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Q. My Bulldog puppy growls, barks and even tries to bite me when I say "no" to him. What can I do?

Answered By
COURTNEY CONNORS

A. First, avoid scolding him and acting aggressively towards him if you don't want him to be acting aggressively towards you. There are other methods you can use to communicate to your dog that you don't want him to continue doing what he is doing. I recommend you stop telling him “no”, scolding him, or raising your voice at him. Everything coming from you should be 100% positive and 100% calm.

Try to figure out ways to clearly communicate what you want to your dog. If you want your dog to leave something or someone alone, I strongly suggest teaching your dog commands like "leave it". Here is a link to a video in which I explain how to do it:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

Another thing I suggest you use is a no-reward marker. This clearly communicates when your dog has done something wrong. No-reward markers have to be introduced during your training sessions. You should be doing at least three training sessions per day, that are something like 3-10 minutes long (working on different things each training session). If you are teaching your dog something BRAND NEW, do not use the no-reward marker, as you do not want to discourage your dog from performing behaviors for you. Use the no-reward marker for known behaviors only. Here is another helpful video about this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdU5a6fXKlg

Lure each new behavior (as shown in the video) using high value treats. Let's say you're working on "down" which is a behavior your dog knows fairly well. Present the treat to your dog. Ask your dog to "down" (only ask once). If he does not go "down" immediately, say, "uh-oh" or "eh-eh" in a gentle tone, and then place the treat behind your back. This communicates to your dog that they did something to make the treat go away.

After you place the treat behind your back to show your pup "that was wrong" you need to communicate to your pup "let's try again" by getting your pup to walk around for a second, and then start the behavior all over again. If your puppy is very young, chances are you haven't taught him a solid "down" behavior yet. So, as I said, do not use this method until you have lured each new behavior as shown in the video.

This is the order in which you should teach behaviors: Lure using a high value treat as shown in the video. After a few successful food lures, lure with an empty hand. If the pup is successful with the empty hand lure, reward with lots of treats. If the pup is unsuccessful, then go back to food-luring a couple more times. After a few successful empty-hand lures, you can begin to add the cue. Say "sit", then lure with an empty hand, and then reward. Once your pup understands the cue, begin to work on the no-reward marker.


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