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Written by leading veterinarians to provide you with the information you need to care for your pets.

The Daily Vet by petMD

The Daily Vet is a blog featuring veterinarians from all walks of life. Every week they will tackle entertaining, interesting, and sometimes difficult topics in the world of animal medicine – all in the hopes that their unique insights and personal experiences will help you to understand your pets.

Since its invention in the 1960s, the economical and convenience advantages of dry, kibbled food has made it the most popular method for feeding pets. Due to AAFCO standards, both dry and wet pet foods meet necessary nutritional requirements. So why feed wet if dry is apparently just as good? Actually there are some very good reasons to add wet food to any pet’s diet.

The Taste of Wet Pet Foods

Few dogs and cats will turn down the opportunity to eat wet food. Whether it is a texture preference, an olfactory preference, or taste preference is unknown. Likely it is a combination of all three factors. Many small breed dogs like Chihuahuas are notorious for tiring of dry food and for holding out for “wetter” people food. Their ability to hold out with hunger strikes is quite impressive. Adding wet food to the diet generally resolves this problem and avoids the unbalanced alternative of selective human foods.

Wet Pet Food for Illness

A common presenting complaint for animals brought to veterinary hospitals is that they are not eating. This lack of appetite is always a very strong concern for owners. An easy assessment of the severity of the condition is to offer wet food to the patient. Mildly ill animals invariably scarf the food. The owners are always surprised. My standard response is: “If you were mildly nauseous and someone offered you Shredded Wheat with no milk, would you eat it?”

I see the light bulb go on! With the right treatment and wet food for a few days these animals recover uneventfully.

Wet Pet Food for Weight Control

Dogs readily eat wet food or a combination of wet and dry. By controlling the calories of each meal, preferably two meals per day, owners can avoid free choice feeding. Giving pets access to a constant source of food to graze on is a major contributor to the pet obesity problem that presently exists. Although many dogs will not overeat if fed free choice, they are definitely not in the majority.

Cats are natural grazers, so owners typically free feed dry food because wet food will become dry and crusty if left out. Again, this is a recipe for overweight cats. By offering scheduled small feedings of wet food that are readily eaten, cat owners can reduce the amount of free choice dry food and reduce excess consumption of calories.

Adding canned food has proven to be particularly useful for animals on weight loss diets. The additional water distends the stomach and helps trigger the satiety — the “I’m full” — center of the brain, reducing begging behavior and other “sad” behaviors that cause owners to abandon weight loss in their pets. Research on dieting cats has confirmed this effect.

Wet Pet Food for Urinary Crystals and Stones

Many dogs, and even more cats, habitually produce crystals in their urine that can result in chronic bladder irritation or even stone formation that requires surgical removal. Management of this condition is generally dietary, and, you guessed it, the most popular foods with owners are the dry foods. But research confirms that adding more water to the diet is a much better management strategy.

Additional dietary water creates diluted urine. Crystals and stone formation require concentrated urine. “The solution to pollution is dilution!”

Physically, cats are by nature thirst intolerant. If they do not seek and consume water they make extremely concentrated urine. Feeding a wet food only diet to crystal forming cats helps add water to their diet and manages their condition better.

Many pet owners are reluctant to add wet food due to cost concerns. But if the above advantages are considered as preventives, pet owners can’t afford not to feed wet food to their pets.

All Wet Foods are Not Created Equal

Since it is often difficult to compare which wet foods would be most beneficial to your cat or dog, consult your veterinarian first. Your pet’s doctor can ensure that the wet food you are choosing is complete and balanced for your pet’s specific nutritional, health, and age appropriate needs.

Dr. Ken Tudor

Image: Fotokostic / via Shutterstock

Comments  35

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  • Verrry interesting.....
    03/28/2013 08:23am

    My cat, "Katness Everclean" eats both wet and dry and never bats an eye!

  • Also...
    03/28/2013 10:20am

    Another good reason for using wet food with cats is it can be easier to administer medications. My cat has kidney disease, so each day I crush half a pill and put it in his wet food at dinner time. All other times of the day he has access to dry food. Because he was underweight when diagnosed, I don't worry about over-feeding with the dry food. My other cat however has a weight issue and I agree that the wet food will make him full and he eats less of the dry that's available.

  • 03/28/2013 05:20pm

    When meds were needed, I always found putting them in small gelatin capsules to be far more effective than putting them in food. You may put the cat off eating if it does taste anything amiss, and you can't be guaranteed of the dosage consumed when it is added to food.

