treatment, or a combination of each of those factors, is an interesting one.
 
There’s an increased risk of cancer in human organ transplant recipients. These patients are chronically medically immunosuppressed in order to prevent tissue rejection. This is thought to lead to an impaired ability for the recipient’s immune system to survey their body for mutated cells, leading to tumor development.
 
Organ transplants are infrequently performed in veterinary patients, however it is possible to perform kidney transplants in cats with chronic renal disease. Feline patients are also medically immunosuppressed, just like their human counterparts.
 
A 2002 study showed that about 10% of feline renal transplant recipients developed lymphoma, with a median time to tumor development of nine months.
 
A different study conducted in 2009 showed that cats that received transplants had more than six times higher odds of developing malignancy as compared to control cats.
 
A 2014 study showed a little more than 20% of cats that received kidney transplants, over half of which developed lymphoma. The median interval between transplantation and diagnosis of lymphoma was nearly two years.
 
When examining the effects of cancer treatment on the immune system, a common consequence of chemotherapy or radiation therapy is something called myelosuppression. Myelosuppresion refers to a decreased number of white blood cells and occurs secondary to the treatment’s negative effect on the production of immune cells. Patients that are myelosuppressed have far fewer cells available to fight off antigens, making them more susceptible to infection. 
 
Myelosuppression does not equate to immunosuppression, however. An immunosuppressed person has a poorly functioning immune system, regardless of the number of cells available at any given time, whereas a myelosuppressed person has normally functioning immune cells, present in greatly reduced numbers.
 
When it comes to cancer development, one must consider: Does myelosuppression lead to the ability of tumor cells to “slip by” undetected and progress within a host due to failure of adequate recognition?
 
Individuals with defects/deficits in in their immune system may be potentially predisposed to tumor development. But the larger question in my mind is, “Does the connection between immunity and cancer extend to a point where the immune system can be manipulated to prevent or treat disease?”
 
A great deal of public attention is given to the implications of cancer and it’s relationship with the immune system.  The number of available “success” stories where a person or pet’s cancer was cured with supplements, nutraceuticals, and/or diet changes designed to “boost” immunity suggest the answer is yes. 
 
I’ve written before about my concerns regarding terms such “immune boosting” and why I know that it’s not really possible to do this medically, and why, even if it were possible, this would be a bad thing for the body. 
 
I believe the immune system is a relatively untapped resource for preventing or treating cancer. The relationship is complicated and there is a staggering amount of research aimed at investigating this exact topic.
 
I appreciate the relationship between immunity and cancer development and possess a desire to further understand the link to be able to provide owners with evidence-based information to help them make the best choices for their pets.
 
Until that point is reached, I’ll continue to recommend the treatments I am confident in, and I’ll continue to reserve judgment on the alternative treatments until the evidence is on the table. 
 
 

Dr. Joanne Intile
 
 
Image: vnlit / hutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  5
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Cancer Cells 02/12/2015 06:29pm Since cancer cells are creating within the body, I'm assuming they have the same DNA/RNA as the host. Is it at all possible that might be the reason the immune system doesn't see cancer cells as something to fight? Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 TheOldBroad 02/12/2015 06:30pm Uh, that's CREATED within the body. Typo alert! Reply to this comment Report abuse Dr. Joanne Intile 02/13/2015 10:48am Hi

Thanks for the question - that's part of of the problem, but it actually becomes much more complicated than that. The cancer cells actually figure out ways to reduce the expression of markers on their surface that would make them visible to immune cells and also express other ones that sort of allow them to "fly under the radar". They also can work to potentially reduce the efficacy of the immune cells response to their presence (this is how we "think" cancer - related immunosuppression can occur. It's a complicated system and research is just starting to put things together. But it's probably the most effective tool we will have at prevention of cancer in the future. Reply to this comment Report abuse akabettyore Autoimmunity vs cancer 02/14/2015 12:03am This is A few years ago, my allergist mentioned some research going on about whether allergies, being the body's autoimmune system way of attacking things it considered dangers and whether those of us suffering from allergies may end up with a lowered incidence of cancers developing. In some ways, it makes a lot of sense. If our bodies are always seeking out cancers, etc, it would explain why it senses so many other things trigger the histamines. if one's body is always in immunity overdrive, is it just fighting these cancer cells that are trying to attack? Given that allergies seems to be rising at an alarming rate as well as many cancers, it will be interesting to see if this research pans out, will those who suffer from allergies be at a lower risk, barring transplants and other immunity compromising treatments, be less likely to develop malignancies?
Reply to this comment Report abuse KLND 02/16/2015 05:36pm Interesting. My dog suffers from multiple allergies and until recently was on immunosuppressing drugs. I was anxious to get him off of the drugs because I was worried about an increased cancer risk. I would like to believe there is a silver lining to his over active immune system and maybe he is at less risk for cancer because of it. Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/immune-systems-complicated-relationship-cancer-32500#comments TheDailyVet Thu, 12 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32500 at http://www.petmd.com
The Sexy Side of Goats http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/sexy-side-goats-32496









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 11, 2015 The Sexy Side of Goats by Dr. Anna O'Brien








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_508973');
Given Valentine’s Day, I was thinking about writing something love-related. However, the only thing that was coming to mind was how weird goats can be. I’m talking hermaphrodites, pseudopregnancies, and something called “cloud burst.” If you’re the curious type, read on.
 
