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Q. Why does my dog eat grass?

Answered By
COURTNEY CONNORS

A. As another user mentioned, dogs can eat grass when they want to vomit. Sometimes, when a dog has an upset tummy, they will eat grass. If you notice your dog eating grass frantically, you can assume vomiting will shortly follow. Grass does not digest and pass normally. If your dog eats too much grass, it can cause serious issues with pooping. Your dogs poop can end up all tangled inside of her, and it can need veterinary assistance to remove it. The same goes for celery, so avoid feeding celery to your dog.

The other day my boyfriend accidentally left the laundry room door open where we were keeping the trash that was filled with cooked chicken bones. She ate one of the chicken bones lightning fast. We had to induce vomiting by feeding her some hydrogen peroxide. After we had fed her the peroxide, she immediately began frantically eating grass because her tummy was upset.

If there is something lacking in your dogs diet, it could be that your dog is eating grass to make up for it. I am sure that my dogs diet is extremely well balanced (I do not only feed her an air-dried raw food-type diet (Ziwipeak), but a wide variety of safe, healthy foods), so when she eats grass, I know that it is because she has an upset tummy.

That is why I think it is important making sure your dog has a very well balanced diet. If your dog is on a low quality kibble, your dog may be trying to let you know by eating grass (or eating poop).

Answered By
TOMASZ WNUK

A. Dogs eat grass when they want to stimulate gastro-intestinal tract, when they don't have enough fibre in the diet or when they want to vomit. It is considered to be normal behaviour unless dogs take it to extreme.

Answered By
CLAUDIA FIORAVANTI

A. There has been much speculation as to the cause, but we still don' t have a definitive answer. Some claim that it is secondary to a lack of vitamins and minerals in the dog' s diet. However most diets contain lots of plants derivatives so it is very unlikely that they lack in the diet. Other experts claim that grass is eaten in order to relief a stomach upset, but this theory remains a supposition as well. I remember reading a discussion on this topic between veterinary specialists years ago on VIN ( veterinary information network for vets only ), and the conclusion on this topic was that probably dogs eat grass just because they like it. If this behaviour has suddenly started or it is accompanied by other symptoms such as frequent vomiting and/or diarrhoea, I would recommend a vet check up in order to exclude any other gastrointestinal problems. All pet parents want to make sure that their dog is properly cared for if he is not well !


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