  • 04/04/2013 11:02am

    My cats will not eat anything in a gelatin capsule; I've been doing it this way for a very long time with no problems...the pill is ground up and mixed in with the food, the cat doesn't taste the pill at all. But I'm glad that the gelatin capsule works for you.

  • 04/04/2013 11:17am

    Also in regards to dosage in his food - my cat was diagnosed with kidney disease and since I've been giving him his meds in his food his urea levels have gone down to normal. The dosage seems to be just fine.

  • Good, But
    03/28/2013 11:54am

    Cats are NOT natural grazers. This is a myth perpetuated by the dry food makers. Cats are crepuscular, hunting and eating mainly in the margins of the day. They do not graze and only rarely eat outside of the early early light and last light. We train our cats and fosters and socialized ferals to eat at our schedules. Claiming that cats are grazers only convinces dry feeders to continue to keep the bowl of cattle feed out at all times.

    I counter dry feeders when they claim that their cats lived to be 45 years old and never sick a day and never ate anything but cereal (dry food): The reporter asked the new centenarian what his secrets for a long life are. The old fellow replied: " booze, cigars, and sexual conquests." Does this mean that these are good for all of us? Nope, it means that the centenarian has a constitution resistant to poor habits. It's the same with cats and dogs.

    Thank you for pressing the need for a wet diet. It's done my own a power of good.

  • 03/28/2013 05:30pm

    Cats ARE grazers: http://tinyurl.com/3y7c55n See the references attached to Chapter 2, second column, first paragraph. If your information is better, please please provide the reference material?

  • 03/28/2013 09:45pm

    Sorry, but that information is incorrect, as it is based on laboratory observations placing animals in unnatural conditions which effectively preclude natural behaviours. I could, if I wanted, make my argument using many of the same citations as your study, plus actual field experience, which your report admittedly lacked.

    Over 50 years of field work are better by far than a few instances of lab observation.

  • 03/30/2013 05:16pm

    Eleni, why would you be sorry? If the Mugford/Kane type of papers are an issue for you, and you prefer "in the field" type of observations, then your needs are easy to address. For example, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1017/S0952836905006771/abstract has data showing that over 88% of a feral/stray's diet outdoors is prey that weighs in at 50 grams or less, (under 2 ounces). These cats are constantly on the move looking for their next meal, which constitutes grazing in my book. Perhaps you would use a different term?

    As you have so much "in the field" experience you must be aware that cats are constantly chasing bugs, dragon flies, small rodents, etc., and in real life they do "graze" for want of a better term.

    Anyone with any accredited training in nutrition will also be able to point out that infrequent, large meals as served with canned only diets will stretch the stomach of any living thing, including a cat. As we have already altered gastrointestinal hormones to a major extent with gonadectomies, portion control becomes a big concern. Even more so with cats that have such short digestive tracts and less colonic area for absorbing nutrients for good health.

    Personally I am much happier, with my nutritional background, in feeding foods that allow cats to eat just a few crunchies at a snack, keeping the stomach small as it is in the wild. Constant little meals allow for much better stability in glucose levels, too, and I avoid high fat foods as they are the ones that cause insulin resistance.

    Before high protein was being promoted for feline diabetes maintenance, the trend was high fiber, and just because we now know that high proteion is the first priority, that doesn't dismiss the value of the previously valued fiber in pet foods. "Fiber" is a form of carbohydrate and I much prefer to worry about the use of "simple" carbohydrates that do contribute to creation of fat cells and disease in our sedentary house pets. We give canned 'treats' to those cats willing to eat them, but find that our healthy cats prefer to snack on dry food to the point that the two new Siamese purebreds we took in won't touch canned.

    What counts is the ingredient content in the food, not how it was processed, and looking at a study on "canned" foods that show one to be better than another does nothing to compare equal ingredient foods prepared as dry food. That just doesn't make sense to anyone who can think this through clearly.