Hermaphrodites
 
Yep, goats can be anatomically confused sometimes. To be medically correct, most goat hermaphrodites are male pseudohermaphrodites because they have testes. True hermaphrodites have both testes and ovaries. These are much more rare in goats. Goat male pseudohermaphrodites are genetically female. When they are born, they appear female on the outside. But when they hit puberty, they grow larger than the other females in the herd and may act aggressively toward other goats (and people!) during the breeding season. Testes are usually located in the abdomen, although sometimes they can be partly descended and confused for an udder. Confused yet?
 
Keep in mind that pseudohermaphroditism is a spectrum and one case may not look like another case. Even though the testes in these animals produce testosterone, which causes the masculine behavior, they are unable to produce sperm and are therefore sterile.
 
Cloudburst
 
Dairy goats can have false pregnancies relatively frequently. This condition is sometimes referred to as cloudburst. Due to hormonal imbalances, a doe can look, feel, and act pregnant. Her abdomen will enlarge and she will even produce milk. However, when it comes time to give birth, only cloudy discharge (hence the name) is produced.
 
Weird, right? If a client knows that a doe has not been bred and therefore suspects a pseudopregnancy, an ultrasound will reveal a fluid-filled uterus sans fetus. An injection of a hormone called prostaglandin will cure the problem.
 
Precocious Udder
 
Precocious udder is the delightful term for the not so delightful udder development in non-pregnant female goats. There are a few different causes for this condition. The most common cause is directly hormonally related, either because of prolonged exposure to progesterone due to the ovary’s inability to release an egg, or because we have a case of “intersex” (see above!). Other times, it is due to consumption of feeds that have a high estrogen concentration, such as moldy corn or clover.
 
Although tempting, these udders should not be milked because milking can perpetuate the issue. Sometimes the udder dries up on its own, but usually we have to interfere by administering exogenous hormones.
 
Ringwomb
 
When the cervix fails to dilate properly at birth, this is called ringwomb. More common in sheep than goats, this problem is heritable. It is infuriating for clients, since it requires a C-section to deliver the babies. It also requires the clients to consult their farm’s breeding records to determine if this is a repeatable problem in their does or ewes. I often recommend a client get rid of a ewe or doe who has this issue, as it may occur again the next time they breed her. And since it appears to be genetic, they want to remove affected animals from their breeding flock.
 
Gynecomastia
 
Male goats in some heavy milk-producing breeds can develop their own udders, some even functional! Most likely a hormonal issue linked with genetics, reducing the amount of protein fed can sometimes control male lactation, but sometimes it is disruptive enough that a mastectomy needs to be performed.
 
 

Dr. Anna O'Brien
 
 
Image: WhoAreYou / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  4
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Neutering 02/11/2015 05:58pm "I often recommend a client get rid of a ewe or doe who has this issue, as it may occur again the next time they breed her."

Can they be neutered/spayed so it isn't a problem? Sounds like these might make great pets. After all, "getting rid of" doesn't prevent the next person from trying to breed the poor critter. Reply to this comment Report abuse 2 staciejaye 02/13/2015 11:23am Absolutely agree. I was taken aback to read that from a vet..."get rid" of animal?? I'm grateful this is not my vet. Animals are not disposable! Reply to this comment Report abuse 1 Dr. Anna O'Brien Farm animals 02/13/2015 06:25pm Please keep in mind these are livestock, being raised on farms for production of meat, milk, or wool. These animals are not pets. Whether a farmer keeps or removes animals from his/her herd is usually a business decision. "Getting rid of" can indicate many things, most commonly sending the animal to the sale barn, where it might get purchased by someone looking for a pet or companion animal, or it might very well be purchased for slaughter. "Getting rid of" could also mean giving the animal to a neighbor or friend who is looking for a companion. This is the nature of the farm animal realm. Perhaps my choice of words was not the best. While animals are not disposal, farm animals most commonly do meet their ends for economic means.

Spaying of farm animals is not performed. This is an extremely invasive surgery as opposed to the relatively simple surgery of castration in males, due to the fact that a female's reproductive organs are deep within the abdominal cavity. The only exception I've come across is on very rare occasion when a mare is spayed because of ovarian hormonal disturbances affecting her personality. Reply to this comment Report abuse mesumner 02/15/2015 01:48pm Dr. O'Brien, thank you for your clarification and explanation of the intended meaning for the use of the word 'rid.' However, I agree with the previous comments that it was not the most appropriate word to describe scenarios for the future of these biologically confused goats. Your audience, the PetMD audience, is very sensitive to humans discounting the importance of animals lives especially when they don't fulfill the expectation of 'production.' I too was dismayed by the use of the word by a Vet, as my animal companions are an extension of my family with all the work and sacrifice that comes with any other familial responsibility. I share the sentiment that using the word 'rid' minimizes their importance in our lives... I do not have human children, but I hardly think I could conceive the the thought of getting rid of a child or a family member who does not function within the acceptable standard. I will go further and suggest that the notion that it would be 'infuriating' to provide medical care to an animal having complications while giving birth is, in itself, infuriating... That owner needs to surrender those animals and hope that it isn't inconvenient for his/her family to provide care when he/she has a heart attack from a inheritable disease. Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/sexy-side-goats-32496#comments TheDailyVet Wed, 11 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32496 at http://www.petmd.com
Are Breed Standards Causing Obesity in Cats? http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/are-breed-standards-causing-obesity-cats-32471









