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Q. What can I do to make my puppy stop vomiting her food? I have taken her to different pet clinics but she still vomiting. What could it be?

Answered By
ANGEL ALVARADO

A. Recheck with your veterinarian. Submit a stool sample to diagnose or rule out intestinal parasites which can cause vomiting. If she is a fast eater, slow down her eating by dividing meals or by placing large stones in the bowl for her to eat around. Elevating her bowls may also help. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, transition slowly to the regular diet. If not, see your veterinarian. Abdominal xrays or advanced imaging may be indicated.

Answered By
LINDSEY EDWARDS MVB, BSC, IVCA

A. There are many reasons a young puppy could be frequently vomiting, I assume she has been treated for worms and other parasites and is not running a fever or infection if she has been checked already and that you have taken steps to ensure she eats her food slowly to prevent gulping of too much food and air. If she is spitting her food up soon after eating and without any yellow bile I would be concerned about a problem with her gullet. If she is actively vomiting with bile within hours of eating I would be concerned about a partial obstruction which may require specialist scans or x-rays or a sensitivity to food - I would try a canned hydrolyzed diet fed in small spoonfuls regularly. She should also have bloods run to rule out kidney and liver issues which may be causing nausea, if these have not been done already. She may require referral to a specialist hospital or university clinic


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