  • 04/21/2013 04:23pm

    Quote: "Anyone with any accredited training in nutrition will also be able to point out that infrequent, large meals as served with canned only diets will stretch the stomach of any living thing, including cats"

    Too much FIBER in the diet can BULK UP and STRETCH the GI tract in cats; in some cases I've read too much fiber can contribute to mega-colon. A little fiber wouldn't hurt, but too much all the time can. The high fiber idea for feline diabetics was a human diabetic recommendation to begin with. Cats aren't the same species and we can't just transfer something from humans to cats or dogs. The higher fiber thing is beneficial for diabetic humans/omnivores, especially, because they are more prone to eat items with more sugar (of course including savory things like various forms of carbs), and this is where fiber is helpful; if cats aren't consuming much of carb (ultimately sugar), then the fiber thing wouldn't be as beneficial for diabetic cats. I've seen no mention (other than here) of the issue of "early menopause" because of neutering being such an important consideration. And anyway, too much carbohydrate can cause fat increase and weight gain, with carbs probably contributing more so to weight gain than consuming "fat". Of course, if a cat eats too much (and too much fat) and doesn't move around much, this can cause weight gain and excess fat in the cells can contribute to insulin resistance, but it's not all about dietary fat (especially with felines) . Too much carb = stored fat. The "low fat" theories are being questioned in humans now and it really shouldn't have even been transferred over to cats anyway.

  • 04/21/2013 07:56pm

    http://www.felineconstipation.org High fiber diets were being recommended for controlling feline diabetes before high protein diets were available for a reason -- they HELPED control and reduce blood sugar levels. High fiber = complex carbohydrate. It should be common sense that AFTER high protein as an ingredient, having high fiber, (complex carbohydrates). in the food would also be a plus, as it is with all diabetic patients in any species. I am not sure where you are getting your information regarding fermentable fibers, bud do suggest that you might want to ask for your money back as it is quickly becoming common knowledge that "pre-biotics" or fiber are important for gut health. That is why veterinarians are now selling products such as Pro Pectalin, FortiFlora, and others.

    And just to be clear, I am writing this to help those on the website who are interested in what I say to understand. I do realize that some people are always right.

  • 04/24/2013 01:30pm

    Quote from westcoastsyrinx: "...I am not sure where you are getting your information regarding fermentable fibers, bud do suggest that you might want to ask for your money back as it is quickly becoming common knowledge that "pre-biotics" or fiber are important for gut health. That is why veterinarians are now selling products such as Pro Pectalin, FortiFlora, and others.
    And just to be clear, I am writing this to help those on the website who are interested in what I say to understand." end quote

    Let's be clear so others can understand. Products such as Pro Pectalin and Fortiflora sold by veterinarians are PRObiotics, they are NOT PREbiotics. You can't interchange probiotics and prebiotics. With all your claims about having a nutritional background (obviously human nutrition and how many years ago was that?) and knowledge about feline nutrition, you are wrong once again.

    PREbiotics (in the food) could possibly have some benefit (same with probiotics), but they can be also problematic: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/07/12/dietary-fiber-in-processed-pet-food.aspx

    Not enough research has been done with prebiotics with cats and dogs, and again, we can't just transfer over ideas from research done on humans.

    "Westcoastsyrinx", it seems your ego is heavily invested in high fiber diets for feline diabetes for some reason. To the extent that you need to trash and malign well-respected veterinarians who are doing much to help our wonderful cats. All your misinformation, half-truths and fabrications (lies) are detrimental to people reading here and trying to glean real information to help their pets.

    And while it seems you like to post links to "studies" to prove your ideas, I'm sure you never bothered to look at this one (or just ignored it "la,la,la,la,la): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16275041?dopt=AbstractPlus

    "...There was no significant difference in the initial or final mean body weights or in the mean change in body weight from week 0 to week 16 between dietary groups. Diabetic cats in this study were SIGNIFICANTLY more likely to revert to a non-insulin-dependent state when fed the canned LC-LF (low carb, low fiber) food versus the MC-HF (moderate carb, high fiber) food."

    There are other studies which show the same thing, this is just one.


    Dr. Tudor and petmd.com, I am not meaning to stir up negativity here with my comments. I don't enjoy it, but I needed to address the twisted comments and "misinformation" (putting it kindly) from "westcoastsyrinx". It was very upsetting to read some of the comments about feline diabetes knowing what I experienced with my cat (who was the most magical and beloved cat I've ever had or known) and what I've seen with so many other cats. This is why I'm responding.

    This quote seems to apply here: "It would be funny, if it weren't so sad."