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 10, 2015 Are Breed Standards Causing Obesity in Cats? by Dr. Ken Tudor








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_902555');
Last February I shared some research that suggested American Kennel Club (AKC) breed standards in dogs could predict individuals at risk for obesity.
 
The AKC descriptions of ideal show qualities for “bolder” breeds encourages breeding for dogs that pack on more fat. These dogs were bred to work in colder climates, so having a “thrifty gene” that promoted the maintenance of body fat made sense. These dogs no longer work, but the show language perpetuates the same genetic stock that is prone to obesity now that lifestyles have changed.
 
Cats were not bred for work, but for show. Yet, it turns out that breed standards defined by the American Cat Fanciers Association (ACFA) also encourages breeding cats that are prone to obesity. The findings were just released in the current issue of the Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition.
 
The Study
 
The same researchers that did the AKC study at a Dutch dog show conducted the new research at a cat show. Simply, they examined 268 show cats and assigned each a Body Condition Score (BCS) and then compared the results to the descriptors used for the ideal show qualities for each cat’s breed.
 
To review, a BCS is a visual/palpation 9-point method of assessing a pet’s body fat percent. This simple system has been shown to correlate perfectly with the sophisticated duel-energy X-ray absorptiometry, or DEXA, for measuring body fat. BCS scores of 1-3 are for cats that are too thin. Perfect, Goldilocks cats have a BCS of 4-5. Cats with a BCS of >5-7 are considered overweight, and cats with a BCS of >7-9 are considered obese.
 
The researchers found that almost 46% of the 268 cats had a BCS greater than 5. That means almost half of the cats in the show were overweight. They also found that almost 5% were obese. A not so surprising finding was that 90% of neutered adult males and 82% of neutered adult females were overweight with a BCS greater than 5.
 
Sexual alteration is a well-established risk factor for obesity in cats and requires dramatic lifestyle changes after surgery. Sadly, however, almost 44% of intact males and 29% of intact females also had a BCS greater than 5. It appears that intact show cats also need some lifestyle changes.
 
Most interesting is how the BCS compared to the language describing the ideal body type of the breeds.
 
Breed Differences
 
The following are some of the descriptors used by the ACFA for ideal standards of lean breeds:

Regal
Lithe
Firm muscle tone
Slender
Fine boned
Prominent cheek bones
Medium frame

 
So how did these breeds stack-up?

 
It looks like Goldilocks perfection, right?
 
 
Now compare these descriptors of more robust breeds and their BCS results:

Large, almost square
Sturdy
Bull neck
Substantial bone structure
Broad chest
Large and imposing
Robust power
Short and cobby

 

 
And these cats are all considered, by medical standards, overweight
 
There are a couple of possibilities to explain the results of this study. One might think that certain cats also poses the “thrifty gene” like dogs and breeding to meet show standards strengthens the tendency to spare body fat. I do not know if there is research to support that possibility. Another explanation could be the standards themselves. In striving to meet show qualities, breeders may be selecting genetic traits that promote an overweight physique.
 
Given that excess fat and obesity is the major condition affecting pets, especially cats, it might be time for the ACFA to re-think their breed descriptions and standards. The percentage of overweight and obese cats at this show, neutered and un-neutered, far exceeds the estimated percentages of overweight and obese cats in the general population. It would be interesting to know if the show was an anomaly or if it represents cat shows in general.
 

Dr. Ken Tudor
 
Source
 
R.J. Corbee. Obesity in show cats. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr  2014;98(6):1075-1079
 
Image: Maciej Czekajewski / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Show Standards 02/10/2015 06:48pm I blame show standards for pretty much removing the face of some breeds. It's my understanding that Persians used to have a "real" face with a nose. Now they're almost concave.

Why is it that extremes seem to receive ribbons and encourage poor health? Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/are-breed-standards-causing-obesity-cats-32471#comments TheDailyVet Tue, 10 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32471 at http://www.petmd.com
Shar-Peis Are a Genetic Nightmare http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/shar-peis-are-genetic-nightmare-32470
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/shar-peis-are-genetic-nightmare-32470#comments TheDailyVet Mon, 09 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32470 at http://www.petmd.com
Veterinarians Are People Too... And Mistakes Are Sometimes Made http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/veterinarians-are-people-too-and-mistakes-are-made-32465









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 06, 2015 Veterinarians Are People Too... And Mistakes Are Sometimes Made by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_338901');
Hi there, I’m Dr. Vogelsang, but most people call me Dr. V because no one knows how to pronounce Vogelsang. I’m so happy to be hopping on over to the petMD family here at The Daily Vet, and before I plop my feet on the couch and start talking to you about whatever it is we feel like talking about, I thought I should introduce myself.
 
