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Your dog's nutrition is important for a healthy & happy life. petMD experts help you to know what to feed your dog, how much food to feed, and the differences in dog foods, so your dog gets optimum nutrition.
Nutrition Nuggets is the newest offshoot of petMD's Dog Nutrition Center. Each week Dr. Coates will use her expertise and wisdom to blog about the intricacies of dog nutrition.

Helping Dogs Lose Weight - There is a Better Way

January 29, 2016 / (1) comments

The latest results of the National Pet Obesity Awareness Day Survey are depressing. It estimated that

  • 17.6% of US dogs (13.9 million individuals) are obese (a body condition score of 5 out of 5)
  • 35.1 % of US dogs (29.9 million individuals) are overweight (a body condition score of 4 out of 5)

 

In other words, over half of the dogs in the United States are overweight or obese.

 

Owners of overweight dogs often wonder about the best way to help them lose weight and regain their health. A new study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association reveals that combining a “dietary weight loss program” with a “controlled exercise plan” helps dogs lose weight while preventing a loss of lean body mass. In and of itself, these results aren’t that surprising, but the details are quite interesting.

 

Overweight, sedentary dogs were recruited by advertisement in local newspapers, by distribution of pamphlets at the University Hospital for Companion Animals at the University of Copenhagen, and by referral from local veterinary clinics. Dogs eligible for inclusion were medium- to large-breed dogs (body weight, 15 to 55 kg [33 to 121 lb]) and 2 to 13 years of age with a BCS ≥ 6 on a 9-point scale.

 

Following enrollment in the 12-week weight loss program, dogs were assigned to the FD [fitness and diet] group or the DO [diet only] group solely on the basis of owner preference. Dogs in the FD group were exercised 3 times/wk at the university hospital [The general exercise protocol consisted of 30 minutes on the underwater treadmill and 30 minutes on the land-based treadmill], and owners were encouraged to increase each dog's daily activity level at home. Owners of dogs in the DO group were instructed not to change their dog's daily exercise routines during the study period, but that any spontaneous increase in the dog's activity should not be restricted.

 

During the study period, all dogs were fed a commercial low-fat, high-protein, dry diet…. The aim was to achieve a weight loss rate of approximately 1.5%/wk. The dogs were weighed every other week, at which time compliance with the feeding plan was discussed with the owner, and if weight loss was < 1% or > 2%, the dog's daily feeding allowance was adjusted (increased or decreased) by 10%.

 

Here are the results:

  • Mean weight loss was 13.9% in the fitness and diet group.
  • Mean weight loss was 12.9% in the diet only group.

 

Not a big difference, right? But the fitness and diet group maintained their lean body mass while it declined in the diet only group. The take home message here is that diet is the key to weight loss in dogs, but exercise combined with diet will help them lose fat rather than muscle, and isn’t that our real goal?

 

 

Dr. Jennifer Coates

 

 

Reference

 

Integration of a physical training program in a weight loss plan for overweight pet dogs. Vitger AD, Stallknecht BM, Nielsen DH, Bjornvad CR. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2016 Jan 15;248(2):174-82.

 

Comments  1

Leave Comment
  • Overfeeding
    01/29/2016 04:48pm

    Most likely probably the most apparent and well-known trigger of [url=https://dog-treatment.net/what-would-be-the-causes-of-obesity-in-dogs/]canine obesity[/url] is overfeeding. The dog owner is not conscious from the wholesome and correct meal portions that ought to become provided to a dog and how often they’re provided. It's so easy to serve up a little extra for the dog and not think it’ll do any harm, but this habit becomes the norm and much more than time will add weight for the dog. Some dog owners also feed their pooch as and as soon as they please, which could exceed the normal two meal every day recommendation. Specific exceptions like obtaining puppies or maybe a pregnant or lactating bitch may require numerous meal portions along with a rise inside the quantity of meals every day. But as a typical rule and unless advised otherwise by your vet, you have to stick with 1 meal inside the morning and 1 meal inside the evening.

    Dogs possess a tendency to beg their way into their owner’s hearts. This could lead to owners supplying in towards the soulful eyes and feeding their dog anytime they sulk or beg for meals. Try to not give in unless you are told otherwise for healthcare elements and within the occasion you suspect a problem with diet plan strategy, get in touch together with your vet straight away.
    Regards
    Peter

 



ABOUT NUTRITION NUGGETS

JENNIFER COATES, DVM

Photo of Jennifer

... graduated with honors from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in 1999. In the years since, she has practiced veterinary medicine in Virginia, Wyoming, and Colorado. She is the author of several books about veterinary medicine and animal care, including the Dictionary of Veterinary Terms, Vet-Speak Deciphered for the Non-Veterinarian .

Jennifer also writes short stories that focus on the strength and importance of the human-animal bond and freelance articles relating to a variety of animal care and veterinary topics. Dr. Coates lives in Fort Collins, Colorado with her husband, daughter, and pets.


 
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