  • 04/24/2013 03:21pm

    jenzia wrote:
    Let's be clear so others can understand. Products such as Pro Pectalin and Fortiflora sold by veterinarians are PRObiotics, they are NOT PREbiotics. You can't interchange probiotics and prebiotics. With all your claims about having a nutritional background (obviously human nutrition and how many years ago was that?) and knowledge about feline nutrition, you are wrong once again.
    Yes your statement is right. AND as that statement has demonstrated that you understand the terminology, it follows that you must also know prebiotics and probiotics are BOTH integral contributors to gut health for any animal.

    PREbiotics (in the food) could possibly have some benefit (same with probiotics), but they can be also problematic. Yes again, if the wrong prebiotics, (aka fermentable fiber, aka, complex CARBOHYDRATE), are fed, such as guar gum, they CAN cause food to pass through the colon too fast for the body to have time to assimilate the nutrients passing through.

    Not enough research has been done with prebiotics with cats and dogs, and again, we can't just transfer over ideas from research done on humans.
    Not so much truth in this statement. And this is where anyone, such as yourself, with understanding of gut bacteria, should be able to distinguish between people who make statements based upon good scientific data and those that aren't. AND anyone who has been around since about 1996 will have had easy access to the works published by Reinhart, Sunvold, Buddington, and others, with "In Vitro Fermentation as a Predictor of Fiber Utilization" being the most widely cited article of the time such as in this was the paper that produced a chart applicable to both dog and cat gut health. Here is one such paper published around that time: http://www.animal-science.org/content/73/4/1099.full.pdf+html Quote: " Implications: Results of fiber fermentation as evaluated in vitro can be used to reasonably predict in vivo fiber utilization responses by dogs. Sources of fiber that are moderately fermentable, such as beet pulp, promote gastrointestinal tract health while maintaining excellent stool characteristics and nutrient digestibility. Highly fermentable fibers, such as citrus pectin, locust bean gum, and carob bean gum, may cause undesirable stool characteristics."

    "Westcoastsyrinx", it seems your ego is heavily invested in high fiber diets for feline diabetes for some reason. (RUDENESS!) To the extent that you need to trash and malign well-respected veterinarians who are doing much to help our wonderful cats.
    That is YOUR choice to provide veterinarians with unsupportable respect, but forgive me for wanting more scientific data for what I choose to use on our charges here, and recommend to owners who have diabetic cats that last for many years after going into remission WITHOUT secondary diseases that shorten life span. Here, Dr Tudor doesn't have a ton of training in nutrition, either, but he is far more up to date on the factual information that is out there than the people being quoted in your postings who are all not keeping up with their journal reading because they know it all with factual data to give us for support.
    All your misinformation, half-truths and fabrications (lies) are detrimental to people reading here and trying to glean real information to help their pets.
    I am glad you think that way as it means you value accuracy and therefore should be able to also provide scientific data sources as I have done. It might have helped you a little to read the information at the URL's I provided in earlier posts.

    And while it seems you like to post links to "studies" to prove your ideas, I'm sure you never bothered to look at this one (or just ignored it "la,la,la,la,la) (Childish): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16275041?dopt=AbstractPlus
    Yes, in fact, I have read that paper and aside from the fact that both ingredient lists are so much rubbish and not conducive to long term feline health, the study was very short term, not showing the long term results of such a "diet". Within the 16 weeks the cats' guts would hardly have had time to adjust the bacteria to fit with the new ingredients, and therefore this wouldn't be relevent to fermentable fiber effects on a cat. While both foods were "canned" there was no equivalent quality dry food with the appropriate fermentable fiber compared, and yet this silly time waster is often used by people who want to believe that canned is better tahn dry, no matter the ingredient list. I actually went to the trouble of purchasing the paper to ensure that I wasn't missing important information in my assessment. The study clearly had an agenda and was very selective in its criteria to prove a specific point decided before hand.
    Dr. Tudor and petmd.com, I am not meaning to stir up negativity here with my comments.
    "You" statements are always confrontational jenzia .
    It was very upsetting to read some of the comments about feline diabetes knowing what I experienced with my cat
    As we lost three cats and a dog within the past year with diseases they had before coming to us, I sincerely do not want to make you feel any worse. However, as diabetes doesn't kill, and the secondary diseases that develop do kill, I think you might want to be directing your angst at those whose advice you were following if your cat didn't live to a normal ripe old age into the 20's as those on my feline diabetes groups do.

  • 04/24/2013 04:16pm

    "I sincerely do not want to make you feel any worse. However, as diabetes doesn't kill, and the secondary diseases that develop do kill, I think YOU might want to be directing your angst at those whose advice you were following if your cat didn't live to a normal ripe old age into the 20's as those on my feline diabetes groups do..."