If you ever saw what I wrote over at pet360, or even the guest piece I stuck my toe in over here at The Daily Vet a little while ago on the topic of raw diets, you probably know a little bit about how I approach life and dogs. If you haven’t seen what I wrote, I thought, rather than give you a long list of places I’ve attended and topics I discuss, I’d just tell you a story about a ham sandwich.
 
The day was a Thursday, sometime in the late 2000s. I was attempting with minimal grace to balance life as a veterinarian with two preschool-aged kids and multiple pets. It was a chaotic time. If I made it out the door with matching socks I considered myself a success, which was a long way from the younger, childless version of me who hired a dogwalker on my work days and dressed the dogs up in custom costumes every Halloween. Life changes, as do we.
 
On that morning, I was running through the kitchen pulling my shoes on as I grabbed snacks off the shelves for the kids, running close to late. There may or may not have been a diaper explosion involved. As I hurried, I saw my dog Emmett raising his eyebrows at me as I realized I still had to feed him. I plunged my hand into the bin we poured the dog food into and my hand waved back and forth, hitting nothing but dust. Gone, all gone. I hadn’t even realized we were running low.
 
Panicking, I upended the bin and a couple of old stale crumbs dribbled out. “Maybe I can just give him some dog treats,” I thought, but the two paltry dog bones piled in the bowl seemed like a poor breakfast.
 
So I did what anyone else would do with two minutes left in their morning before being officially late for everything: I made him a ham sandwich. Hold the mayo, of course.
 
Emmett was thrilled. Usually he didn’t get to eat stuff like that unless he stole it off a plate or my father was visiting.
 
When I got to work and explained my morning to the staff, they looked at me as though I had poured a nice tall glass of Drano into his water bowl.
 
“A ham SANDWICH!” they exclaimed incredulously. “Why ever would you give a dog a ham sandwich*?”
 
“Because I ran out of dog food,” I said. “I didn’t want him to go hungry. What would you have done?”
 
“I don’t know,” said my tech. “I’ve never run out of dog food.” (She has three young boys now, by the way, and I’m pretty sure she’s run out of dog food more than once. Just sayin’.)
 
“Aren’t you worried he’s going to get pancreatitis?” asked my other tech.
 
“My two year old fed him butter last week,” I said. “I think he’s going to be OK.”
 
My point here — and I do have one, I promise — is that I am both a veterinarian with an interest in telling you all the things you ought to do, and a human who all too often manages to not live up to those perfect expectations herself. Do I believe dogs should eat a properly balanced diet? Absolutely. Do I believe every single meal that passes their mouth must in and of itself represent a complete and balanced diet? I repeat, ham sandwich. So you know, sometimes you have to improvise in life.
 
So that’s me in a nutshell. Think of me less as the stoic vet lecturing you from the bowels of the Internet and more like the neighbor who sees you running around in your bathrobe on trash day and loves you anyway. I’m here to help, we’re here to talk, and I’m here to help you manage the best you can every day to live a good life with your pets.
 
And I know, more than most, that some days are better than others.
 
 
*Please note, I do not advocate feeding your dogs ham sandwiches or butter. Poor dietary choices are a reflection of the insanity of everyday life with toddlers and not an express endorsement.
 
 

Dr. Jessica Vogelsang
 
 
Image: Jaromir Chalabala / Shutterstock
 
 
Related
 
Dangers of Alternative Diets, Including Raw Food Diet
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  2
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Welcome to the Family 02/06/2015 05:35pm Love the ham sandwich story! It's so nice to know that people we hold in high esteem are just as human as we are.

Welcome to the family. Reply to this comment Report abuse 3 jesvet 02/06/2015 10:40pm Thank you so much! Having read the Daily Vet for a while I feel like you are an integral part of the family too! Looking forward to being here. Reply to this comment Report abuse
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/jvogelsang/2015/february/veterinarians-are-people-too-and-mistakes-are-made-32465#comments TheDailyVet Fri, 06 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32465 at http://www.petmd.com
'Why Do Different Doctors Treat Pet Cancer Differently?' and Other Questions Answered http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/why-do-different-doctors-treat-pet-cancer-differently-32464









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 05, 2015 'Why Do Different Doctors Treat Pet Cancer Differently?' and Other Questions Answered by Dr. Joanne Intile








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_214948');
In matters of pets and cancer, there are certain questions I encounter more frequently than others. Despite the myriad of diagnoses and their associated treatment options I am tasked with explaining, troubled owners have more typical concerns: How did my pet get cancer? Will he or she become sick from treatment? What is my pet’s prognosis?
 
