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Q. My puppy won't go in his crate and wanders around my room at night and it appears he can't get comfortable. Help!!

Answered By
COURTNEY CONNORS

A. Post three:
You should be closing your puppy up in the crate during the night. This will ensure she sleeps soundly, and is safe. Safety is very important, as puppies can get into all kinds of trouble! If you practice this crate training exercise during the day, it'll be easier for you to place her into the crate at night, and close the door for good. If she whines, do not pay attention to her or else she will believe whining gets her attention. If during training she whines, you will need to wait until she is quiet before returning to the room to toss her some treats, and make sure you subtract at least a few seconds.. the key is to keep her from crying in the first place with that training exercise (only adding seconds at a time).

If you need more details on how to crate train, or more tips, please get a consultation with me! I will explain everything in greater detail.

Answered By
COURTNEY CONNORS

A. Post two:
The key is not to always be increasing the amount of time you are away, but rather, to *randomly change up* the amount of time you're away. More, then less, then more, then less, then *way* more, then way less, etc.
Lure the puppy into the crate using treats, close the crate, toss several treats inside, exit the room, count to 10. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 6. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 15. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 11. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 20. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 15. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 10. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 30. Return, toss treats exit, count to 40. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 20. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 45. Return, toss treats, exit, count to 15, end training. Go inside, and calmly (without saying a word, or making eye contact) open the crate door. Training is over. When crate training is over, the fun is over. Ignore her for a bit.

Answered By
COURTNEY CONNORS

A. Post one:
Crate/separation anxiety training is a really *slooow* process. Take baby steps! First, lure the puppy into the crate using high value treats like white meat chicken, mozzarella cheese sticks, diced ham, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, cooked fish, all cut into tiny little pieces. During this entire "crate training" process **you should be completely silent/calm and you should not be making eye contact with the pup.** This is all about *separation.* The more you engage the pup during separation training, the less the pup is learning about separation. Toss several treats inside of the crate with the door shut, and see if you can walk out of sight of the crate. Quickly return, toss several more treats inside, and leave again! Then return after a few seconds, and do it again. Then return after 5 seconds and do it again. Then return after 10 seconds and do it again. Then return after **3** seconds and do it again. Then return after **8** seconds and do it again.


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