    Hi 'Pat', I'm aware of who are you, I've seen you post your rubbish elsewhere (such as on a blog from a YDC/FDMB friend who writes about feline health).

    You are using those "you" statements again in your comments. LOL.

    I've held back here a bit previously, but I must say, YOU really seem to have some mental health issues. I've pointed out just a number of lies and fabrications I found you've posted here in these comments. I really think you should consider getting some help (mental health that is). Sorry, I wouldn't trust much of anything you say, so I would highly doubt what you say about your high fiber feline diabetic yahoo group and about the study above.

    Now about my precious boy....Obviously, you know nothing about what happened to my cat. It had nothing to do with secondary disease from diabetes (what are those secondary diseases, BTW? Heart issues?). He had been off insulin for a couple years anyway, btw. That statement really tops the sickness meter for your comments by trying to tell me what happened with my cat and his kidney disease was because of the choices I made to treat his treat his diabetes (successfully, and which is fully recognized by veterinarians and vet med now). It's too bad Dr. Tudor or another vet doesn't address your misinformation and lies here, but I'm sure he doesn't have time for that. For a moment I felt outrage at your comment about what happened with my sweet boy, but now I just feel sadness and disgust as to why a human being becomes so warped and focused on negativity and wastes energy this way. And twists truth to feed their ego.

    I truly hope you can look at what you are doing here and elsewhere. You have lied. PERIOD. And you are creating disharmony and negativity here and elsewhere simply because of your ego needs to be right. It's got to be a stressful way to live. Let it go. With all that is going on in the world (and what happened in the US this past week), do you really need to create more negativity to prove your ideas about feline nutrition? If you like high fiber diets, fine. Just don't perpetuate lies and half-truths about feline diabetes, Dr. Hodgkins, Dr. PIerson, and all the FDMB and YDC cats who have gotten off insulin and are doing great.

    Wishing you mental health, peace and healing,
    JenZ

  • Diabetic cats and carbs
    03/28/2013 12:10pm

    Wet food with low carbs can help your cat's blood sugar levels. A great many cats are DIET CONTROLLED diabetics when switched from dry food to wet food.
    Also, cats are not big drinkers, so wet food gives many the moisture they need.
    The worst wet food is better than the best dry food for your diabetic cat.
    You can find a wealth of nutrition info on Dr. Lisa Pierson's site catinfo.org on the benefits of wet food over dry.

  • 03/28/2013 02:52pm

    Thank you for mentioning Dr. Lisa. She turned my feeding program on it's head for my cats. Maybe someday I'll make my own.

  • 03/28/2013 05:25pm

    Dr Lisa has absolutely no training in nutrition, let alone training or upgrading in feline nutrition and she has no scientific data to back her statements. The only credible source she has is Deb Zoran and she is using a very outdated article Deb wrote before the studies came out discussing the fact that cats are, as she termed it "dropped into menopause" when altered, and need different nutrition as sedentary house cats.

    I recommend to anyone who really cares for their animal to always look at the scientific data behind what anyone says, to ensure it isn't just outdated dogma. And also check the credentials of the person speaking to ensure that they have upgraded their education.

  • 04/01/2013 11:01am

    Most veterinarians have no training in nutrition. Most curriculums for veterinarians require one or perhaps two classes in nutrition, and it is usually a general class. After that, most vets rely on what pet food companies tell them about food, which is a lot like believing a used car salesman. Dr. Lisa Pierson is following the guidelines Dr. Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM introduced in her book Your Cat: Simple New Secrets for a Longer, Stronger Life. Dr. Hodgkins IS trained in nutrition, having worked many years for a food company, and is a patent holder on a diabetic management food.

    In my experience of following Dr. Hodgkins' guidelines, I'm comfortable that she has the right of it. AAFCO requires that the food be something the cat can survive on for 6 months. It isn't a method of choosing a food that will provide the best long term health. Regardless of the contents, dry food will not provide the longevity that canned or raw food will.

  • 04/01/2013 03:02pm

    "Dr. Hodgkins IS trained in nutrition, having worked many years for a food company, and is a patent holder on a diabetic management food. "

    You are misinformed. Dr Hodgkins has NO training in companion animal nutrition. Check her credentials. She got a legal degree before writing her book and the only nutritional training that was around when she got her veterinary degree was related to livestock, not companion animals.