Less common questions arise and are equally as important to address, mainly because they tend to surface after owners have already committed to a treatment plan. Assuaging an owner’s concerns once a pet has started receiving chemotherapy can be tricky at best, and near impossible at worst.
 
Here are some examples of the less routine questions I face:
 
1. "Why do different oncologists have different protocols/cutoff blood counts for treatments, or administer treatments differently?"
 
Owners are surprised to hear different recommendations from different oncologists. I’ve encountered this when owners see me after their pet has started treatment elsewhere and are continuing care with me, or after they’ve done some research and discovered protocols online or via other doctors. The expectation is that there’s a “precise” way to treat a particular cancer. However, this tends to be a major oversimplification for most of my patients.
 
Even for cancers considered to have a true “gold standard” of care, often the nuances of the protocols are slightly different for each attending doctor. Typically this varies with their training, personal experience, and familiarity with the disease in question.
 
I use the analogy of baking chocolate chip cookies. Everyone has their favorite recipe for doing so, but the outcome is typically the same as long as the major ingredients are kept equal.
 
2. "Can my dog/cat with cancer still receive vaccines and flea-tick/heartworm medication?"
 
I would consider this a “hot button” topic in veterinary oncology, meaning it’s one that is likely to evoke considerable emotion and opinion but lacks factual information to support an actual “correct” answer.
 
Other than injection site sarcomas in cats, no information exists to support the concept that vaccinations lead to cancer in pets. Yet, some oncologists do not advocate vaccinating their patients, while others are fine with doing so.
 
We know that dogs undergoing treatment with chemotherapy can mount adequate immune responses to vaccination, which supports the notion that their immune systems function adequately in the face of anti-cancer treatment.
 
What we don’t know is if the physical act of vaccination could result in some sort of stimulation of the immune system that could contribute to cancer progression or relapse of disease, or a patient becoming refractory to a previously successful treatment.
 
People with a history of cancer are instructed to receive influenza vaccines, not because they are more prone to developing the flu, but because they are more likely to develop complications resulting from infection. Other than this, veterinary oncologists have surprisingly little data from our human counterparts to help base our recommendations on.
 
I answer this question on a case-by-case basis with owners and discuss the pros and cons of vaccinating versus not vaccinating. It’s a decision we reach together in a truly holistic fashion, where concerns for the pet’s safety and the family members' safety are considered together.
 
3. "Isn’t there a treatment for my pet’s cancer that comes in a pill form? I’ve heard oral chemotherapy is less toxic and less likely to cause side effects in my cat/dog."
 
The vast majority of cytotoxic chemotherapy prescribed in veterinary patients is administered intravenously (IV). There are a few oral cytotoxic treatments available, but these forms are not considered any less toxic than their IV counterparts. In fact, the chemotherapy drug most likely to cause a lowered white blood cell count in dogs is an oral medication called CCNU (aka Lomustine).
 
The idea that oral chemotherapy is less noxious for a pet is false. Any chemotherapy has the potential for adverse effects. The good news is, when prescribed correctly, the risk is absolutely minimal.
 
4. "My dog/cat was recently diagnosed with cancer, but he/she is not acting sick. Isn’t it better to wait to start treatment until they are showing signs of their disease?"
 
I hear this question most frequently from owners of dogs with lymphoma, as many of those patients are diagnosed incidentally. Unfortunately, waiting to treat any pet with cancer until they are manifesting outward signs usually means a poorer outcome.
 
Pets who are self-sufficient, meaning they are eating well and not having vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, breathing difficulties, or other adverse clinical signs, tend to have a better response to treatment and are also less likely to experience side effects. Therefore, the most ideal time to institute therapy is immediately following a diagnosis.
 
5. "Why do you draw blood samples from neck veins?"
 
For most pets with cancer, and nearly all pets undergoing chemotherapy treatments, routine blood samples are drawn from the jugular vein. This is a large vein located on either side of the neck, which drains blood from the head region.
 
Although it sounds somewhat barbaric, obtaining blood samples from the jugular vein is a common procedure in veterinary patients. Oncologists prefer to reserve smaller, more peripherally located veins along the limbs for the administration of injectable chemotherapy. Therefore, every attempt is made to reserve the integrity of these veins for administration of treatments and to avoid excessive scarring.
 
*
 
I hope this is useful information for anyone researching his or her pet’s diagnosis and trying to make decisions about their care. As always, I urge you to seek consultation with a board certified veterinary oncologist in order to obtain the most up to date information as well as to establish the most appropriate treatment plan for your pet.
 
Visit these sites to find a board certified veterinary oncologist near you:
 
Veterinary Cancer Society
 
American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
 
 

Dr. Joanne Intile
 
 
Image: Stefano Tinti / Shutterstock
 
 
Related
 
The Frustrating Vaccine Related Sarcoma
 
Tumor Related to Vaccinations in Cats
 
Tumor Related to Vaccinations in Dogs
 
Vaccine-Associated Sarcoma and Your Cat
 
Newly Identified Viruses May Be Linked to Cancer in Cats
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Cancer Treatments 02/05/2015 06:17pm And just because Fido/Fluffy has a diagnosis with the same words that a person has heard previously, there may well be a difference in bloodwork or symptoms.