    There is no *credible* reference material attached to Hodgkins' writings, or Lisa Pierson's other than what was written by Deb Zoran. Deb Zoran's original material was written before she modified her opinions based upon research released after she wrote her first article. It is being circulated by people who aren't educated in the fact that our sedentary house cats were, as Deb put it, "dropped into menopause" when they had gonadectomies. Neither Hodgkins or Pierson can admit that Deb's writing has been updated because the new information doesn't support their unscientific agendas.

    Both Elizabeth Hodgkins and Lisa Pierson started out on my Yahoo group, and learned anything they did from there, as I DO have training in nutrition. However, neither of them wanted to take in the fact that before "high protein" became the trend for feeding diabetic cats, "high fiber" foods were recommended as working better than other formulas -- for a reason. Neither of them could understand that while "high protein" was definitely the right focus, "high fiber" was a better secondary choice for maintaining an insulin free diabetic than high fat canned foods that have been causing the cats from Elizabeth Hodgkins group to end up on the feline heart group at Yahoo. Over the years, as science has provided me with new material for my group, Pierson and Hodgkins have also modified what they write as long as it still fits with their original agendas. The only supporting arguments they have are each other's writings.

    As fat is scienfitically known to block glucose receptors on cell surfaces, FEWER, (only 10%), of Hodgkins' group's cats managed to drop the need for insulin, which is a very low statistic. Most cats should manage to drop insulin use if weight goes down, but if the decrease is artificial, (not feeding enough nutrition) then there are other long term consecquences that aren't addressed by either Hodgkins or Pierson.

    Anyone can buy a patent. It means nothing regarding credential integrity.

  • 04/01/2013 03:13pm

    Well! You're certainly impressed with yourself! You'll have to excuse me for taking Dr. Hodgkins' experience working for a company to develop cat food over your self-aggrandization.

  • 04/01/2013 03:40pm

    http://www.diabeticcathelp.com/COK/Credentials%2011.htm
    "This patent and research led to the introduction in June, 2001, of a new ethical feline diabetes management food by one of the world’s largest pet food companies."

    Hodgkins was a writer, always has been - not a nutritional expert - and she sure puts a nice spin on her stint with Heska. NO nutritional training in the credentials above, so where do you think she would get the expertise to create a pet food? Out of a cook book, maybe?

    One more time, the formula she tried to create was rejected and she is capitalizing on the fact that other companies, including the one she worked for, did come up with formulas as recommended by scientific papers. No one, to my knowledge, is paying fees to Hodgkins for this privilege, which they would have to do if her patented formula had been used.

  • 04/01/2013 05:37pm

    So defensive! You sound jealous. I'm happy with the choices I've made in regard to my cats.

  • 04/21/2013 04:46pm

    Dr. Hodgkins created the food (which became Purina DM for which she for a patent) from the experience she had with her own diabetic cat, Punkin (did you read the book or the site?). She first tried the conventional veterinary ideas (such as low fiber dry veterinary diets) and it didn't work for her beloved cat. She then started feeding him differently (more species appropriately) and his diabetes resolved; that is where her ideas about diabetes started.

    When I was involved on the YDC forum, Dr. Hodgkins said she DOES receive a small compensation for DM. Though she receives income (small amount) through the sale of the food, she generally recommended other brands, and most recommended properly prepared/balanced raw or home-prepared food.

  • 04/21/2013 05:07pm

    Meant to say..."for which she got a patent". Sorry for the typos (posting when upset = typos).

  • 04/21/2013 07:40pm

    Anyone with good education will understand that Dr Hodgkins PURCHASED the patent and know that it doesn't lend credibility or merit to her ideas. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/patent

  • 04/21/2013 10:05pm

    Okaay...? She purchased a patent? NO, Purina purchased the rights from her. How do you purchase a patent anyway? Perhaps there is a fee? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lie?s=t

    "...In 2001, Dr. Hodgkins was awarded a US and international patent for a novel and highly successful approach to managing feline diabetes..." Source: Your Cat, St. Martin's Press, NY NY

    "In 2001 Hodgkins received a U.S. patent on her canned food formula, which Purina purchased and launched as DM, its Diabetes Management brand, in 2002. The results of her investigation, which were included in her patent application, were also published in Veterinary Therapeutics in 2001. She was taken aback when Purina launched a dry version of DM, about a year later after the canned version." Source: Veterinary Practice News
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/delusional?s=t


    I'm not sure what your issue is with feline diabetes and trashing Dr. Hodgkins, Dr. Pierson and all the cats who have gotten better and don't have to be injected with insulin any longer. I've pointed out your other fabrications and I think that says enough. Get some help...