I completely agree that starting treatment as soon as possible will hopefully give the best outcome. My Josie was just beginning to lose a little weight (a few ounces each month) and the regular doctor was watching it.

We did bloodwork and then an endoscopy for biopsies. Alas, she has lymphocytic lymphoma. I'm hoping that by finding it and treating it before she really manifested symptoms will give her a quality of life for a much longer period. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/drjintile/2015/february/why-do-different-doctors-treat-pet-cancer-differently-32464#comments TheDailyVet Thu, 05 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32464 at http://www.petmd.com
Dental Care for Cows, Goats, and the Surprisingly Vicious Llama http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/dental-care-cows-goats-and-surprisingly-vicious-llama-324









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 04, 2015 Dental Care for Cows, Goats, and the Surprisingly Vicious Llama by Dr. Anna O'Brien








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_294528');
Last week we talked about horse teeth, which receive a lot of attention in the large animal veterinary realm. There’s floating and removing wolf teeth and estimating age based on tooth wear — equine dentistry has a little bit of everything. But what about our other farm animals?
 
Cattle, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas have a major difference in their dentition as compared to horses. These ruminants and pseudoruminants do not have incisors on the top, only on the bottom. Instead, on the top they have what is called a dental pad, which is a thick, hard gum line where the animal can pinch blades of grass, nipping the forage off with the bottom incisors. All farm species still have top and bottom molars for grinding in the back of the mouth.
 
Calves have a set of 20 deciduous (baby) teeth, all of which come in by the age of two weeks. Then, starting at about a year of age, the permanent adult teeth start erupting. Over the bovine’s next few years, a total of 32 adult teeth will emerge with the outer incisors taking the longest to erupt between 36 and 48 months of age. This provides an estimator of age for animals under 4 years.
 
All told, an adult cow or bull will have six incisors along the bottom front of the jaw, one canine on each side following the outer incisor, then three premolars and three molars in each cheek quadrant.
 
Cattle don’t typically have the uneven wear issues with their teeth like horses do. This may be largely in part due to the fact that most cattle are housed such that they can maintain a diet of constant grazing, versus many horses that are not allowed to graze as often as they should. Instead, cattle suffer from various bacterial mouth issues, stemming mostly from the fact that around the barn and in large feeding bunks lie sharp, pointy objects that undiscerning cattle slurp up with the rest of the hay or grain. These infections have cool, archaic names like lumpy jaw and wooden tongue and calf diphtheria, and are usually treated with a round of antibiotics.
 
Like cattle, sheep and goats have 20 deciduous teeth and 32 adult teeth, all in the same places as their larger bovine counterparts. As ruminants and small ruminants age, their incisors begin to space apart and become worn, creating gaps between the teeth. At ages beyond five years, incisors begin to fall out occasionally and the animal has what is referred to as a “broken mouth” which I always thought was a little harsh considering a sheep or cow or goat can do just fine with a few missing front teeth. I think it gives them character.
 
Alpaca and llama dental care is very different from both horses and ruminants. While camelids have an upper dental pad instead of top incisors just like ruminants, their lower incisors continually grow longer throughout the animal’s life and can sometimes protrude beyond the upper lips and interfere with grazing. For this reason, many camelids need their lower incisors trimmed. A veterinarian usually does this easily with a drill. Just shaving the tops off the incisors is usually all that’s needed on a yearly basis.
 
Male camelids also have canine teeth. These are often referred to as “fighting teeth” and for very good reason. Males use them for fighting other males in the herd to establish dominance. These fighting teeth are razor sharp and males can inflict serious damage on each other, going for legs, ears, and, yes, testicles. The camelid world is a brutal world.
 
For safety reasons, we often remove the fighting teeth in males. Females can have them too, but they often barely break the gum surface and are very small — nowhere near the daggers of the males. Removal of fighting teeth is fairly simple, often involving only a wire to saw through the tooth at the gum line.
 
Most males don’t get their fighting teeth until they reach two to three years of age. Some late bloomers may get them at six or seven years. And the real kicker? There are two canines on each side of the upper jaw, one on each side of the lower jaw. That’s a total of six fighting teeth. Sometimes it’s like opening a shark’s mouth!
 
So, there you have it — farm animal dentistry in a nutshell.
 
 

Dr. Anna O'Brien
 
 
Image: Brad Wynnyk / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  2
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad In The Wild 02/04/2015 05:45pm "and can sometimes protrude beyond the upper lips and interfere with grazing"

How do alpacas and llamas deal with this in the wild? Or do they not live long enough in the wild for it to be a problem? Reply to this comment Report abuse Dr. Anna O'Brien 02/09/2015 07:55pm I believe that in the wild, which for alpacas and llamas are the high mountains in South America, these animals have a much harsher life style. No soft alfalfa hay for them. Instead, it's rough grass and whatever else they can nibble on. I think this probably helps keep tooth length in check in the wild. If not, survival of the fittest occurs. Teeth too long to cope? Then you're out of luck and hopefully won't be passing those genetics to the next generation. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/aobriendvm/2015/february/dental-care-cows-goats-and-surprisingly-vicious-llama-324#comments TheDailyVet Wed, 04 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32463 at http://www.petmd.com
Voice Changes in Pets: More Serious Than You Think http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/voice-changes-pets-more-serious-you-think-32462









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 03, 2015 Voice Changes in Pets: More Serious Than You Think by Dr. Ken Tudor








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_755185');
Do you remember the last time you got a bad cold and lost most or all of your voice? It was annoying, but not a serious problem. Well, the same is not true for pets. If their voice changes or is lost it is a big deal and not just a cold.
 
The Voice Box or Larynx
 
Animals are able to make sounds by creating vibrations of vocal cords or folds. These fibrous cords are part a rigid chamber at the beginning of the trachea or windpipe called the larynx or voice box. The vocal folds open and close the opening of the trachea, producing the characteristic bark and growls of dogs, the meow and purr of cats, and our own voices. When the vocal folds close, they close the tracheal airway. This is why we can’t breathe and talk at the same time. The same is true when dogs bark and cats meow.
 
The cat is unique in that its vocal fold cords have an additional membrane called the ventricular cords that are used for purring. They can vibrate these rapidly without closing the trachea completely and can breathe when they are purring. So how do animals lose their voice?
 
Reasons for Voice Loss
 
Vocal sounds are made by the physical vibration of the vocal folds. The vibrations are initiated and controlled by nervous signals from the brain through nerves to the larynx. Changes or loss of voice are caused for two reasons: mechanical interference with vocal cord vibration or lack of stimulation of the nerves to the vocal cords.
 
Mechanical Interference
Simply put, this is anything that physically makes it hard for the vocal cords to vibrate. Our cold virus is a good example. The swelling from infection and inflammation interferes with normal cord function and our voice changes. However, upper respiratory infections are not the major source of voice loss in dogs and cats.
 
Although some young animals may have voice changes with severe neonatal virus infections, this seldom happens in older animals. Mechanical interference is more likely to be caused by:

Abscesses — Foxtails eaten by dogs and sometimes cats can lodge in the tonsils, throat, and larynx and cause major swelling. Cat fight abscesses are another type of abscess that could interfere with vocal cord function. I have had patients with severe abscess in the throat caused by swelling from sewing needles and bones that got lodged in the laryngeal area.
Trauma — Severe injury, both penetrating and non-penetrating can cause swelling that interfere with vocal fold function.
Tumors and Cancer — Benign or malignant tumors can occur in and around the larynx and trachea, and can crowd and cause pressure on normal tissue and cause voice changes or loss

 
Neurological Interference
Decreased or non-stimulation of the nerves to the vocal cords will cause paralysis and voice changes or loss. There are many causes of neurological interference.

Hereditary paralysis — Young dogs of certain breeds are born with abnormalities of the nerves to the larynx. Dalmatians, Bouvier des Flandres, Rottweilers, and white-coated German shepherds can be stricken with laryngeal paralysis at different times of infancy depending on breed.
Breed Acquired paralysis — St. Bernards, Newfounlands, Irish Setters, and Labrador and Golden Retrievers are prone to laryngeal paralysis later in life.
Tumors and cancer — Primary tumors of the nerves that control the vocal cords can cause a loss of stimulation. Non-nerve tissue tumors in the throat, neck, and chest can “pinch” laryngeal nerves and quiet the vocal cords.
Infections — Severe chest infections can cause swelling that also interferes with the nerves to the larynx.
Hypothyroidism in dogs — Hypothyroidism in dogs can affect nerve function, especially to the larynx. I have seen several of these cases during my veterinary career.
Autoimmune conditions — An animal’s own white blood cells can turn on its own nerves, injure the nerve, and limit nerve impulses to the larynx and vocal cords.
Muscle disorders — The vocal cords are a muscle. Autoimmune muscle disorders can block the neuromuscular junction and result in voice change or loss.

 
Unlike us, colds and flus are not the major reason for voice changes and loss in pets. If your dog or cat is losing their bark or meow do not put off a visit to your vet. Many of these conditions are treatable or easily managed.
 
With less treatable conditions, early intervention can lead to a longer, higher quality of life.
 
 

Dr. Ken Tudor
 
 
Image: simmax / Shutterstock
 
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  1
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Meowing Funny 02/03/2015 06:33pm Now I don't feel quite so silly for taking Darlene (RIP) to the doctor for "meowing funny." Although it was nothing and she certainly wasn't losing her voice, I'm glad to know that being a little paranoid about any change isn't a bad thing. Reply to this comment Report abuse 5
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ken-tudor/2015/february/voice-changes-pets-more-serious-you-think-32462#comments TheDailyVet Tue, 03 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32462 at http://www.petmd.com
New Recommendation for Rabies Quarantine http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/new-recommendation-rabies-quarantine-32461









The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets. < Previous Post Next Post > Feb 02, 2015 New Recommendation for Rabies Quarantine by Dr. Jennifer Coates








Save to mypetMDADVERTISEMENT






LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_287458');
When a dog or cat bites a person, veterinarians are part of the team of health care providers who respond. Knowledge of the pet’s rabies vaccination status is critical because that factor can determine whether the pet is euthanized, strictly quarantined for many months at the owner’s expense, or only has to undergo a few weeks of monitoring.
 