    Sorry if this shows up twice. I'm trying to respond to a specific comment above.

  • 04/21/2013 03:31pm

    Quote from westcoastsyrinx...." FEWER, (only 10%), of Hodgkins' group's cats managed to drop the need for insulin, which is a very low statistic...."

    That is completely untrue....i.e. a lie.
    I was involved on Dr. Hodgkin’s forum from 2006 - 2009 (when Dr. H was still involved there on YDC) and a majority of cats did achieve remission - some very quickly, and some took longer. On YDC (Dr. H’s site), they stated that approximately 80 - 85% of cats achieve remission using her methods, but I think it’s more like 70%, perhaps a little more. When I was there they had OTJ (off the juice) celebrations all the time. Many cats (probably a majority now that there is more info about feline diabetes and diet available) are able to achieve remission simply with insulin and change in diet, even without being so tightly regulated as Dr. H recommends ANYWAY, so saying that less than 10% went off insulin is just ridiculous. Same thing on the Feline Diabetes Message Board (FDMB) where Dr. Lisa Pierson has been involved. Go there and see hundreds and hundreds of cats that have gone off insulin there too - and even more now that they have been actively advocating tighter regulation in the last few years. And, of course, also always advocating low carb, wet food (low carb canned, or balanced raw or home-prepared) and getting off dry and certainly not promoting the old high fiber dry food on FDMB. My cat went off insulin after a couple years; he took longer because I stupidly didn’t start insulin right away (for months), thinking the new diet info I discovered would be enough for him. I didn’t think it would happen for him, but his pancreas did start working again (feeding canned and raw food and TR).

    Quote from westcoastsyrinx:...."high fat canned foods that have been causing the cats from Elizabeth Hodgkins group to end up on the feline heart group at Yahoo..."

    Seriously? Any references for that? As I said, I've been involved with both YDC and the FDMB, and I've NEVER heard of anything remotely related to this. It's nonsense. Feline heart issues are mostly related to muscle disfunction (such as cardiomyopathy or murmurs) and sometimes related to other diseases or organ disfunction (like CKD and hypertension) and can often be idiopathic or genetic. It sounds like you're saying that supposedly higher fat in canned food creates heart disease in cats just like it's supposed to in humans? Cats don't develop heart disease like people do, and even the saturated fat=heart disease theory in humans is being questioned now. BTW, the food Dr. H recommended, and the YDC cats often used, was Fancy Feast (the gluten-free varieties) and it's not any super high fat food anyway; she didn't recommended Wellness (because of all the veggies and fruit) which apparently is a little higher in fat. A lot of FDMB cats used Wellness though with good success.

    I could see the cats eating the old high fiber dry diabetic food ending up over at the yahoo feline IBD group because of excess fiber and starch in the diet. Could also see them over at the yahoo CRF group because BG levels aren't well-regulated (too much carb) and high BG can cause renal damage.

    Petmd.com, this poster is fabricating things left and right here. I'm not sure what the agenda is, but it's upsetting to see this. Sorry if this had negative tone, just had to respond to this.

  • 03/30/2013 03:55am

    When our 15-year old cat began to develop diabetes, our vet suggested that we try feeding her wet food because (1) cats need REAL meat, not a lot of grain and (2) she had read of cases where such a change in diet had reversed a cat's diabetes.

    We changed our cat's diet as recommended, from dry kibble to canned wet food, while monitoring her blood sugar and giving her insulin injections. After a couple months on wet food, the diabetes disappeared -- her blood sugar levels were normal and we were able to cease giving her injections.

    This was a couple years ago; the diabetes has not returned.

  • 03/30/2013 06:51pm

    Gayle, it depends upon whether you are talking about simple carbohydrates, (starches and flours), as opposed to complex carbohydrates that were promoted in the past as the best ingredients for our diabetic cats for a reason. Good fermentable fiber and fiber as fillers is better than providing food with high fat content as fat blocks cell receptors causing a higher need for insulin to compensate. I understand that you also deal with acromegaly and fat content in the food is doubly important for those cats, IMHO.