Local laws ultimately make that determination, but the Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention and Control holds a lot of sway. This is what it has to say on the matter:
 
 (1) Dogs, cats, and ferrets that have never been vaccinated and are exposed to a rabid animal should be euthanized immediately. If the owner is unwilling to have this done, the animal should be placed in strict isolation for 6 months. Isolation in this context refers to confinement in an enclosure that precludes direct contact with people and other animals…
 
(2) Animals overdue for a booster vaccination should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis based upon severity of exposure, time elapsed since last vaccination, number of previous vaccinations, current health status, and local rabies epidemiology to determine need for euthanasia or immediate revaccination and observation/isolation.
 
(3) Dogs, cats, and ferrets that are currently vaccinated should be revaccinated immediately, kept under the owner’s control, and observed for 45 days…

 
Scenario number two is the most difficult for veterinarians and public health officials. How should we handle a dog who is only a “little” overdue but was definitely bitten by a rabid skunk? What about a “very” overdue cat who is exposed to a bat that is not available for testing? Many times the recommendation is to euthanize pets who are overdue on their rabies vaccination, particularly if owners are reluctant to pay for a six month quarantine.
 
But new research shows that dogs and cats with out-of-date and current rabies vaccinations respond in similar ways to a rabies booster after a potential exposure. The authors of the paper conclude:
 
Thus, we believe that postexposure management of any previously vaccinated dog or cat exposed to a confirmed or suspected rabid animal should be the same, regardless of vaccination status. Specifically, we believe that appropriate postexposure management for dogs and cats with an out-of-date vaccination status is immediate booster vaccination followed by observation for 45 days, rather than euthanasia or quarantine for 6 months. If additional reassurance is needed, titers could be measured prior to and again 5 to 7 days after booster vaccination to determine whether [the appropriate response to the vaccine] has occurred.

 
This research is no excuse for letting your pet’s rabies vaccination lapse, or even worse, for not vaccinating them at all. You really don’t want to be put in the position of arguing for your “overdue” pet’s life after a bite, and the recommendation for euthanasia or a strict (and expensive) six month quarantine for unvaccinated animals still stands.
 

Dr. Jennifer Coates
 
 
References
 
Compendium of animal rabies prevention and control, 2011. National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians, Inc. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2011 Nov 4;60(RR-6):1-17.
 
Comparison of anamnestic responses to rabies vaccination in dogs and cats with current and out-of-date vaccination status. Moore MC, Davis RD, Kang Q, Vahl CI, Wallace RM, Hanlon CA, Mosier DA. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2015 Jan 15;246(2):205-11.
 
 
Image: Mr. SUTTIPON YAKHAM / Shutterstock
< Previous Post Next Post >








Save to mypetMD


Comments  2
Leave Comment
register   |   Login   |   Connect with Facebook
TheOldBroad Titer? 02/02/2015 06:41pm If a pet is overdue for a booster (and shame on those who are lax on this), could a titer be used? Reply to this comment Report abuse 1 Dr. Jennifer Coates 02/03/2015 04:34pm Public health officials don't generally recognize rabies titers. Reply to this comment Report abuse 1
var _CI = _CI || {};
(function() {
var script = document.createElement('script');
ref = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0];
_CI.counter = (_CI.counter) ? _CI.counter + 1 : 1;
document.write('');
script.type = 'text/javascript';
script.src = 'http://widget.crowdignite.com/widgets/32045?_ci_wid=_CI_widget_'+_CI.counter;
script.async = true;
ref.parentNode.insertBefore(script, ref);
})();

#_ci_widget_div_32045{width:auto;max-width:500px;clear:both!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td img{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;height:auto;width:100%!important;background-color: #F5F5F5;border: 1px solid #DDD;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover img{opacity:.8;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table{height:auto;width:100%;border-spacing:0;margin:15px 0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr{clear:both;height:auto;overflow:hidden;width:100%;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td{display:inline-block;margin-left:2%;width:23.2%!important;min-height:200px;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:first-child{margin:0;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div{-webkit-transition:all .2s ease;transition:all .2s ease;border:none;margin-top:10px!important;max-height:48px!important;text-align:left;width:100%!important;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td > div a{-webkit-transition:color linear .05s;transition:color linear .05s;color:#0071a5!important;font-family:PragmaticaCond-Book,sans-serif;font-size:16px!important;font-weight:500;line-height:21px;text-decoration:none;}
#_ci_widget_div_32045 table tr td:hover > div a{color:#171717!important;}
]]>
http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/dr-coates/2015/february/new-recommendation-rabies-quarantine-32461#comments TheDailyVet Mon, 02 Feb 2015 11:00:00 +0000 32461 at http://www.petmd.com