    Canned foods are promoted because of studies done comparing specific canned foods with different ingredient lists. There has never been a study done comparing an equally good dry food, or if you know of one I don't, I really would appreciate hearing about it. One sometimes has to pay for the full transcript of a paper, rather than an abstract, to get the full story.

    For example, I have seen a number of cats in one group where the owners were raving that the cats had stopped using insulin. Unfortunately the high fat content in the canned foods had caused the need for those cats to turn to heart medication to maintain life, and often owners reported losing the cats within two or three years after going into remission. You don't see the long term effects of most recommended trends in feeding cats on line, so you need to search out facts for yourself.

    Personally, we did just fine on a low fat, moderate carb, high protein dry food that our diabetic cat grazed on for over a decade -- free from the need for insulin -- until old age took him with a collapsed larynx. The RIGHT ingredients in dry foods can work just as well.

  • 04/21/2013 06:22pm

    Quote from westcoastsyrinx:...."For example, I have seen a number of cats in one group where the owners were raving that the cats had stopped using insulin. Unfortunately the high fat content in the canned foods had caused the need for those cats to turn to heart medication to maintain life, and often owners reported losing the cats within two or three years after going into remission..."

    What were those heart conditions where the cats ended up needing medication for life? Do you even know anything about feline heart problems? The most common heart conditions are cardiomyopathy and also murmurs, and there is not a diet connection as far a I know (although lack of taurine could be a problem, but most foods are now supplemented and also sodium may be an issue). For one thing, cats don't get the same heart conditions as humans. As I said previously, it sounds like you're trying to transfer over the idea of human heart disease to cats. That being animal fat = heart disease for humans. That is bogus. As I said above, I've been involved in two popular online feline diabetes forums (YDC/Yourdiabeticcat.com and FDMB/the feline diabetes message board) and I've NEVER heard a claim that diabetic cats in remission end up with some heart issue because of eating canned food.

    BTW, most diabetic cats are older when they are diagnosed. Sadly, cats don't have long life spans and some do pass away a few years later (usually from other issues, and typically not heart related). My beloved cat was diabetic and went into remission and it was heart breaking when he died at 18+ years of CKD. I feel the high BG levels could contributed to his kidney problems (renal damage). I'm angry that I didn't get good nutrition information from vets years ago (the old vet thought high carb dry food was fine even when I mentioned I vaguely heard about the benefits of wet food).

  • Wet Food
    03/28/2013 02:51pm

    Thank you Dr. Tudor for a very insightful article. I am constantly bombarding my friends with the pros of wet vs dry for both their dogs and cats. My FC has not had dry food for over a year and I wish I knew then, what I know now.... He now eats Honest Kitchen that I add cooked chicken thighs. Gus also gets a raw meaty bone in the morning and in the evening.

    Slowly (kicking and hissing) the 4 cats are getting used to dining on limited amounts of dry food. I am offering Wysongs Epigen(?). I offer only one small bowl a day and when it's gone that's it for the day. The cats also eat Wellness chicken and turkey wet food as well as chicken. I am going to try the Wysong's wet cat food when the current case is finished.

  • Wet Food
    03/29/2013 06:01pm

    I add warm water to wet food. It not only makes "gravy" that they love, they take in more water and I believe that the warm water makes it more aromatic so they're more enthusiastic about eating.

  • Heated comments
    04/01/2013 05:16pm

    It's really not that pleasant to 'read' the heat behind some of these comments. Can we be civil and polite, please?

  • 04/21/2013 09:58pm

    Okaay...? She purchased a patent? NO, Purina purchased the rights from her. How do you purchase a patent anyway? Perhaps there is a fee? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/lie?s=t

    "...In 2001, Dr. Hodgkins was awarded a US and international patent for a novel and highly successful approach to managing feline diabetes..." Source: Your Cat, St. Martin's Press, NY NY

    "In 2001 Hodgkins received a U.S. patent on her canned food formula, which Purina purchased and launched as DM, its Diabetes Management brand, in 2002. The results of her investigation, which were included in her patent application, were also published in Veterinary Therapeutics in 2001. She was taken aback when Purina launched a dry version of DM, about a year later after the canned version." Source: Veterinary Practice News
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/delusional?s=t


    I'm not sure what your issue is with feline diabetes and trashing Dr. Hodgkins, Dr. Pierson and all the cats who have gotten better and don't have to be injected with insulin any longer. I've pointed out your other fabrications and I think that says enough. Get some help...



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